Academics

Available Courses

TitleDescription
An Introduction to the Study of the Pentateuch

This course studies the first five books of the Bible, that the Jewish tradition calls Torah and the Christian tradition Pentateuch. After a presentation of their content and canonical aspect, their literary problems will be studied, which led to the classical documentary hypothesis. Then, the new approaches will be presented, and finally the major themes of the Pentateuch.

An Introduction to the Study of the Pentateuch

This course studies the first five books of the Bible, that the Jewish tradition calls Torah and the Christian tradition Pentateuch. After a presentation of their content and canonical aspect, their literary problems will be studied, which led to the classical documentary hypothesis. Then, the new approaches will be presented, and finally the major themes of the Pentateuch.

An Introduction to the Study of the Pentateuch

This course studies the first five books of the Bible, that the Jewish tradition calls Torah and the Christian tradition Pentateuch. After a presentation of their content and canonical aspect, their literary problems will be studied, which led to the classical documentary hypothesis. Then, the new approaches will be presented, and finally the major themes of the Pentateuch.

An Introduction to the Study of the Pentateuch

This course studies the first five books of the Bible, that the Jewish tradition calls Torah and the Christian tradition Pentateuch. After a presentation of their content and canonical aspect, their literary problems will be studied, which led to the classical documentary hypothesis. Then, the new approaches will be presented, and finally the major themes of the Pentateuch.

Analytic Philosophy

This course will survey the Analytic tradition in Philosophy. From the linguistic turn of Frege, Russel, Moore and Wittgenstein, it will explore the development of this tradition, notably through logical positivism (Carnap, Ayer) and ordinary language Philosophy (Ryle, Austin). We will also consider important figures in epistemology (Quine) and ethics (Rawls).

Analytic Philosophy

This course will survey the Analytic tradition in Philosophy. From the linguistic turn of Frege, Russel, Moore and Wittgenstein, it will explore the development of this tradition, notably through logical positivism (Carnap, Ayer) and ordinary language Philosophy (Ryle, Austin). We will also consider important figures in epistemology (Quine) and ethics (Rawls).

Analytic Philosophy

This course will survey the Analytic tradition in Philosophy. From the linguistic turn of Frege, Russel, Moore and Wittgenstein, it will explore the development of this tradition, notably through logical positivism (Carnap, Ayer) and ordinary language Philosophy (Ryle, Austin). We will also consider important figures in epistemology (Quine) and ethics (Rawls).

Analytic Philosophy

This course will survey the Analytic tradition in Philosophy. From the linguistic turn of Frege, Russel, Moore and Wittgenstein, it will explore the development of this tradition, notably through logical positivism (Carnap, Ayer) and ordinary language Philosophy (Ryle, Austin). We will also consider important figures in epistemology (Quine) and ethics (Rawls).

Analytic Philosophy

This course will survey the Analytic tradition in Philosophy. From the linguistic turn of Frege, Russel, Moore and Wittgenstein, it will explore the development of this tradition, notably through logical positivism (Carnap, Ayer) and ordinary language Philosophy (Ryle, Austin). We will also consider important figures in epistemology (Quine) and ethics (Rawls).

Ancient and Modern Dialectic

This course will attempt to understand how the immense contrariety between the ancient Greek confidence in reason and the modern assurance that such confidence is futile can be overcome. The class will read various texts, ancient and modern, in the context of this effort at a systematic reconciliation.

Ancient and Modern Dialectic

This course will attempt to understand how the immense contrariety between the ancient Greek confidence in reason and the modern assurance that such confidence is futile can be overcome. The class will read various texts, ancient and modern, in the context of this effort at a systematic reconciliation.

Ancient and Modern Dialectic

This course will attempt to understand how the immense contrariety between the ancient Greek confidence in reason and the modern assurance that such confidence is futile can be overcome. The class will read various texts, ancient and modern, in the context of this effort at a systematic reconciliation.

Ancient and Modern Dialectic

This course will attempt to understand how the immense contrariety between the ancient Greek confidence in reason and the modern assurance that such confidence is futile can be overcome. The class will read various texts, ancient and modern, in the context of this effort at a systematic reconciliation.

Ancient Greek Philosophy

This course is divided into four parts. 1) The Pre-Socratics: a discussion beginning with the Ionians, moving to Parmenides and Heraclitus, and touching upon the Atomists, Empedocles, Anaxagoras, the Pythagoreans, and the Sophists. 2) Socrates and Plato. 3) Aristotle (and touching upon the Stoics, Cynics, Epicureans). 4) Neo-Platonism. Most attention is paid to Plato and Aristotle.

Ancient Greek Philosophy

Ancient Greek Philosophy

This course is divided into four parts. 1) The Pre-Socratics: a discussion beginning with the Ionians, moving to Parmenides and Heraclitus, and touching upon the Atomists, Empedocles, Anaxagoras, the Pythagoreans, and the Sophists. 2) Socrates and Plato. 3) Aristotle (and touching upon the Stoics, Cynics, Epicureans). 4) Neo-Platonism. Most attention is paid to Plato and Aristotle.

Ancient Greek Philosophy

Ancient Greek Philosophy

This course is divided into four parts. 1) The Pre-Socratics: a discussion beginning with the Ionians, moving to Parmenides and Heraclitus, and touching upon the Atomists, Empedocles, Anaxagoras, the Pythagoreans, and the Sophists. 2) Socrates and Plato. 3) Aristotle (and touching upon the Stoics, Cynics, Epicureans). 4) Neo-Platonism. Most attention is paid to Plato and Aristotle.

Ancient Greek Philosophy

Ancient Greek Philosophy

This course is divided into four parts. 1) The Pre-Socratics: a discussion beginning with the Ionians, moving to Parmenides and Heraclitus, and touching upon the Atomists, Empedocles, Anaxagoras, the Pythagoreans, and the Sophists. 2) Socrates and Plato. 3) Aristotle (and touching upon the Stoics, Cynics, Epicureans). 4) Neo-Platonism. Most attention is paid to Plato and Aristotle.

Ancient Greek Philosophy

Ancient Greek Philosophy

This course is divided into four parts. 1) The Pre-Socratics: a discussion beginning with the Ionians, moving to Parmenides and Heraclitus, and touching upon the Atomists, Empedocles, Anaxagoras, the Pythagoreans, and the Sophists. 2) Socrates and Plato. 3) Aristotle (and touching upon the Stoics, Cynics, Epicureans). 4) Neo-Platonism. Most attention is paid to Plato and Aristotle.

Applied Ethics

This course will look at the fundamental approaches and methods in applied ethics. It will introduce students to the case study method and emphasize decision-making and decision theory in ethics. The course will also look at effective ethics programs for organizations, ethics codes, professional ethics and other measures and activities in the organizational world.

Applied Ethics II

Applied Ethics II

Feminists thinkers have had a significant influence on normative ethics, ecological thinking, biomedical ethics, and theories of justice. Furthermore, many philosophical issues have originated from feminism. In this course, students will engage in philosophical discussions within the framework of feminism, in general, and ethics of care, in particular. Some of the topics addressed will include normativity, ecological thinking, maternal thinking, the capabilities approach, and ethics of disability through the analysis of texts authored by a number of ethicists of care such as Carol Gilligan, Nel Noddings, Martha Nussbaum, Sara Ruddick, and Marti Kheel. This course is predominantly lecture based with moderated class discussions. Students are expected to demonstrate in-depth comprehension of the texts to be measured by knowledge-based assignments, ability to coherently articulate personal views, as well as defend various positions on topics covered in the course.

Applied Ethics II

Applied Ethics II

Feminists thinkers have had a significant influence on normative ethics, ecological thinking, biomedical ethics, and theories of justice. Furthermore, many philosophical issues have originated from feminism. In this course, students will engage in philosophical discussions within the framework of feminism, in general, and ethics of care, in particular. Some of the topics addressed will include normativity, ecological thinking, maternal thinking, the capabilities approach, and ethics of disability through the analysis of texts authored by a number of ethicists of care such as Carol Gilligan, Nel Noddings, Martha Nussbaum, Sara Ruddick, and Marti Kheel. This course is predominantly lecture based with moderated class discussions. Students are expected to demonstrate in-depth comprehension of the texts to be measured by knowledge-based assignments, ability to coherently articulate personal views, as well as defend various positions on topics covered in the course.

Applied Ethics II

Applied Ethics II

Feminists thinkers have had a significant influence on normative ethics, ecological thinking, biomedical ethics, and theories of justice. Furthermore, many philosophical issues have originated from feminism. In this course, students will engage in philosophical discussions within the framework of feminism, in general, and ethics of care, in particular. Some of the topics addressed will include normativity, ecological thinking, maternal thinking, the capabilities approach, and ethics of disability through the analysis of texts authored by a number of ethicists of care such as Carol Gilligan, Nel Noddings, Martha Nussbaum, Sara Ruddick, and Marti Kheel. This course is predominantly lecture based with moderated class discussions. Students are expected to demonstrate in-depth comprehension of the texts to be measured by knowledge-based assignments, ability to coherently articulate personal views, as well as defend various positions on topics covered in the course.

Applied Ethics II

Applied Ethics II

Feminists thinkers have had a significant influence on normative ethics, ecological thinking, biomedical ethics, and theories of justice. Furthermore, many philosophical issues have originated from feminism. In this course, students will engage in philosophical discussions within the framework of feminism, in general, and ethics of care, in particular. Some of the topics addressed will include normativity, ecological thinking, maternal thinking, the capabilities approach, and ethics of disability through the analysis of texts authored by a number of ethicists of care such as Carol Gilligan, Nel Noddings, Martha Nussbaum, Sara Ruddick, and Marti Kheel. This course is predominantly lecture based with moderated class discussions. Students are expected to demonstrate in-depth comprehension of the texts to be measured by knowledge-based assignments, ability to coherently articulate personal views, as well as defend various positions on topics covered in the course.

Applied Ethics III

This course will look at the fundamental approaches and methods in applied ethics. It will introduce students to the case study method and emphasize decision-making and decision theory in ethics. The course will also look at effective ethics programs for organizations, ethics codes, professional ethics and other measures and activities in the organizational world.

Applied Ethics III

This course will look at the fundamental approaches and methods in applied ethics. It will introduce students to the case study method and emphasize decision-making and decision theory in ethics. The course will also look at effective ethics programs for organizations, ethics codes, professional ethics and other measures and activities in the organizational world.

Applied Ethics III

This course will look at the fundamental approaches and methods in applied ethics. It will introduce students to the case study method and emphasize decision-making and decision theory in ethics. The course will also look at effective ethics programs for organizations, ethics codes, professional ethics and other measures and activities in the organizational world.

Applied Ethics III

This course will look at the fundamental approaches and methods in applied ethics. It will introduce students to the case study method and emphasize decision-making and decision theory in ethics. The course will also look at effective ethics programs for organizations, ethics codes, professional ethics and other measures and activities in the organizational world.

Aquinas, virtues, regimes of interaction and society

In the wake of the renewal of « virtue » ethics, works on Thomas Aquinas’ propositions on the human act and agency and his version of “virtue” have been published. This seminar proposes a different perspective of the idea of the human act and its structure that is rather centered on the notions of “vice” and “sin”. Hence, it offers a more complex vision of Aquinas’ understanding of the human act. During this seminar, students will analyze the issues linked to concepts and perspectives of the vicious act, according to Aquinas. By reading the Summa Theologiae and other writings in Aquinas’ corpus of texts, students will examine and refine their personal reflection on the idea of vice. Students will be assessed periodically in this course on the outcomes and interpretation of their reading assignments, on their communication skills and attitudes by means of oral presentations and by active participation in classroom discussions and debates.

Aquinas, virtues, regimes of interaction and society

In the wake of the renewal of « virtue » ethics, works on Thomas Aquinas’ propositions on the human act and agency and his version of “virtue” have been published. This seminar proposes a different perspective of the idea of the human act and its structure that is rather centered on the notions of “vice” and “sin”. Hence, it offers a more complex vision of Aquinas’ understanding of the human act. During this seminar, students will analyze the issues linked to concepts and perspectives of the vicious act, according to Aquinas. By reading the Summa Theologiae and other writings in Aquinas’ corpus of texts, students will examine and refine their personal reflection on the idea of vice. Students will be assessed periodically in this course on the outcomes and interpretation of their reading assignments, on their communication skills and attitudes by means of oral presentations and by active participation in classroom discussions and debates.

Aquinas, Virtues, Regimes of Interaction and Society

Articles and books on Aquinas’ idea of virtue and of specific virtues constitute a library, this is without counting the numerable articles and books on “virtue ethics” since Philippa Foot’s seminal text. Most of this literature focuses on the agent, the acts, their motivations and justifications. In the course of this seminar, we will explore the relation between virtues and human acts in so far as they are related to specific regimes of social interactions. Which regimes seem to constitute the locus of which virtues treated by Aquinas? Why these? Could virtues be integrated in other regimes (see Boltanski’s “cities”)? With these questions, this seminar hopes to open new research avenues within thomist circles and to bring Aquinas’ options to enter in conversation with other approaches to human action.

Aquinas, virtues, regimes of interaction and society

In the wake of the renewal of « virtue » ethics, works on Thomas Aquinas’ propositions on the human act and agency and his version of “virtue” have been published. This seminar proposes a different perspective of the idea of the human act and its structure that is rather centered on the notions of “vice” and “sin”. Hence, it offers a more complex vision of Aquinas’ understanding of the human act. During this seminar, students will analyze the issues linked to concepts and perspectives of the vicious act, according to Aquinas. By reading the Summa Theologiae and other writings in Aquinas’ corpus of texts, students will examine and refine their personal reflection on the idea of vice. Students will be assessed periodically in this course on the outcomes and interpretation of their reading assignments, on their communication skills and attitudes by means of oral presentations and by active participation in classroom discussions and debates.

Aquinas, virtues, regimes of interaction and society

In the wake of the renewal of « virtue » ethics, works on Thomas Aquinas’ propositions on the human act and agency and his version of “virtue” have been published. This seminar proposes a different perspective of the idea of the human act and its structure that is rather centered on the notions of “vice” and “sin”. Hence, it offers a more complex vision of Aquinas’ understanding of the human act. During this seminar, students will analyze the issues linked to concepts and perspectives of the vicious act, according to Aquinas. By reading the Summa Theologiae and other writings in Aquinas’ corpus of texts, students will examine and refine their personal reflection on the idea of vice. Students will be assessed periodically in this course on the outcomes and interpretation of their reading assignments, on their communication skills and attitudes by means of oral presentations and by active participation in classroom discussions and debates.

Aquinas, Virtues, Regimes of Interaction and Society

Articles and books on Aquinas’ idea of virtue and of specific virtues constitute a library, this is without counting the numerable articles and books on “virtue ethics” since Philippa Foot’s seminal text. Most of this literature focuses on the agent, the acts, their motivations and justifications. In the course of this seminar, we will explore the relation between virtues and human acts in so far as they are related to specific regimes of social interactions. Which regimes seem to constitute the locus of which virtues treated by Aquinas? Why these? Could virtues be integrated in other regimes (see Boltanski’s “cities”)? With these questions, this seminar hopes to open new research avenues within thomist circles and to bring Aquinas’ options to enter in conversation with other approaches to human action.

Aquinas, virtues, regimes of interaction and society

In the wake of the renewal of « virtue » ethics, works on Thomas Aquinas’ propositions on the human act and agency and his version of “virtue” have been published. This seminar proposes a different perspective of the idea of the human act and its structure that is rather centered on the notions of “vice” and “sin”. Hence, it offers a more complex vision of Aquinas’ understanding of the human act. During this seminar, students will analyze the issues linked to concepts and perspectives of the vicious act, according to Aquinas. By reading the Summa Theologiae and other writings in Aquinas’ corpus of texts, students will examine and refine their personal reflection on the idea of vice. Students will be assessed periodically in this course on the outcomes and interpretation of their reading assignments, on their communication skills and attitudes by means of oral presentations and by active participation in classroom discussions and debates.

Aquinas, virtues, regimes of interaction and society

In the wake of the renewal of « virtue » ethics, works on Thomas Aquinas’ propositions on the human act and agency and his version of “virtue” have been published. This seminar proposes a different perspective of the idea of the human act and its structure that is rather centered on the notions of “vice” and “sin”. Hence, it offers a more complex vision of Aquinas’ understanding of the human act. During this seminar, students will analyze the issues linked to concepts and perspectives of the vicious act, according to Aquinas. By reading the Summa Theologiae and other writings in Aquinas’ corpus of texts, students will examine and refine their personal reflection on the idea of vice. Students will be assessed periodically in this course on the outcomes and interpretation of their reading assignments, on their communication skills and attitudes by means of oral presentations and by active participation in classroom discussions and debates.

Aquinas, virtues, regimes of interaction and society

In the wake of the renewal of « virtue » ethics, works on Thomas Aquinas’ propositions on the human act and agency and his version of “virtue” have been published. This seminar proposes a different perspective of the idea of the human act and its structure that is rather centered on the notions of “vice” and “sin”. Hence, it offers a more complex vision of Aquinas’ understanding of the human act. During this seminar, students will analyze the issues linked to concepts and perspectives of the vicious act, according to Aquinas. By reading the Summa Theologiae and other writings in Aquinas’ corpus of texts, students will examine and refine their personal reflection on the idea of vice. Students will be assessed periodically in this course on the outcomes and interpretation of their reading assignments, on their communication skills and attitudes by means of oral presentations and by active participation in classroom discussions and debates.

Aquinas, virtues, regimes of interaction and society

In the wake of the renewal of « virtue » ethics, works on Thomas Aquinas’ propositions on the human act and agency and his version of “virtue” have been published. This seminar proposes a different perspective of the idea of the human act and its structure that is rather centered on the notions of “vice” and “sin”. Hence, it offers a more complex vision of Aquinas’ understanding of the human act. During this seminar, students will analyze the issues linked to concepts and perspectives of the vicious act, according to Aquinas. By reading the Summa Theologiae and other writings in Aquinas’ corpus of texts, students will examine and refine their personal reflection on the idea of vice. Students will be assessed periodically in this course on the outcomes and interpretation of their reading assignments, on their communication skills and attitudes by means of oral presentations and by active participation in classroom discussions and debates.

Aquinas, Virtues, Regimes of Interaction and Society

Articles and books on Aquinas’ idea of virtue and of specific virtues constitute a library, this is without counting the numerable articles and books on “virtue ethics” since Philippa Foot’s seminal text. Most of this literature focuses on the agent, the acts, their motivations and justifications. In the course of this seminar, we will explore the relation between virtues and human acts in so far as they are related to specific regimes of social interactions. Which regimes seem to constitute the locus of which virtues treated by Aquinas? Why these? Could virtues be integrated in other regimes (see Boltanski’s “cities”)? With these questions, this seminar hopes to open new research avenues within thomist circles and to bring Aquinas’ options to enter in conversation with other approaches to human action.

Aristotle and Neoplatonism

The thousand-year history of Greek Philosophy ends with Neoplatonism, which in turn makes possible a transition to Christianity as the intellectual carrier of Western thought and culture. One of the most fascinating aspects of Neoplatonism is its enormous debt to Aristotle and his followers. At the same time, Neoplatonists consciously rejected Aristotelian claims of supplanting Plato and Platonism. Yet we may say in retrospect that Neoplatonism is in some ways “neo-Aristotelianism”. This seminar will take as its objective to understand Aristotle’s great but little understood influence on Neoplatonism and through it on Christian intellectualism.

Aristotle’s Metaphysics

Aristotle’s Metaphysics

 

Aristotle's Metaphysics, while one of the most celebrated and commented upon of all philosophical works, remains mostly unread and problematic for moderns. Central to Later Greek and Medieval philosophers and theologians (notably Plotinus and Aquinas), the work, if considered at all, tends to be thought incidental to modern thinking. Members of this seminar can reasonably be expected to work at analyzing and synthesizing this text (or at least parts of it) as an ancient might do, while trying to understand how ancient metaphysics might provide some needful ballast to our modern voyage. Presentation of background material, dialectical discussion and considerations of important commentators should occur when feasible.

Aristotle’s Metaphysics

Aristotle’s Metaphysics

 

Aristotle's Metaphysics, while one of the most celebrated and commented upon of all philosophical works, remains mostly unread and problematic for moderns. Central to Later Greek and Medieval philosophers and theologians (notably Plotinus and Aquinas), the work, if considered at all, tends to be thought incidental to modern thinking. Members of this seminar can reasonably be expected to work at analyzing and synthesizing this text (or at least parts of it) as an ancient might do, while trying to understand how ancient metaphysics might provide some needful ballast to our modern voyage. Presentation of background material, dialectical discussion and considerations of important commentators should occur when feasible.

Aristotle’s Metaphysics

Aristotle’s Metaphysics, while one of the most celebrated and commented upon of all philosophical works, remains mostly unread and problematic for moderns. Central to Later Greek and Medieval philosophers and theologians (notably Plotinus and Aquinas), the work, if considered at all, tends to be thought incidental to modern thinking. Members of this seminar can reasonably be expected to work at analyzing and synthesizing this text (or at least parts of it) as an ancient might do, while trying to understand how ancient metaphysics might provide some needful ballast to our modern voyage. Presentation of background material, dialectical discussion and considerations of important commentators should occur when feasible.

Aristotle’s Metaphysics

Aristotle’s Metaphysics, while one of the most celebrated and commented upon of all philosophical works, remains mostly unread and problematic for moderns. Central to Later Greek and Medieval philosophers and theologians (notably Plotinus and Aquinas), the work, if considered at all, tends to be thought incidental to modern thinking. Members of this seminar can reasonably be expected to work at analyzing and synthesizing this text (or at least parts of it) as an ancient might do, while trying to understand how ancient metaphysics might provide some needful ballast to our modern voyage. Presentation of background material, dialectical discussion and considerations of important commentators should occur when feasible.

Aristotle’s Metaphysics

Aristotle’s Metaphysics

 

Aristotle's Metaphysics, while one of the most celebrated and commented upon of all philosophical works, remains mostly unread and problematic for moderns. Central to Later Greek and Medieval philosophers and theologians (notably Plotinus and Aquinas), the work, if considered at all, tends to be thought incidental to modern thinking. Members of this seminar can reasonably be expected to work at analyzing and synthesizing this text (or at least parts of it) as an ancient might do, while trying to understand how ancient metaphysics might provide some needful ballast to our modern voyage. Presentation of background material, dialectical discussion and considerations of important commentators should occur when feasible.

Aristotle’s Metaphysics

Aristotle’s Metaphysics, while one of the most celebrated and commented upon of all philosophical works, remains mostly unread and problematic for moderns. Central to Later Greek and Medieval philosophers and theologians (notably Plotinus and Aquinas), the work, if considered at all, tends to be thought incidental to modern thinking. Members of this seminar can reasonably be expected to work at analyzing and synthesizing this text (or at least parts of it) as an ancient might do, while trying to understand how ancient metaphysics might provide some needful ballast to our modern voyage. Presentation of background material, dialectical discussion and considerations of important commentators should occur when feasible.

Aristotle’s Metaphysics

Aristotle’s Metaphysics

 

Aristotle's Metaphysics, while one of the most celebrated and commented upon of all philosophical works, remains mostly unread and problematic for moderns. Central to Later Greek and Medieval philosophers and theologians (notably Plotinus and Aquinas), the work, if considered at all, tends to be thought incidental to modern thinking. Members of this seminar can reasonably be expected to work at analyzing and synthesizing this text (or at least parts of it) as an ancient might do, while trying to understand how ancient metaphysics might provide some needful ballast to our modern voyage. Presentation of background material, dialectical discussion and considerations of important commentators should occur when feasible.

Aristotle’s Metaphysics

Aristotle’s Metaphysics, while one of the most celebrated and commented upon of all philosophical works, remains mostly unread and problematic for moderns. Central to Later Greek and Medieval philosophers and theologians (notably Plotinus and Aquinas), the work, if considered at all, tends to be thought incidental to modern thinking. Members of this seminar can reasonably be expected to work at analyzing and synthesizing this text (or at least parts of it) as an ancient might do, while trying to understand how ancient metaphysics might provide some needful ballast to our modern voyage. Presentation of background material, dialectical discussion and considerations of important commentators should occur when feasible.

Bible and Sexuality

~~This course will present what the Bible says concerning sexuality. We will look at different aspects: marriage as related to household, ownership and inheritance, divorce, adultery, rape and seduction, prostitution, incest, same sex intercourse, men and women in community and leadership issues and finally celibacy. We will also try to identify the broader assumptions which underlie these Biblical sayings. This course will show the students how to study a Biblical theme (methodological dimension) and how Churches use the Bible in their teaching on sexuality (hermeneutical dimension).

 

Bible and Sexuality

~~This course will present what the Bible says concerning sexuality. We will look at different aspects: marriage as related to household, ownership and inheritance, divorce, adultery, rape and seduction, prostitution, incest, same sex intercourse, men and women in community and leadership issues and finally celibacy. We will also try to identify the broader assumptions which underlie these Biblical sayings. This course will show the students how to study a Biblical theme (methodological dimension) and how Churches use the Bible in their teaching on sexuality (hermeneutical dimension).

 

Bible and Sexuality

~~This course will present what the Bible says concerning sexuality. We will look at different aspects: marriage as related to household, ownership and inheritance, divorce, adultery, rape and seduction, prostitution, incest, same sex intercourse, men and women in community and leadership issues and finally celibacy. We will also try to identify the broader assumptions which underlie these Biblical sayings. This course will show the students how to study a Biblical theme (methodological dimension) and how Churches use the Bible in their teaching on sexuality (hermeneutical dimension).

 

Bible and Sexuality

~~This course will present what the Bible says concerning sexuality. We will look at different aspects: marriage as related to household, ownership and inheritance, divorce, adultery, rape and seduction, prostitution, incest, same sex intercourse, men and women in community and leadership issues and finally celibacy. We will also try to identify the broader assumptions which underlie these Biblical sayings. This course will show the students how to study a Biblical theme (methodological dimension) and how Churches use the Bible in their teaching on sexuality (hermeneutical dimension).

 

Bible et archéologie/Bible and Archeology (Ph.D.)

Bible et archéologie / Bible and Archeology (Ph. D.) 

Pendant des siècles, les croyants ont lu la Bible en pensant que tout ce qui y était raconté s’était passé exactement comme c’était dit, en d’autres termes, que tout était « historique ». De toute façon, rien n’aurait pu leur faire penser autrement puisqu’il n’y avait aucune autre source et que leur monde ressemblait beaucoup au monde biblique. Les premières fouilles archéologiques du 19e siècle ont d’abord semblé montré que cette façon de voir était juste et prouver l’historicité de la Bible. S’il y avait des désaccords, ceux-ci étaient jugés mineurs. C’est ce qu’on a appelé « l’archéologie biblique ». Tout a brutalement changé autour de 1990 avec la nouvelle archéologie. En utilisant de nouvelles méthodes dans des régions jusque-là sous-exploitées, les résultats se sont avérés surprenants et ont mis en questions les anciennes certitudes. Tout cela a causé un débat houleux dans le monde savant ainsi que dans les médias. Si les résultats de la nouvelle archéologie sont exacts, toute la question historique de la Bible, surtout de l’Ancien Testament, doit être complètement repensée. Qu’est-ce que cela implique pour la foi judéo-chrétienne, fondée sur cette histoire? Ce sont ces questions sur lesquelles se penchera notre séminaire de recherche.

For centuries, believers who read the Bible thought that all it tells happened exactly as told, in other words that all was “historical”. Nothing anyway would have led them to think in a different way since there were no other source and their world resembled the biblical one. Early archaeological surveys in the 19th century first seemed to show that this was right and to prove the “historicity” of the Bible. If there were disagreements, they were deemed minor. This is what has been called “Biblical archaeology”. All changed around 1990 with the new archaeology. Using new methods in under exploited areas until then, the results were astonishing and questioned the certainties. Almost nothing of what the Bible says seemed to have really happened or taken place. These opinions caused a heated debate in the scholarly world and an uproar in the general media. If the results of this new archaeology are right, the whole historical question in the Bible, especially the Old Testament, has to be completely rethought. What does this imply for the Judeo-Christian faith that is precisely built on history? These are the questions and issues that our research seminar will deal with.

 

Bible et archéologie/Bible and Archeology (Ph.D.)

Bible et archéologie / Bible and Archeology (Ph. D.) 

Pendant des siècles, les croyants ont lu la Bible en pensant que tout ce qui y était raconté s’était passé exactement comme c’était dit, en d’autres termes, que tout était « historique ». De toute façon, rien n’aurait pu leur faire penser autrement puisqu’il n’y avait aucune autre source et que leur monde ressemblait beaucoup au monde biblique. Les premières fouilles archéologiques du 19e siècle ont d’abord semblé montré que cette façon de voir était juste et prouver l’historicité de la Bible. S’il y avait des désaccords, ceux-ci étaient jugés mineurs. C’est ce qu’on a appelé « l’archéologie biblique ». Tout a brutalement changé autour de 1990 avec la nouvelle archéologie. En utilisant de nouvelles méthodes dans des régions jusque-là sous-exploitées, les résultats se sont avérés surprenants et ont mis en questions les anciennes certitudes. Tout cela a causé un débat houleux dans le monde savant ainsi que dans les médias. Si les résultats de la nouvelle archéologie sont exacts, toute la question historique de la Bible, surtout de l’Ancien Testament, doit être complètement repensée. Qu’est-ce que cela implique pour la foi judéo-chrétienne, fondée sur cette histoire? Ce sont ces questions sur lesquelles se penchera notre séminaire de recherche.

For centuries, believers who read the Bible thought that all it tells happened exactly as told, in other words that all was “historical”. Nothing anyway would have led them to think in a different way since there were no other source and their world resembled the biblical one. Early archaeological surveys in the 19th century first seemed to show that this was right and to prove the “historicity” of the Bible. If there were disagreements, they were deemed minor. This is what has been called “Biblical archaeology”. All changed around 1990 with the new archaeology. Using new methods in under exploited areas until then, the results were astonishing and questioned the certainties. Almost nothing of what the Bible says seemed to have really happened or taken place. These opinions caused a heated debate in the scholarly world and an uproar in the general media. If the results of this new archaeology are right, the whole historical question in the Bible, especially the Old Testament, has to be completely rethought. What does this imply for the Judeo-Christian faith that is precisely built on history? These are the questions and issues that our research seminar will deal with.

 

Bible et archéologie/Bible and Archeology (Ph.D.)

Bible et archéologie / Bible and Archeology (Ph. D.) 

Pendant des siècles, les croyants ont lu la Bible en pensant que tout ce qui y était raconté s’était passé exactement comme c’était dit, en d’autres termes, que tout était « historique ». De toute façon, rien n’aurait pu leur faire penser autrement puisqu’il n’y avait aucune autre source et que leur monde ressemblait beaucoup au monde biblique. Les premières fouilles archéologiques du 19e siècle ont d’abord semblé montré que cette façon de voir était juste et prouver l’historicité de la Bible. S’il y avait des désaccords, ceux-ci étaient jugés mineurs. C’est ce qu’on a appelé « l’archéologie biblique ». Tout a brutalement changé autour de 1990 avec la nouvelle archéologie. En utilisant de nouvelles méthodes dans des régions jusque-là sous-exploitées, les résultats se sont avérés surprenants et ont mis en questions les anciennes certitudes. Tout cela a causé un débat houleux dans le monde savant ainsi que dans les médias. Si les résultats de la nouvelle archéologie sont exacts, toute la question historique de la Bible, surtout de l’Ancien Testament, doit être complètement repensée. Qu’est-ce que cela implique pour la foi judéo-chrétienne, fondée sur cette histoire? Ce sont ces questions sur lesquelles se penchera notre séminaire de recherche.

For centuries, believers who read the Bible thought that all it tells happened exactly as told, in other words that all was “historical”. Nothing anyway would have led them to think in a different way since there were no other source and their world resembled the biblical one. Early archaeological surveys in the 19th century first seemed to show that this was right and to prove the “historicity” of the Bible. If there were disagreements, they were deemed minor. This is what has been called “Biblical archaeology”. All changed around 1990 with the new archaeology. Using new methods in under exploited areas until then, the results were astonishing and questioned the certainties. Almost nothing of what the Bible says seemed to have really happened or taken place. These opinions caused a heated debate in the scholarly world and an uproar in the general media. If the results of this new archaeology are right, the whole historical question in the Bible, especially the Old Testament, has to be completely rethought. What does this imply for the Judeo-Christian faith that is precisely built on history? These are the questions and issues that our research seminar will deal with.

 

Bible et archéologie/Bible and Archeology (Ph.D.)

Bible et archéologie / Bible and Archeology (Ph. D.) 

Pendant des siècles, les croyants ont lu la Bible en pensant que tout ce qui y était raconté s’était passé exactement comme c’était dit, en d’autres termes, que tout était « historique ». De toute façon, rien n’aurait pu leur faire penser autrement puisqu’il n’y avait aucune autre source et que leur monde ressemblait beaucoup au monde biblique. Les premières fouilles archéologiques du 19e siècle ont d’abord semblé montré que cette façon de voir était juste et prouver l’historicité de la Bible. S’il y avait des désaccords, ceux-ci étaient jugés mineurs. C’est ce qu’on a appelé « l’archéologie biblique ». Tout a brutalement changé autour de 1990 avec la nouvelle archéologie. En utilisant de nouvelles méthodes dans des régions jusque-là sous-exploitées, les résultats se sont avérés surprenants et ont mis en questions les anciennes certitudes. Tout cela a causé un débat houleux dans le monde savant ainsi que dans les médias. Si les résultats de la nouvelle archéologie sont exacts, toute la question historique de la Bible, surtout de l’Ancien Testament, doit être complètement repensée. Qu’est-ce que cela implique pour la foi judéo-chrétienne, fondée sur cette histoire? Ce sont ces questions sur lesquelles se penchera notre séminaire de recherche.

For centuries, believers who read the Bible thought that all it tells happened exactly as told, in other words that all was “historical”. Nothing anyway would have led them to think in a different way since there were no other source and their world resembled the biblical one. Early archaeological surveys in the 19th century first seemed to show that this was right and to prove the “historicity” of the Bible. If there were disagreements, they were deemed minor. This is what has been called “Biblical archaeology”. All changed around 1990 with the new archaeology. Using new methods in under exploited areas until then, the results were astonishing and questioned the certainties. Almost nothing of what the Bible says seemed to have really happened or taken place. These opinions caused a heated debate in the scholarly world and an uproar in the general media. If the results of this new archaeology are right, the whole historical question in the Bible, especially the Old Testament, has to be completely rethought. What does this imply for the Judeo-Christian faith that is precisely built on history? These are the questions and issues that our research seminar will deal with.

 

Biblical Greek

This course will introduce students to Greek language and grammar for the reading of Biblical texts, in particular the New Testament.

Biblical Greek

This course will introduce students to Greek language and grammar for the reading of Biblical texts, in particular the New Testament.

Biblical Greek

This course will introduce students to Greek language and grammar for the reading of Biblical texts, in particular the New Testament.

Biblical Greek

This course will introduce students to Greek language and grammar for the reading of Biblical texts, in particular the New Testament.

Business Ethics

Business Ethics

Ethics is an important component of contemporary business life, as well as in the long history of commerce and trade. This course explores the role and place of ethics in modern business organizations. There are many ways to consider ethics in business. Laws, regulations, codes of ethics and deontology provide a framework for decision-making and action, but as business persons, we are faced with problems and situations that require our moral deliberation and judgement, relying on our recognition of moral values, rules and obligations. The course will cover both ethics codes, frameworks, programs found in the business world and ethical decision-making in business, based on principles and values.

Business Ethics

Business Ethics

Ethics is an important component of contemporary business life, as well as in the long history of commerce and trade. This course explores the role and place of ethics in modern business organizations. There are many ways to consider ethics in business. Laws, regulations, codes of ethics and deontology provide a framework for decision-making and action, but as business persons, we are faced with problems and situations that require our moral deliberation and judgement, relying on our recognition of moral values, rules and obligations. The course will cover both ethics codes, frameworks, programs found in the business world and ethical decision-making in business, based on principles and values.

Business Ethics

Business Ethics

Ethics is an important component of contemporary business life, as well as in the long history of commerce and trade. This course explores the role and place of ethics in modern business organizations. There are many ways to consider ethics in business. Laws, regulations, codes of ethics and deontology provide a framework for decision-making and action, but as business persons, we are faced with problems and situations that require our moral deliberation and judgement, relying on our recognition of moral values, rules and obligations. The course will cover both ethics codes, frameworks, programs found in the business world and ethical decision-making in business, based on principles and values.

Business Ethics

Business Ethics

Ethics is an important component of contemporary business life, as well as in the long history of commerce and trade. This course explores the role and place of ethics in modern business organizations. There are many ways to consider ethics in business. Laws, regulations, codes of ethics and deontology provide a framework for decision-making and action, but as business persons, we are faced with problems and situations that require our moral deliberation and judgement, relying on our recognition of moral values, rules and obligations. The course will cover both ethics codes, frameworks, programs found in the business world and ethical decision-making in business, based on principles and values.

Canadian Catholics Through the Ages

Canadian Catholics Through the Ages 

From the arrival of the first priests in Newfoundland in 1498 up to the organization of the International Eucharistic Congress of Quebec City in 2008, the Catholic Church has formed an integral part of the Canadian landscape. Through preparatory readings and class lectures, the students will explore different topics to map the implantation of the Catholic Church and its development in Canada. Through an exploration of their own family history, students will position themselves within this landscape. They will also broaden their reflection through the exploration of a particular topic or an important spiritual text.

Canadian Catholics Through the Ages

Canadian Catholics Through the Ages 

From the arrival of the first priests in Newfoundland in 1498 up to the organization of the International Eucharistic Congress of Quebec City in 2008, the Catholic Church has formed an integral part of the Canadian landscape. Through preparatory readings and class lectures, the students will explore different topics to map the implantation of the Catholic Church and its development in Canada. Through an exploration of their own family history, students will position themselves within this landscape. They will also broaden their reflection through the exploration of a particular topic or an important spiritual text.

Canadian Catholics Through the Ages

Canadian Catholics Through the Ages 

From the arrival of the first priests in Newfoundland in 1498 up to the organization of the International Eucharistic Congress of Quebec City in 2008, the Catholic Church has formed an integral part of the Canadian landscape. Through preparatory readings and class lectures, the students will explore different topics to map the implantation of the Catholic Church and its development in Canada. Through an exploration of their own family history, students will position themselves within this landscape. They will also broaden their reflection through the exploration of a particular topic or an important spiritual text.

Canadian Catholics Through the Ages

Canadian Catholics Through the Ages 

From the arrival of the first priests in Newfoundland in 1498 up to the organization of the International Eucharistic Congress of Quebec City in 2008, the Catholic Church has formed an integral part of the Canadian landscape. Through preparatory readings and class lectures, the students will explore different topics to map the implantation of the Catholic Church and its development in Canada. Through an exploration of their own family history, students will position themselves within this landscape. They will also broaden their reflection through the exploration of a particular topic or an important spiritual text.

Catholic Social Teaching

Catholic Social Teaching
(Videoconference from the IPD) 

 

Justice and peace are central to the proclamation of the Gospel. In the first part of this course, we will examine key principles of Catholic social teaching — the dignity of the person, the common good, the option for the poor, and solidarity – as well as how these principles have evolved since the end of the 19th Century and the encyclical Rerum novarum. We will consider how these principles apply in the workplace, in economic structures, in the political domain, in peace-building and in the care of creation. We will pay close attention to the contribution made by the bishops of Canada, and notably of Québec, to the development and the concrete application of this teaching.

Catholic Social Teaching

Catholic Social Teaching
(Videoconference from the IPD) 

 

Justice and peace are central to the proclamation of the Gospel. In the first part of this course, we will examine key principles of Catholic social teaching — the dignity of the person, the common good, the option for the poor, and solidarity – as well as how these principles have evolved since the end of the 19th Century and the encyclical Rerum novarum. We will consider how these principles apply in the workplace, in economic structures, in the political domain, in peace-building and in the care of creation. We will pay close attention to the contribution made by the bishops of Canada, and notably of Québec, to the development and the concrete application of this teaching.

Catholic Social Teaching

Catholic Social Teaching
(Videoconference from the IPD) 

 

Justice and peace are central to the proclamation of the Gospel. In the first part of this course, we will examine key principles of Catholic social teaching — the dignity of the person, the common good, the option for the poor, and solidarity – as well as how these principles have evolved since the end of the 19th Century and the encyclical Rerum novarum. We will consider how these principles apply in the workplace, in economic structures, in the political domain, in peace-building and in the care of creation. We will pay close attention to the contribution made by the bishops of Canada, and notably of Québec, to the development and the concrete application of this teaching.

Catholic Social Teaching

Catholic Social Teaching
(Videoconference from the IPD) 

 

Justice and peace are central to the proclamation of the Gospel. In the first part of this course, we will examine key principles of Catholic social teaching — the dignity of the person, the common good, the option for the poor, and solidarity – as well as how these principles have evolved since the end of the 19th Century and the encyclical Rerum novarum. We will consider how these principles apply in the workplace, in economic structures, in the political domain, in peace-building and in the care of creation. We will pay close attention to the contribution made by the bishops of Canada, and notably of Québec, to the development and the concrete application of this teaching.

Christian Initiation and Penance : canonical aspects

According to canon 842, § 2, for Christian initiation to be complete, the three sacraments of baptism, confirmation and the Eucharist are required. The entire life of believers is a response, daily lived, to the Good News, along with the need for conversion, as well as reconciliation with one’s neighbour. The importance of the sacrament of penance is rooted in the desire, daily felt, to conform more and more to God’s call.

This course is the equivalent of the course Sacramental Law (DCA 3106) / Droit sacramentel (DCA 3506) given at the Faculty of Canon Law of St. Paul University. .

Christian Initiation and Penance : canonical aspects

According to canon 842, § 2, for Christian initiation to be complete, the three sacraments of baptism, confirmation and the Eucharist are required. The entire life of believers is a response, daily lived, to the Good News, along with the need for conversion, as well as reconciliation with one’s neighbour. The importance of the sacrament of penance is rooted in the desire, daily felt, to conform more and more to God’s call.

This course is the equivalent of the course Sacramental Law (DCA 3106) / Droit sacramentel (DCA 3506) given at the Faculty of Canon Law of St. Paul University. .

Christian Initiation and Penance : canonical aspects

According to canon 842, § 2, for Christian initiation to be complete, the three sacraments of baptism, confirmation and the Eucharist are required. The entire life of believers is a response, daily lived, to the Good News, along with the need for conversion, as well as reconciliation with one’s neighbour. The importance of the sacrament of penance is rooted in the desire, daily felt, to conform more and more to God’s call.

This course is the equivalent of the course Sacramental Law (DCA 3106) / Droit sacramentel (DCA 3506) given at the Faculty of Canon Law of St. Paul University. .

Christian Interpretations of Human History – Undergraduate course

In the last twenty years or so, we have experienced calamities such as the ecological crisis, a pandemic, wars, migrations, famine, racism, etc. Thus many people are asking, more intensely than before, where our world is heading; hence the urgency of identifying and sharing meanings and values. In this course, students will discover different meanings that Christian thinkers have ascribed to human life, both personal and collective.

We shall examine the views of the following thinkers, some at length, other cursorily:

Second Isaiah, Daniel, St. Luke’s Gospel, and Acts of the Apostles; Oscar Cullmann’s thesis about cyclical time and linear time; Augustine on the two cities; Thomas Aquinas and Bossuet on Providence; Catherine of Siena on the conformity to God’s will; Hobbes and Rousseau: three periods in human history; Hegel and Nietzsche: history as taking place necessarily; Ernst Troeltsch on historical knowledge; John Macmurray’s three kinds of society: mechanical, organic, and interpersonal. Arnold Toynbee’s three stages in the life of civilizations: creative minorities, mimesis (freely performed or imposed), and breakdown; Bernard Lonergan on Toynbee; A few chapters by Louis Roy about the main themes of this course; An analysis of our global world. A few political thinkers among the following: Christopher Dawson, Karl Mannheim, Hans-Georg Gadamer, Paul Ricœur, Jean Ladrière, Charles Taylor, Jürgen Habermas, Fred Lawrence.

Christian Interpretations of Human History – Graduate course

In the last twenty years or so, we have experienced calamities such as the ecological crisis, a pandemic, wars, migrations, famine, racism, etc. Thus many people are asking, more intensely than before, where our world is heading; hence the urgency of identifying and sharing meanings and values. In this course, students will discover different meanings that Christian thinkers have ascribed to human life, both personal and collective.

We shall examine the views of the following thinkers, some at length, other cursorily:

Second Isaiah, Daniel, St. Luke’s Gospel, and Acts of the Apostles; Oscar Cullmann’s thesis about cyclical time and linear time; Augustine on the two cities; Thomas Aquinas and Bossuet on Providence; Catherine of Siena on the conformity to God’s will; Hobbes and Rousseau: three periods in human history; Hegel and Nietzsche: history as taking place necessarily; Ernst Troeltsch on historical knowledge; John Macmurray’s three kinds of society: mechanical, organic, and interpersonal. Arnold Toynbee’s three stages in the life of civilizations: creative minorities, mimesis (freely performed or imposed), and breakdown; Bernard Lonergan on Toynbee; A few chapters by Louis Roy about the main themes of this course; An analysis of our global world. A few political thinkers among the following: Christopher Dawson, Karl Mannheim, Hans-Georg Gadamer, Paul Ricœur, Jean Ladrière, Charles Taylor, Jürgen Habermas, Fred Lawrence.

Christology

Online with Regis College

Classes to take place from January 15 to April 16, 2021

Christology

Christology  (online with Regis College)

Classes to take place from January 15 to April 16, 2021

Christology

Christology  (online with Regis College)

Classes to take place from January 15 to April 16, 2021

Christology

Christology  (online with Regis College)

Classes to take place from January 15 to April 16, 2021

Christology

Christology  (online with Regis College)

Classes to take place from January 15 to April 16, 2021

Christology I: Portraits of Jesus

Christology I: Portraits of Jesus

Is there a contemporary Jesus? The figure of Jesus is regularly portrayed anew. Nowadays, historical pictures lead the market. Is there any coherence between the Christ of Paul, the historical Jesus and the Christ of councils? How could we present or encounter Jesus with our contemporary culture? Could it help us reading the first testimonies of faith with a renewed interest? This course offers an inventive way to accomplish that.

Christology I: Portraits of Jesus

Christology I: Portraits of Jesus

Is there a contemporary Jesus? The figure of Jesus is regularly portrayed anew. Nowadays, historical pictures lead the market. Is there any coherence between the Christ of Paul, the historical Jesus and the Christ of councils? How could we present or encounter Jesus with our contemporary culture? Could it help us reading the first testimonies of faith with a renewed interest? This course offers an inventive way to accomplish that.

Christology I: Portraits of Jesus

Christology I: Portraits of Jesus

Is there a contemporary Jesus? The figure of Jesus is regularly portrayed anew. Nowadays, historical pictures lead the market. Is there any coherence between the Christ of Paul, the historical Jesus and the Christ of councils? How could we present or encounter Jesus with our contemporary culture? Could it help us reading the first testimonies of faith with a renewed interest? This course offers an inventive way to accomplish that.

Christology II: Christ of the Christian Tradition

Christology II: Christ of the Christian Tradition

This course deals with the core of Christian faith: the organic coherence of the Creed stemming from Easter; the Incarnation of the Son of God as mission and salvation. This course integrates the major outcomes of the Western Tradition, especially regarding the meaning of the Cross, taking care of ecumenical debates.

Christology II: Christ of the Christian Tradition

Christology II: Christ of the Christian Tradition

This course deals with the core of Christian faith: the organic coherence of the Creed stemming from Easter; the Incarnation of the Son of God as mission and salvation. This course integrates the major outcomes of the Western Tradition, especially regarding the meaning of the Cross, taking care of ecumenical debates.

Christology II: Christ of the Christian Tradition

Christology II: Christ of the Christian Tradition

This course deals with the core of Christian faith: the organic coherence of the Creed stemming from Easter; the Incarnation of the Son of God as mission and salvation. This course integrates the major outcomes of the Western Tradition, especially regarding the meaning of the Cross, taking care of ecumenical debates.

Christology II: Christ of the Christian Tradition

Christology II: Christ of the Christian Tradition

This course deals with the core of Christian faith: the organic coherence of the Creed stemming from Easter; the Incarnation of the Son of God as mission and salvation. This course integrates the major outcomes of the Western Tradition, especially regarding the meaning of the Cross, taking care of ecumenical debates.

Consecrated Life

This course will introduce the students to the historical development of consecrated life in the Church. Through preparatory readings and class lectures, the students will explore different topics to better understand how women and men have desired to follow Christ more closely by living together and binding themselves to a simpler life. Special attention will be devoted to the transformations of religious life through the ages as well as its faculties of adaptation and renewal. Students will study a particular tradition or institute, and share what they have learned with the class.

Consecrated Life

This course will introduce the students to the historical development of consecrated life in the Church. Through preparatory readings and class lectures, the students will explore different topics to better understand how women and men have desired to follow Christ more closely by living together and binding themselves to a simpler life. Special attention will be devoted to the transformations of religious life through the ages as well as its faculties of adaptation and renewal. Students will study a particular tradition or institute, and share what they have learned with the class.

Consecrated Life

This course will introduce the students to the historical development of consecrated life in the Church. Through preparatory readings and class lectures, the students will explore different topics to better understand how women and men have desired to follow Christ more closely by living together and binding themselves to a simpler life. Special attention will be devoted to the transformations of religious life through the ages as well as its faculties of adaptation and renewal. Students will study a particular tradition or institute, and share what they have learned with the class.

Consecrated Life

This course will introduce the students to the historical development of consecrated life in the Church. Through preparatory readings and class lectures, the students will explore different topics to better understand how women and men have desired to follow Christ more closely by living together and binding themselves to a simpler life. Special attention will be devoted to the transformations of religious life through the ages as well as its faculties of adaptation and renewal. Students will study a particular tradition or institute, and share what they have learned with the class.

Contemporary Philosophy of Mind

This course aims at familiarizing students with seminal topics present in the contemporary philosophy of mind debate. The course will be divided into two parts. Part One will focus on the notion of consciousness as presented by such philosophers as Thomas Nagel, Daniel Dennett, David Chalmers, Paul Churchland, Sydney Shoemaker, Derek Parfit, Maria Schetchman, and Daniel Stoljar. In this part of the course, students will be exposed to the theory of qualia, the explanatory gap, the nature of intentionality, and reductionism with regards to personal identity. Part Two will deal with the theories surrounding the mind-body/mind-brain debate, namely dualism, behaviorism, the identity theory, mental causation, and functionalism.

Contemporary Philosophy of Mind

This course aims at familiarizing students with seminal topics present in the contemporary philosophy of mind debate. The course will be divided into two parts. Part One will focus on the notion of consciousness as presented by such philosophers as Thomas Nagel, Daniel Dennett, David Chalmers, Paul Churchland, Sydney Shoemaker, Derek Parfit, Maria Schetchman, and Daniel Stoljar. In this part of the course, students will be exposed to the theory of qualia, the explanatory gap, the nature of intentionality, and reductionism with regards to personal identity. Part Two will deal with the theories surrounding the mind-body/mind-brain debate, namely dualism, behaviorism, the identity theory, mental causation, and functionalism.

Contemporary Philosophy of Mind

This course aims at familiarizing students with seminal topics present in the contemporary philosophy of mind debate. The course will be divided into two parts. Part One will focus on the notion of consciousness as presented by such philosophers as Thomas Nagel, Daniel Dennett, David Chalmers, Paul Churchland, Sydney Shoemaker, Derek Parfit, Maria Schetchman, and Daniel Stoljar. In this part of the course, students will be exposed to the theory of qualia, the explanatory gap, the nature of intentionality, and reductionism with regards to personal identity. Part Two will deal with the theories surrounding the mind-body/mind-brain debate, namely dualism, behaviorism, the identity theory, mental causation, and functionalism.

Contemporary Philosophy of Mind

This course aims at familiarizing students with seminal topics present in the contemporary philosophy of mind debate. The course will be divided into two parts. Part One will focus on the notion of consciousness as presented by such philosophers as Thomas Nagel, Daniel Dennett, David Chalmers, Paul Churchland, Sydney Shoemaker, Derek Parfit, Maria Schetchman, and Daniel Stoljar. In this part of the course, students will be exposed to the theory of qualia, the explanatory gap, the nature of intentionality, and reductionism with regards to personal identity. Part Two will deal with the theories surrounding the mind-body/mind-brain debate, namely dualism, behaviorism, the identity theory, mental causation, and functionalism.

Critical Thinking and Research Methodology

The course aims to develop fundamental skills in reasoning and critical thinking through the study of argument types, logical structures, criteria used in the evaluation of arguments, and forms of fallacious reasoning. Students will also be introduced to the basic elements involved in conducting philosophical and theological research, and will learn about the various phases and major components of a research project.

Critical Thinking and Research Methodology

Critical Thinking and Research Methodology

 

The course aims to develop fundamental skills in reasoning and critical thinking through the study of argument types, logical structures, criteria used in the evaluation of arguments, and forms of fallacious reasoning. Students will also be introduced to the basic elements involved in conducting philosophical and theological research, and will learn about the various phases and major components of a research project.

Critical Thinking and Research Methodology

Critical Thinking and Research Methodology

 

The course aims to develop fundamental skills in reasoning and critical thinking through the study of argument types, logical structures, criteria used in the evaluation of arguments, and forms of fallacious reasoning. Students will also be introduced to the basic elements involved in conducting philosophical and theological research, and will learn about the various phases and major components of a research project.

Current Issues in Ethics

This course serves as a general introduction to the problems of applied ethics. It will propose readings addressing a variety of ethical issues, in society at large, as well as in specialized sectors. Students will survey various issues in ethics, which will enrich their research and understanding in applied ethics.

Current Issues in Ethics

This course serves as a general introduction to the problems of applied ethics. It will propose readings addressing a variety of ethical issues, in society at large, as well as in specialized sectors. Students will survey various issues in ethics, which will enrich their research and understanding in applied ethics.

Current Issues in Ethics

This course serves as a general introduction to the problems of applied ethics. It will propose readings addressing a variety of ethical issues, in society at large, as well as in specialized sectors. Students will survey various issues in ethics, which will enrich their research and understanding in applied ethics.

Current Issues in Ethics

This course serves as a general introduction to the problems of applied ethics. It will propose readings addressing a variety of ethical issues, in society at large, as well as in specialized sectors. Students will survey various issues in ethics, which will enrich their research and understanding in applied ethics.

Current Issues in Ethics II

Ethics of Information Technology

This class will explore some of the key ethical questions raised by current developments in Information Technologies. Possible topics include: copyright, privacy, free speech, commerce and politics. Particular attention will be devoted to a systematic consideration of the relationship(s) between online privacy and autonomy, and the socio-political implications of reduced anonymity in the virtual environment. We may also address the ethicality of hacking, viruses, and pirated software.

Current Issues in Ethics II

Ethics of Information Technology

This class will explore some of the key ethical questions raised by current developments in Information Technologies. Possible topics include: copyright, privacy, free speech, commerce and politics. Particular attention will be devoted to a systematic consideration of the relationship(s) between online privacy and autonomy, and the socio-political implications of reduced anonymity in the virtual environment. We may also address the ethicality of hacking, viruses, and pirated software.

Current Issues in Ethics II

Ethics of Information Technology

This class will explore some of the key ethical questions raised by current developments in Information Technologies. Possible topics include: copyright, privacy, free speech, commerce and politics. Particular attention will be devoted to a systematic consideration of the relationship(s) between online privacy and autonomy, and the socio-political implications of reduced anonymity in the virtual environment. We may also address the ethicality of hacking, viruses, and pirated software.

Current Issues in Ethics II

Ethics of Information Technology

This class will explore some of the key ethical questions raised by current developments in Information Technologies. Possible topics include: copyright, privacy, free speech, commerce and politics. Particular attention will be devoted to a systematic consideration of the relationship(s) between online privacy and autonomy, and the socio-political implications of reduced anonymity in the virtual environment. We may also address the ethicality of hacking, viruses, and pirated software.

Currents in Phenomenology I

This course examines the phenomenological approach to philosophical problems, theoretical or practical. It will include discussions of some seminal works of Edmund Husserl, Martin Heidegger, Hannah Arendt and Maurice Merleau-Ponty.

Currents in Phenomenology I

This course examines the phenomenological approach to philosophical problems, theoretical or practical. It will include discussions of some seminal works of Edmund Husserl, Martin Heidegger, Hannah Arendt and Maurice Merleau-Ponty.

Currents in Phenomenology I

This course examines the phenomenological approach to philosophical problems, theoretical or practical. It will include discussions of some seminal works of Edmund Husserl, Martin Heidegger, Hannah Arendt and Maurice Merleau-Ponty.

Developments in Christian Thought

Developments in Christian Thought

In this course, students will learn about the methods, purposes and characteristics of theology as a field of inquiry and scholarship. The history of Christian theological thinking will be surveyed from the New Testament to the twenty-first century. Through a presentation of significant figures or schools of thought that have contributed and are contributing to theology, students will discover and deepen the various styles of theologizing. The pedagogical approach used in this course will be lecture-based but will include classroom discussions focused on specific readings and personal reflections. The assessment for this course is based on participation, periodic in-class and take home assignments and written essays.

Developments in Christian Thought

Developments in Christian Thought

In this course, students will learn about the methods, purposes and characteristics of theology as a field of inquiry and scholarship. The history of Christian theological thinking will be surveyed from the New Testament to the twenty-first century. Through a presentation of significant figures or schools of thought that have contributed and are contributing to theology, students will discover and deepen the various styles of theologizing. The pedagogical approach used in this course will be lecture-based but will include classroom discussions focused on specific readings and personal reflections. The assessment for this course is based on participation, periodic in-class and take home assignments and written essays.

Developments in Christian Thought

Developments in Christian Thought

In this course, students will learn about the methods, purposes and characteristics of theology as a field of inquiry and scholarship. The history of Christian theological thinking will be surveyed from the New Testament to the twenty-first century. Through a presentation of significant figures or schools of thought that have contributed and are contributing to theology, students will discover and deepen the various styles of theologizing. The pedagogical approach used in this course will be lecture-based but will include classroom discussions focused on specific readings and personal reflections. The assessment for this course is based on participation, periodic in-class and take home assignments and written essays.

Developments in Christian Thought

Developments in Christian Thought

In this course, students will learn about the methods, purposes and characteristics of theology as a field of inquiry and scholarship. The history of Christian theological thinking will be surveyed from the New Testament to the twenty-first century. Through a presentation of significant figures or schools of thought that have contributed and are contributing to theology, students will discover and deepen the various styles of theologizing. The pedagogical approach used in this course will be lecture-based but will include classroom discussions focused on specific readings and personal reflections. The assessment for this course is based on participation, periodic in-class and take home assignments and written essays.

Discussions of Law in the works of St. Thomas Aquinas

This seminar is a close examination of the divine origin of law in different works of Thomas Aquinas. There is, obviously, the presentation of law in the Summa theologiae (ST 1-2.90-108); (ST 2-2.44) (ST 2-2.16), etc.  Earlier than these, there is SCG 3.111-146. In ST 2-2 we have such discussions as q. 122 on the Decalogue as precepts pertaining to justice. Notice also 2-2.64 and following, on vices opposed to the justice of exchange.

Discussions of Law in the works of St. Thomas Aquinas

This seminar is a close examination of the divine origin of law in different works of Thomas Aquinas. There is, obviously, the presentation of law in the Summa theologiae (ST 1-2.90-108); (ST 2-2.44) (ST 2-2.16), etc.  Earlier than these, there is SCG 3.111-146. In ST 2-2 we have such discussions as q. 122 on the Decalogue as precepts pertaining to justice. Notice also 2-2.64 and following, on vices opposed to the justice of exchange.

Discussions of Law in the works of St. Thomas Aquinas

This seminar is a close examination of the divine origin of law in different works of Thomas Aquinas. There is, obviously, the presentation of law in the Summa theologiae (ST 1-2.90-108); (ST 2-2.44) (ST 2-2.16), etc.  Earlier than these, there is SCG 3.111-146. In ST 2-2 we have such discussions as q. 122 on the Decalogue as precepts pertaining to justice. Notice also 2-2.64 and following, on vices opposed to the justice of exchange.

Discussions of Law in the works of St. Thomas Aquinas

This seminar is a close examination of the divine origin of law in different works of Thomas Aquinas. There is, obviously, the presentation of law in the Summa theologiae (ST 1-2.90-108); (ST 2-2.44) (ST 2-2.16), etc.  Earlier than these, there is SCG 3.111-146. In ST 2-2 we have such discussions as q. 122 on the Decalogue as precepts pertaining to justice. Notice also 2-2.64 and following, on vices opposed to the justice of exchange.

Divine and Human Emotions

According to the Biblical narrative, God’s emotions appear to be so human that some wonder how divine God really is. Through description, comparison and analysis, this course will explore both human and divine emotions, so that their differences and affinities may be brought to light. We will focus on the following emotions: desire and envy, joy and pleasure, anger and wrath, sorrow and sympathy, remorse and repentance. The subject matter will be both anthropological and theological in nature.

Divine and Human Emotions

According to the Biblical narrative, God’s emotions appear to be so human that some wonder how divine God really is. Through description, comparison and analysis, this course will explore both human and divine emotions, so that their differences and affinities may be brought to light. We will focus on the following emotions: desire and envy, joy and pleasure, anger and wrath, sorrow and sympathy, remorse and repentance. The subject matter will be both anthropological and theological in nature.

Divine and Human Emotions

According to the Biblical narrative, God’s emotions appear to be so human that some wonder how divine God really is. Through description, comparison and analysis, this course will explore both human and divine emotions, so that their differences and affinities may be brought to light. We will focus on the following emotions: desire and envy, joy and pleasure, anger and wrath, sorrow and sympathy, remorse and repentance. The subject matter will be both anthropological and theological in nature.

Divine and Human Emotions

According to the Biblical narrative, God’s emotions appear to be so human that some wonder how divine God really is. Through description, comparison and analysis, this course will explore both human and divine emotions, so that their differences and affinities may be brought to light. We will focus on the following emotions: desire and envy, joy and pleasure, anger and wrath, sorrow and sympathy, remorse and repentance. The subject matter will be both anthropological and theological in nature.

DTHY 4001

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DTHY 4001

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DTHY 4001

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DTHY 4001

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Empiricism in the 17th and 18th Centuries

A study of the most important ontological and epistemological doctrines of empiricism, as developed within the English-language tradition, mainly through the study of John Locke, George Berkeley and David Hume.

Empiricism in the 17th and 18th Centuries

A study of the most important ontological and epistemological doctrines of empiricism, as developed within the English-language tradition, mainly through the study of John Locke, George Berkeley and David Hume.

Empiricism in the 17th and 18th Centuries

A study of the most important ontological and epistemological doctrines of empiricism, as developed within the English-language tradition, mainly through the study of John Locke, George Berkeley and David Hume.

Empiricism in the 17th and 18th Centuries

A study of the most important ontological and epistemological doctrines of empiricism, as developed within the English-language tradition, mainly through the study of John Locke, George Berkeley and David Hume.

Engaging the Thought of Bernard Lonergan

Philosophically, the goal of this course is to show how an exploration of human intentionality, namely of the human spirit, in its cognitive and affective dimensions, can yield an epistemology and a metaphysics that may be characterized as critical realism.

Theologically, the goal is to show that an exploration of religious, moral and intellectual conversion can ground a rigorous and fruitful reflection on Christian faith. Through the examination of Louis Roy’s recent book on Lonergan and of excerpts from Lonergan’s writings, problems such as historical consciousness, authenticity, meaning, truth and pluralism will be discussed.

Engaging the Thought of Bernard Lonergan

Philosophically, the goal of this course is to show how an exploration of human intentionality, namely of the human spirit, in its cognitive and affective dimensions, can yield an epistemology and a metaphysics that may be characterized as critical realism.

Theologically, the goal is to show that an exploration of religious, moral and intellectual conversion can ground a rigorous and fruitful reflection on Christian faith. Through the examination of Louis Roy’s recent book on Lonergan and of excerpts from Lonergan’s writings, problems such as historical consciousness, authenticity, meaning, truth and pluralism will be discussed.

Engaging the Thought of Bernard Lonergan

Philosophically, the goal of this course is to show how an exploration of human intentionality, namely of the human spirit, in its cognitive and affective dimensions, can yield an epistemology and a metaphysics that may be characterized as critical realism.

Theologically, the goal is to show that an exploration of religious, moral and intellectual conversion can ground a rigorous and fruitful reflection on Christian faith. Through the examination of Louis Roy’s recent book on Lonergan and of excerpts from Lonergan’s writings, problems such as historical consciousness, authenticity, meaning, truth and pluralism will be discussed.

Engaging the Thought of Bernard Lonergan

Philosophically, the goal of this course is to show how an exploration of human intentionality, namely of the human spirit, in its cognitive and affective dimensions, can yield an epistemology and a metaphysics that may be characterized as critical realism.

Theologically, the goal is to show that an exploration of religious, moral and intellectual conversion can ground a rigorous and fruitful reflection on Christian faith. Through the examination of Louis Roy’s recent book on Lonergan and of excerpts from Lonergan’s writings, problems such as historical consciousness, authenticity, meaning, truth and pluralism will be discussed.

Epistemology

Knowledge —its nature, status, conditions and limits— has always been a fundamental issue in Philosophy. Considering the problem as stated in ancient Philosophy, this course explores some of the main views of knowledge in modern and contemporary traditions. Special attention will be paid to Hume’s sceptical position and to the ensuing responses, notably in Kant and in analytical Philosophy.

Epistemology

Knowledge —its nature, status, conditions and limits— has always been a fundamental issue in Philosophy. Considering the problem as stated in ancient Philosophy, this course explores some of the main views of knowledge in modern and contemporary traditions. Special attention will be paid to Hume’s sceptical position and to the ensuing responses, notably in Kant and in analytical Philosophy.

Epistemology

Knowledge —its nature, status, conditions and limits— has always been a fundamental issue in Philosophy. Considering the problem as stated in ancient Philosophy, this course explores some of the main views of knowledge in modern and contemporary traditions. Special attention will be paid to Hume’s sceptical position and to the ensuing responses, notably in Kant and in analytical Philosophy.

Epistemology after Descartes: Replies to Skepticism

~~Starting from the modern skeptical crisis, from Erasmus to Hume, we look at the Cartesian solution and the critiques and counter-proposals it engendered. Participants will be invited to explore the various argumentative strategies in the history of this problem that still challenges philosophy, epistemology, metaphysics, philosophy of mind and philosophy of religion. Depending on the research interests of participants, themes for study will include among others, Descartes and foundationalism, Critiques of Cartesian foundationalism, Modern empiricism, Enlightenment answers to skepticism, Transcendental philosophy and skepticism, skepticism and positivism in Auguste Comte, early analytical philosophy on skepticism, from Russell to Popper, Wittgenstein and philosophy of language on skepticism, naturalized epistemology, coherentism, contextualism, feminist epistemology.

Epistemology after Descartes: Replies to Skepticism

~~Starting from the modern skeptical crisis, from Erasmus to Hume, we look at the Cartesian solution and the critiques and counter-proposals it engendered. Participants will be invited to explore the various argumentative strategies in the history of this problem that still challenges philosophy, epistemology, metaphysics, philosophy of mind and philosophy of religion. Depending on the research interests of participants, themes for study will include among others, Descartes and foundationalism, Critiques of Cartesian foundationalism, Modern empiricism, Enlightenment answers to skepticism, Transcendental philosophy and skepticism, skepticism and positivism in Auguste Comte, early analytical philosophy on skepticism, from Russell to Popper, Wittgenstein and philosophy of language on skepticism, naturalized epistemology, coherentism, contextualism, feminist epistemology.

Epistemology after Descartes: Replies to Skepticism

~~Starting from the modern skeptical crisis, from Erasmus to Hume, we look at the Cartesian solution and the critiques and counter-proposals it engendered. Participants will be invited to explore the various argumentative strategies in the history of this problem that still challenges philosophy, epistemology, metaphysics, philosophy of mind and philosophy of religion. Depending on the research interests of participants, themes for study will include among others, Descartes and foundationalism, Critiques of Cartesian foundationalism, Modern empiricism, Enlightenment answers to skepticism, Transcendental philosophy and skepticism, skepticism and positivism in Auguste Comte, early analytical philosophy on skepticism, from Russell to Popper, Wittgenstein and philosophy of language on skepticism, naturalized epistemology, coherentism, contextualism, feminist epistemology.

Epistemology after Descartes: Replies to Skepticism

~~Starting from the modern skeptical crisis, from Erasmus to Hume, we look at the Cartesian solution and the critiques and counter-proposals it engendered. Participants will be invited to explore the various argumentative strategies in the history of this problem that still challenges philosophy, epistemology, metaphysics, philosophy of mind and philosophy of religion. Depending on the research interests of participants, themes for study will include among others, Descartes and foundationalism, Critiques of Cartesian foundationalism, Modern empiricism, Enlightenment answers to skepticism, Transcendental philosophy and skepticism, skepticism and positivism in Auguste Comte, early analytical philosophy on skepticism, from Russell to Popper, Wittgenstein and philosophy of language on skepticism, naturalized epistemology, coherentism, contextualism, feminist epistemology.

Epistemology after Descartes: Replies to Skepticism

~~Starting from the modern skeptical crisis, from Erasmus to Hume, we look at the Cartesian solution and the critiques and counter-proposals it engendered. Participants will be invited to explore the various argumentative strategies in the history of this problem that still challenges philosophy, epistemology, metaphysics, philosophy of mind and philosophy of religion. Depending on the research interests of participants, themes for study will include among others, Descartes and foundationalism, Critiques of Cartesian foundationalism, Modern empiricism, Enlightenment answers to skepticism, Transcendental philosophy and skepticism, skepticism and positivism in Auguste Comte, early analytical philosophy on skepticism, from Russell to Popper, Wittgenstein and philosophy of language on skepticism, naturalized epistemology, coherentism, contextualism, feminist epistemology.

Epistemology after Descartes: Replies to Skepticism

~~Starting from the modern skeptical crisis, from Erasmus to Hume, we look at the Cartesian solution and the critiques and counter-proposals it engendered. Participants will be invited to explore the various argumentative strategies in the history of this problem that still challenges philosophy, epistemology, metaphysics, philosophy of mind and philosophy of religion. Depending on the research interests of participants, themes for study will include among others, Descartes and foundationalism, Critiques of Cartesian foundationalism, Modern empiricism, Enlightenment answers to skepticism, Transcendental philosophy and skepticism, skepticism and positivism in Auguste Comte, early analytical philosophy on skepticism, from Russell to Popper, Wittgenstein and philosophy of language on skepticism, naturalized epistemology, coherentism, contextualism, feminist epistemology.

Epistemology after Descartes: Replies to Skepticism

~~Starting from the modern skeptical crisis, from Erasmus to Hume, we look at the Cartesian solution and the critiques and counter-proposals it engendered. Participants will be invited to explore the various argumentative strategies in the history of this problem that still challenges philosophy, epistemology, metaphysics, philosophy of mind and philosophy of religion. Depending on the research interests of participants, themes for study will include among others, Descartes and foundationalism, Critiques of Cartesian foundationalism, Modern empiricism, Enlightenment answers to skepticism, Transcendental philosophy and skepticism, skepticism and positivism in Auguste Comte, early analytical philosophy on skepticism, from Russell to Popper, Wittgenstein and philosophy of language on skepticism, naturalized epistemology, coherentism, contextualism, feminist epistemology.

Epistemology after Descartes: Replies to Skepticism

~~Starting from the modern skeptical crisis, from Erasmus to Hume, we look at the Cartesian solution and the critiques and counter-proposals it engendered. Participants will be invited to explore the various argumentative strategies in the history of this problem that still challenges philosophy, epistemology, metaphysics, philosophy of mind and philosophy of religion. Depending on the research interests of participants, themes for study will include among others, Descartes and foundationalism, Critiques of Cartesian foundationalism, Modern empiricism, Enlightenment answers to skepticism, Transcendental philosophy and skepticism, skepticism and positivism in Auguste Comte, early analytical philosophy on skepticism, from Russell to Popper, Wittgenstein and philosophy of language on skepticism, naturalized epistemology, coherentism, contextualism, feminist epistemology.

Epistle of James and Social Justice

Epistle of James and Social Justice

The first verses of the Epistle engages the Christians to grow in faith while striving towards a perfect conduct because faith itself can only the shown by its works. Chapters 3 – 5 build on the teaching of the Old Testament prophets; the rich and the powerful should treat the poor and the powerless with justice and not take advantage of their low social status. The whole Epistle gives a teaching on the social requirements of faith and provides a source of inspiration for the social commitment of the Christian today.

Epistle of James and Social Justice

Epistle of James and Social Justice

The first verses of the Epistle engages the Christians to grow in faith while striving towards a perfect conduct because faith itself can only the shown by its works. Chapters 3 – 5 build on the teaching of the Old Testament prophets; the rich and the powerful should treat the poor and the powerless with justice and not take advantage of their low social status. The whole Epistle gives a teaching on the social requirements of faith and provides a source of inspiration for the social commitment of the Christian today.

Epistle of James and Social Justice

Epistle of James and Social Justice

The first verses of the Epistle engages the Christians to grow in faith while striving towards a perfect conduct because faith itself can only the shown by its works. Chapters 3 – 5 build on the teaching of the Old Testament prophets; the rich and the powerful should treat the poor and the powerless with justice and not take advantage of their low social status. The whole Epistle gives a teaching on the social requirements of faith and provides a source of inspiration for the social commitment of the Christian today.

Epistle of James and Social Justice

Epistle of James and Social Justice

The first verses of the Epistle engages the Christians to grow in faith while striving towards a perfect conduct because faith itself can only the shown by its works. Chapters 3 – 5 build on the teaching of the Old Testament prophets; the rich and the powerful should treat the poor and the powerless with justice and not take advantage of their low social status. The whole Epistle gives a teaching on the social requirements of faith and provides a source of inspiration for the social commitment of the Christian today.

Ethics: Contemporary Issues in End-of-Life Care

The medicalization of the end of life has given rise to new situations and questions that are currently much debated, both in society and in ecclesial circles: medical aid in dying, withholding or withdrawing life-sustaining treatment, therapeutic obstinacy, living wills, palliative care, permanent vegetative states, etc. These questions, deeply marked by complexity and uncertainty, require clarification and deeper analysis. This seminar aims to reflect on the ethical, spiritual and theological issues encountered in end-of-life situations and to examine frameworks and landmarks for developing meaningful practices of moral discernment and spiritual and pastoral accompaniment.

Ethics: Contemporary Issues in End-of-Life Care

The medicalization of the end of life has given rise to new situations and questions that are currently much debated, both in society and in ecclesial circles: medical aid in dying, withholding or withdrawing life-sustaining treatment, therapeutic obstinacy, living wills, palliative care, permanent vegetative states, etc. These questions, deeply marked by complexity and uncertainty, require clarification and deeper analysis. This seminar aims to reflect on the ethical, spiritual and theological issues encountered in end-of-life situations and to examine frameworks and landmarks for developing meaningful practices of moral discernment and spiritual and pastoral accompaniment.

Ethics: Contemporary Issues in End-of-Life Care

The medicalization of the end of life has given rise to new situations and questions that are currently much debated, both in society and in ecclesial circles: medical aid in dying, withholding or withdrawing life-sustaining treatment, therapeutic obstinacy, living wills, palliative care, permanent vegetative states, etc. These questions, deeply marked by complexity and uncertainty, require clarification and deeper analysis. This seminar aims to reflect on the ethical, spiritual and theological issues encountered in end-of-life situations and to examine frameworks and landmarks for developing meaningful practices of moral discernment and spiritual and pastoral accompaniment.

Ethics: Contemporary Issues in End-of-Life Care

The medicalization of the end of life has given rise to new situations and questions that are currently much debated, both in society and in ecclesial circles: medical aid in dying, withholding or withdrawing life-sustaining treatment, therapeutic obstinacy, living wills, palliative care, permanent vegetative states, etc. These questions, deeply marked by complexity and uncertainty, require clarification and deeper analysis. This seminar aims to reflect on the ethical, spiritual and theological issues encountered in end-of-life situations and to examine frameworks and landmarks for developing meaningful practices of moral discernment and spiritual and pastoral accompaniment.

Ethics I

Ethics I

This course proposes a study of the main alternatives in ethics today, especially concerned with the following questions: what is really important in life? What is ultimately the right way of living? How can we become better equipped to distinguish between right and wrong? What are the main concepts which operate in the different ethical theories? Examples and cases from applied ethics.

Ethics I

Ethics I

This course proposes a study of the main alternatives in ethics today, especially concerned with the following questions: what is really important in life? What is ultimately the right way of living? How can we become better equipped to distinguish between right and wrong? What are the main concepts which operate in the different ethical theories? Examples and cases from applied ethics.

Ethics I

Ethics I

This course proposes a study of the main alternatives in ethics today, especially concerned with the following questions: what is really important in life? What is ultimately the right way of living? How can we become better equipped to distinguish between right and wrong? What are the main concepts which operate in the different ethical theories? Examples and cases from applied ethics.

Ethics I

Ethics I

This course proposes a study of the main alternatives in ethics today, especially concerned with the following questions: what is really important in life? What is ultimately the right way of living? How can we become better equipped to distinguish between right and wrong? What are the main concepts which operate in the different ethical theories? Examples and cases from applied ethics.

Ethics II

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Ethics II

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Ethics II

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Ethics II

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Existential Philosophy

“God is dead. God remains dead. And we have killed him. How shall we comfort ourselves, the murderers of all murderers?” This famous line uttered by Nietzsche’s madman captures an idea that resonates throughout existentialist thought – even if God exists, His existence cannot be presupposed as a premise, and cannot be proven by rational means. Consequently, the re-valuation of all values – how we are to find meaning and purpose in our existence, and how we are to determine how we ought to live – becomes one of the most pressing issues for modern humankind. The goal of existentialism was to avoid slipping into nihilism when confronted with the death of God. In this course, we will consider what it means to be free and the weight of our responsibility for our choices and actions (1) in the absence of an objective, transcendent, pre-determined morality and (2) in the presence of others. Philosophers covered will include Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Sartre and Beauvoir.

Experiential learning in Voluntary Work

Experiential learning in Voluntary Work

This formative activity consist in serving as a volunteer for DUC (Library service, research, mentoring, sports or arts), by presenting a project and providing the service or activities. This is followed by a research paper or experience report supervised and evaluated by a Professor.

For fall and winter sessions

 

Experiential learning in Voluntary Work

Experiential learning in Voluntary Work

This formative activity consist in serving as a volunteer for DUC (Library service, research, mentoring, sports or arts), by presenting a project and providing the service or activities. This is followed by a research paper or experience report supervised and evaluated by a Professor.

For fall and winter sessions

 

Experiential learning in Voluntary Work

Experiential learning in Voluntary Work

This formative activity consist in serving as a volunteer for DUC (Library service, research, mentoring, sports or arts), by presenting a project and providing the service or activities. This is followed by a research paper or experience report supervised and evaluated by a Professor.

For fall and winter sessions

 

Experiential learning in Voluntary Work

Experiential learning in Voluntary Work

This formative activity consist in serving as a volunteer for DUC (Library service, research, mentoring, sports or arts), by presenting a project and providing the service or activities. This is followed by a research paper or experience report supervised and evaluated by a Professor.

For fall and winter sessions

 

Faith

The following questions will be studied: Biblical faith, which is an answer to the Word. Faith as a relation to the God of grace and truth, since God is the principle and object of faith.  Then faith as acknowledgement and free undertaking; and the relationship between faith and testimony.

 

Faith

The following questions will be studied: Biblical faith, which is an answer to the Word. Faith as a relation to the God of grace and truth, since God is the principle and object of faith.  Then faith as acknowledgement and free undertaking; and the relationship between faith and testimony.

 

Faith

The following questions will be studied: Biblical faith, which is an answer to the Word. Faith as a relation to the God of grace and truth, since God is the principle and object of faith.  Then faith as acknowledgement and free undertaking; and the relationship between faith and testimony.

 

Faith

The following questions will be studied: Biblical faith, which is an answer to the Word. Faith as a relation to the God of grace and truth, since God is the principle and object of faith.  Then faith as acknowledgement and free undertaking; and the relationship between faith and testimony.

 

God in St. Thomas Aquinas

This is a seminar in practical exegesis of the writings of Saint Thomas Aquinas. We will review: 1) questions of historiography and historical context; 2) medieval theories of language, including the practices of grammar, dialectic and rhetoric; 3) pedagogical practices of the university; 4) Aquinas' use of philosophical tools for understanding theological mysteries; 5) key principles of theological method according to Thomas Aquinas; and 6) various types of writings and their responsible exegesis.

God in St. Thomas Aquinas

This is a seminar in practical exegesis of the writings of Saint Thomas Aquinas. We will review: 1) questions of historiography and historical context; 2) medieval theories of language, including the practices of grammar, dialectic and rhetoric; 3) pedagogical practices of the university; 4) Aquinas' use of philosophical tools for understanding theological mysteries; 5) key principles of theological method according to Thomas Aquinas; and 6) various types of writings and their responsible exegesis.

God in St. Thomas Aquinas

This is a seminar in practical exegesis of the writings of Saint Thomas Aquinas. We will review: 1) questions of historiography and historical context; 2) medieval theories of language, including the practices of grammar, dialectic and rhetoric; 3) pedagogical practices of the university; 4) Aquinas' use of philosophical tools for understanding theological mysteries; 5) key principles of theological method according to Thomas Aquinas; and 6) various types of writings and their responsible exegesis.

God in St. Thomas Aquinas

This is a seminar in practical exegesis of the writings of Saint Thomas Aquinas. We will review: 1) questions of historiography and historical context; 2) medieval theories of language, including the practices of grammar, dialectic and rhetoric; 3) pedagogical practices of the university; 4) Aquinas' use of philosophical tools for understanding theological mysteries; 5) key principles of theological method according to Thomas Aquinas; and 6) various types of writings and their responsible exegesis.

Hegel

Hegel’s systematic approach to philosophy earned him the title of being the “German Aristotle.” Few philosophers in the past two hundred years have had as much influence on philosophy and intellectual culture in general as Hegel. Through a careful reading of parts of the Encyclopedia of the Philosophical Sciences and some other major Hegelian texts students will learn how he transformed modern philosophy in terms of its approach to logic, critical theory, history, and the social sciences in general. In this course students will learn to identify and explain key concepts in Hegel’s dialectico-speculative philosophy. By the end of the course students will be acquainted with Hegel’s basic concepts of logical and mental development, In addition, students will learn how to explain the principal features of Hegel’s political philosophy as well as identify his unique views on aesthetics or his philosophy of fine art, his understanding of religion as fundamentally figurative representation, and how and why he thought philosophy stands at the pinnacle of absolute mind.

History of Analytic Philosophy and Politics

The History of Analytic Philosophy and its Relationship to the 20th and 21st Century Political Climate

The course will have two main goals. First, to dispel the myth that Analytic philosophy is ahistorical. And second, to expose the fact that academia has always had political relevance. We will look at both some of the classical figures of Analytic philosophy such as G.E. Moore, Bertrand Russell, Rudolf Carnap, Ludwig Wittgestein, and their contemporary counter-parts in the face of John Dewey, Richard Rorty, Kwame Appiah, and Judith Butler, to name but a few, and trace, through their own original published works (and private correspondence where applicable), their political visions for both the university as well as society at large.

History of Analytic Philosophy and Politics

The History of Analytic Philosophy and its Relationship to the 20th and 21st Century Political Climate

The course will have two main goals. First, to dispel the myth that Analytic philosophy is ahistorical. And second, to expose the fact that academia has always had political relevance. We will look at both some of the classical figures of Analytic philosophy such as G.E. Moore, Bertrand Russell, Rudolf Carnap, Ludwig Wittgestein, and their contemporary counter-parts in the face of John Dewey, Richard Rorty, Kwame Appiah, and Judith Butler, to name but a few, and trace, through their own original published works (and private correspondence where applicable), their political visions for both the university as well as society at large.

History of Analytic Philosophy and Politics

The History of Analytic Philosophy and its Relationship to the 20th and 21st Century Political Climate

The course will have two main goals. First, to dispel the myth that Analytic philosophy is ahistorical. And second, to expose the fact that academia has always had political relevance. We will look at both some of the classical figures of Analytic philosophy such as G.E. Moore, Bertrand Russell, Rudolf Carnap, Ludwig Wittgestein, and their contemporary counter-parts in the face of John Dewey, Richard Rorty, Kwame Appiah, and Judith Butler, to name but a few, and trace, through their own original published works (and private correspondence where applicable), their political visions for both the university as well as society at large.

History of Analytic Philosophy and Politics

The History of Analytic Philosophy and its Relationship to the 20th and 21st Century Political Climate

The course will have two main goals. First, to dispel the myth that Analytic philosophy is ahistorical. And second, to expose the fact that academia has always had political relevance. We will look at both some of the classical figures of Analytic philosophy such as G.E. Moore, Bertrand Russell, Rudolf Carnap, Ludwig Wittgestein, and their contemporary counter-parts in the face of John Dewey, Richard Rorty, Kwame Appiah, and Judith Butler, to name but a few, and trace, through their own original published works (and private correspondence where applicable), their political visions for both the university as well as society at large.

History of Ideas I. The Rise of Ancient Civilisation

History of Ideas I. The Rise of Ancient Civilisation

From Prehistory to History. Ancient Egypt: monarchy and social structures. The immortality of the soul. The kingdoms of Mesopotamia: Sumerians and Amorites. The Epic of Gilgamesh and the Code of Hammurabi. The universal empire of Persia. The Zoroastrianism. Ancient Greece: the political structures of the Mycenaean Society. The Iliad and the Odyssey. The notion of Polis. Athens: democracy and social knowledge. The Sophists. Politics in Socrates, Plato and Aristotle. The educative ideas of Isocrates. Rome: the idea of a universal empire. Rome and the laws. The philosophical ideas of Cicero and Seneca.

History of Ideas I. The Rise of Ancient Civilisation

History of Ideas I. The Rise of Ancient Civilisation

From Prehistory to History. Ancient Egypt: monarchy and social structures. The immortality of the soul. The kingdoms of Mesopotamia: Sumerians and Amorites. The Epic of Gilgamesh and the Code of Hammurabi. The universal empire of Persia. The Zoroastrianism. Ancient Greece: the political structures of the Mycenaean Society. The Iliad and the Odyssey. The notion of Polis. Athens: democracy and social knowledge. The Sophists. Politics in Socrates, Plato and Aristotle. The educative ideas of Isocrates. Rome: the idea of a universal empire. Rome and the laws. The philosophical ideas of Cicero and Seneca.

History of Ideas I. The Rise of Ancient Civilisation

History of Ideas I. The Rise of Ancient Civilisation

From Prehistory to History. Ancient Egypt: monarchy and social structures. The immortality of the soul. The kingdoms of Mesopotamia: Sumerians and Amorites. The Epic of Gilgamesh and the Code of Hammurabi. The universal empire of Persia. The Zoroastrianism. Ancient Greece: the political structures of the Mycenaean Society. The Iliad and the Odyssey. The notion of Polis. Athens: democracy and social knowledge. The Sophists. Politics in Socrates, Plato and Aristotle. The educative ideas of Isocrates. Rome: the idea of a universal empire. Rome and the laws. The philosophical ideas of Cicero and Seneca.

History of Ideas I. The Rise of Ancient Civilisation

History of Ideas I. The Rise of Ancient Civilisation

From Prehistory to History. Ancient Egypt: monarchy and social structures. The immortality of the soul. The kingdoms of Mesopotamia: Sumerians and Amorites. The Epic of Gilgamesh and the Code of Hammurabi. The universal empire of Persia. The Zoroastrianism. Ancient Greece: the political structures of the Mycenaean Society. The Iliad and the Odyssey. The notion of Polis. Athens: democracy and social knowledge. The Sophists. Politics in Socrates, Plato and Aristotle. The educative ideas of Isocrates. Rome: the idea of a universal empire. Rome and the laws. The philosophical ideas of Cicero and Seneca.

History of Ideas III. Modern Thought

History of Ideas III. Modern Thought

The Renaissance: its origins. The ideal of liberty and the emergence of humanism. Arts and modern capitalism. The age of princes. Machiavelli: man’s nature and political morality. Reformation and the birth of European States. Lutheranism and absolutism. The age of discoveries and a new conception of the universe. Counter Reformation and constitutionalism: Francisco Suárez and the natural-law theory of State. Society, culture, theater and literature in 16th and 17th centuries. William Shakespeare and Miguel de Cervantes. Science and philosophy: Francis Bacon, Isaac Newton and Rene Descartes. The English revolution: John Locke and the parliamentarian theory. The Enlightenment. The Encyclopedia. Rationalism and sentimentalism: Jean-Jacques Rousseau. Napoleon and the end of the Holy Roman Empire.

History of Ideas III. Modern Thought

History of Ideas III. Modern Thought

The Renaissance: its origins. The ideal of liberty and the emergence of humanism. Arts and modern capitalism. The age of princes. Machiavelli: man’s nature and political morality. Reformation and the birth of European States. Lutheranism and absolutism. The age of discoveries and a new conception of the universe. Counter Reformation and constitutionalism: Francisco Suárez and the natural-law theory of State. Society, culture, theater and literature in 16th and 17th centuries. William Shakespeare and Miguel de Cervantes. Science and philosophy: Francis Bacon, Isaac Newton and Rene Descartes. The English revolution: John Locke and the parliamentarian theory. The Enlightenment. The Encyclopedia. Rationalism and sentimentalism: Jean-Jacques Rousseau. Napoleon and the end of the Holy Roman Empire.

History of Ideas III. Modern Thought

History of Ideas III. Modern Thought

The Renaissance: its origins. The ideal of liberty and the emergence of humanism. Arts and modern capitalism. The age of princes. Machiavelli: man’s nature and political morality. Reformation and the birth of European States. Lutheranism and absolutism. The age of discoveries and a new conception of the universe. Counter Reformation and constitutionalism: Francisco Suárez and the natural-law theory of State. Society, culture, theater and literature in 16th and 17th centuries. William Shakespeare and Miguel de Cervantes. Science and philosophy: Francis Bacon, Isaac Newton and Rene Descartes. The English revolution: John Locke and the parliamentarian theory. The Enlightenment. The Encyclopedia. Rationalism and sentimentalism: Jean-Jacques Rousseau. Napoleon and the end of the Holy Roman Empire.

History of Ideas III. Modern Thought

History of Ideas III. Modern Thought

The Renaissance: its origins. The ideal of liberty and the emergence of humanism. Arts and modern capitalism. The age of princes. Machiavelli: man’s nature and political morality. Reformation and the birth of European States. Lutheranism and absolutism. The age of discoveries and a new conception of the universe. Counter Reformation and constitutionalism: Francisco Suárez and the natural-law theory of State. Society, culture, theater and literature in 16th and 17th centuries. William Shakespeare and Miguel de Cervantes. Science and philosophy: Francis Bacon, Isaac Newton and Rene Descartes. The English revolution: John Locke and the parliamentarian theory. The Enlightenment. The Encyclopedia. Rationalism and sentimentalism: Jean-Jacques Rousseau. Napoleon and the end of the Holy Roman Empire.

Holiness, Sanctity and Saint-Making : A Catholic Exploration

What are the Scriptural, theological and canonical definitions of holiness? What were the different models of sanctity through the ages? Who decides who is worthy of being proclaimed a saint? From martyr to mystic and ascetic to activist, variations of holiness will be examined in relation to the regions, periods, and interests that shaped them. The course provides both a chronological and an interdisciplinary overview of sanctity from the New Testament to the present. Through preparatory readings and class lectures, the students will develop knowledge on these different aspects, which they will deepen by researching and reporting to the class on a specific saint, and by writing a research paper on a specific topic of their choice.

Hope and Charity

This course offers a reflection on the theological notions of hope and charity in relation with the development of the moral life. Throughout a survey of biblical sources and of some theological developments of the Tradition, the lectures aim at understanding the nature and meaning of the christian hope and charity, by analyzing the conditions, rooting points and multiple expressions of these theological realities in the moral and spiritual life of Christians and in the Church.

 

Hope and Charity

This course offers a reflection on the theological notions of hope and charity in relation with the development of the moral life. Throughout a survey of biblical sources and of some theological developments of the Tradition, the lectures aim at understanding the nature and meaning of the christian hope and charity, by analyzing the conditions, rooting points and multiple expressions of these theological realities in the moral and spiritual life of Christians and in the Church.

 

Hope and Charity

This course offers a reflection on the theological notions of hope and charity in relation with the development of the moral life. Throughout a survey of biblical sources and of some theological developments of the Tradition, the lectures aim at understanding the nature and meaning of the christian hope and charity, by analyzing the conditions, rooting points and multiple expressions of these theological realities in the moral and spiritual life of Christians and in the Church.

 

Hope and Charity

This course offers a reflection on the theological notions of hope and charity in relation with the development of the moral life. Throughout a survey of biblical sources and of some theological developments of the Tradition, the lectures aim at understanding the nature and meaning of the christian hope and charity, by analyzing the conditions, rooting points and multiple expressions of these theological realities in the moral and spiritual life of Christians and in the Church.

 

Husserl’s Ideas I

Husserl’s Ideas I

 

Husserl’s Ideas for a Pure Phenomenology and Phenomenological Philosophy (1913) is one of the most important philosophical texts of the twentieth century. It is the first of Husserl’s published works to present his transcendental phenomenology and to argue that it is the fundamental science of philosophy. In Ideas I, Husserl introduces numerous concepts that are central to his mature thought: the principle of all principles, the phenomenological epoché and reduction, pure consciousness, the natural and phenomenological attitudes, and noema. It this text Husserl also argues for a form of idealism – a position that was the source of much controversy among his readers. This course will consist of a detailed reading of Ideas I as well as contemporary commentaries on the topics and problems presented therein.

Husserl’s Ideas I

Husserl’s Ideas I

 

Husserl’s Ideas for a Pure Phenomenology and Phenomenological Philosophy (1913) is one of the most important philosophical texts of the twentieth century. It is the first of Husserl’s published works to present his transcendental phenomenology and to argue that it is the fundamental science of philosophy. In Ideas I, Husserl introduces numerous concepts that are central to his mature thought: the principle of all principles, the phenomenological epoché and reduction, pure consciousness, the natural and phenomenological attitudes, and noema. It this text Husserl also argues for a form of idealism – a position that was the source of much controversy among his readers. This course will consist of a detailed reading of Ideas I as well as contemporary commentaries on the topics and problems presented therein.

Husserl’s Ideas I

Husserl’s Ideas I

 

Husserl’s Ideas for a Pure Phenomenology and Phenomenological Philosophy (1913) is one of the most important philosophical texts of the twentieth century. It is the first of Husserl’s published works to present his transcendental phenomenology and to argue that it is the fundamental science of philosophy. In Ideas I, Husserl introduces numerous concepts that are central to his mature thought: the principle of all principles, the phenomenological epoché and reduction, pure consciousness, the natural and phenomenological attitudes, and noema. It this text Husserl also argues for a form of idealism – a position that was the source of much controversy among his readers. This course will consist of a detailed reading of Ideas I as well as contemporary commentaries on the topics and problems presented therein.

Husserl’s Ideas I

Husserl’s Ideas I

 

Husserl’s Ideas for a Pure Phenomenology and Phenomenological Philosophy (1913) is one of the most important philosophical texts of the twentieth century. It is the first of Husserl’s published works to present his transcendental phenomenology and to argue that it is the fundamental science of philosophy. In Ideas I, Husserl introduces numerous concepts that are central to his mature thought: the principle of all principles, the phenomenological epoché and reduction, pure consciousness, the natural and phenomenological attitudes, and noema. It this text Husserl also argues for a form of idealism – a position that was the source of much controversy among his readers. This course will consist of a detailed reading of Ideas I as well as contemporary commentaries on the topics and problems presented therein.

”In the Beginning”: Gen 1-11

''In the Beginning'': Gen 1-11

For centuries, the first chapters of the book of Genesis have been misunderstood because they were read as historical accounts. When science grew stronger in the 19th century and archeological discoveries “seemed” to contradict the Bible, the famous conflict began. This course will first propose an exegetical approach for a more accurate reading of Gen 1–11. Then it will study more in details the main texts: the two so-called Creation Narratives (Gen 1–2); the so-called Original Sin (Gen 3); the Cain and Abel narrative (Gen 4); the Great Flood (Gen 6–9); the Tower of Babel (Gen 11) and the Genealogies (Gen 5; 10).

”In the Beginning”: Gen 1-11

''In the Beginning'': Gen 1-11

For centuries, the first chapters of the book of Genesis have been misunderstood because they were read as historical accounts. When science grew stronger in the 19th century and archeological discoveries “seemed” to contradict the Bible, the famous conflict began. This course will first propose an exegetical approach for a more accurate reading of Gen 1–11. Then it will study more in details the main texts: the two so-called Creation Narratives (Gen 1–2); the so-called Original Sin (Gen 3); the Cain and Abel narrative (Gen 4); the Great Flood (Gen 6–9); the Tower of Babel (Gen 11) and the Genealogies (Gen 5; 10).

”In the Beginning”: Gen 1-11

''In the Beginning'': Gen 1-11

For centuries, the first chapters of the book of Genesis have been misunderstood because they were read as historical accounts. When science grew stronger in the 19th century and archeological discoveries “seemed” to contradict the Bible, the famous conflict began. This course will first propose an exegetical approach for a more accurate reading of Gen 1–11. Then it will study more in details the main texts: the two so-called Creation Narratives (Gen 1–2); the so-called Original Sin (Gen 3); the Cain and Abel narrative (Gen 4); the Great Flood (Gen 6–9); the Tower of Babel (Gen 11) and the Genealogies (Gen 5; 10).

”In the Beginning”: Gen 1-11

''In the Beginning'': Gen 1-11

For centuries, the first chapters of the book of Genesis have been misunderstood because they were read as historical accounts. When science grew stronger in the 19th century and archeological discoveries “seemed” to contradict the Bible, the famous conflict began. This course will first propose an exegetical approach for a more accurate reading of Gen 1–11. Then it will study more in details the main texts: the two so-called Creation Narratives (Gen 1–2); the so-called Original Sin (Gen 3); the Cain and Abel narrative (Gen 4); the Great Flood (Gen 6–9); the Tower of Babel (Gen 11) and the Genealogies (Gen 5; 10).

Interiority and Life of Prayer

This course will offer students an opportunity, first, to explore their own interiority, thanks to the self-knowledge provided by the Canadian Jesuit Bernard Lonergan; and second, to identify more clearly their difficulties in prayer, their own way of praying, and possibly to modify it. Various views on prayer will be examined, mainly in the Bible, among a few ancient and medieval authors, in St. Thomas Aquinas, and among modern prayerful people. Spiritual and psychological aspects of maturing in prayer will also be discussed.

Introduction to Applied Ethics

Introduction to Applied Ethics

This course will look at the fundamental approaches and methods in applied ethics. It will introduce students to the case study method and emphasize decision-making and decision theory in ethics. The course will also look at effective ethics programmes for organizations, ethics codes, professional ethics and other measures and activities in the organizational world.

Introduction to Applied Ethics

Introduction to Applied Ethics

This course will look at the fundamental approaches and methods in applied ethics. It will introduce students to the case study method and emphasize decision-making and decision theory in ethics. The course will also look at effective ethics programmes for organizations, ethics codes, professional ethics and other measures and activities in the organizational world.

Introduction to Applied Ethics

~~This course will look at the fundamental approaches and methods in applied ethics. It will introduce students to the case study method and emphasize decision-making and decision theory in ethics. The course will also look at effective ethics programmes for organizations, ethics codes, professional ethics and other measures and activities in the organizational world.

Introduction to Applied Ethics

Introduction to Applied Ethics

This course will look at the fundamental approaches and methods in applied ethics. It will introduce students to the case study method and emphasize decision-making and decision theory in ethics. The course will also look at effective ethics programmes for organizations, ethics codes, professional ethics and other measures and activities in the organizational world.

Introduction to Applied Ethics

~~This course will look at the fundamental approaches and methods in applied ethics. It will introduce students to the case study method and emphasize decision-making and decision theory in ethics. The course will also look at effective ethics programmes for organizations, ethics codes, professional ethics and other measures and activities in the organizational world.

Introduction to Applied Ethics

Introduction to Applied Ethics

This course will look at the fundamental approaches and methods in applied ethics. It will introduce students to the case study method and emphasize decision-making and decision theory in ethics. The course will also look at effective ethics programmes for organizations, ethics codes, professional ethics and other measures and activities in the organizational world.

Introduction to Bioethics

Bioethics is a field of reflection that focuses on the ethical issues raised by the advances in biomedical sciences and technologies, pushing even further the limits of human control over one's body, its future, and its environment. The course will explore this interdisciplinary field by identifying approaches, methods and main issues: procreation, the beginning of life, end of life, genetic technologies, organ and tissue transplantation, neuroscience, research and experimentation on humans, clinical decisions, and healthcare policies. The contribution of theology to these ethical questions and issues will be examined.

Introduction to Bioethics

Bioethics is a field of reflection that focuses on the ethical issues raised by the advances in biomedical sciences and technologies, pushing even further the limits of human control over one's body, its future, and its environment. The course will explore this interdisciplinary field by identifying approaches, methods and main issues: procreation, the beginning of life, end of life, genetic technologies, organ and tissue transplantation, neuroscience, research and experimentation on humans, clinical decisions, and healthcare policies. The contribution of theology to these ethical questions and issues will be examined.

Introduction to Bioethics

Bioethics is a field of reflection that focuses on the ethical issues raised by the advances in biomedical sciences and technologies, pushing even further the limits of human control over one's body, its future, and its environment. The course will explore this interdisciplinary field by identifying approaches, methods and main issues: procreation, the beginning of life, end of life, genetic technologies, organ and tissue transplantation, neuroscience, research and experimentation on humans, clinical decisions, and healthcare policies. The contribution of theology to these ethical questions and issues will be examined.

Introduction to Bioethics

Bioethics is a field of reflection that focuses on the ethical issues raised by the advances in biomedical sciences and technologies, pushing even further the limits of human control over one's body, its future, and its environment. The course will explore this interdisciplinary field by identifying approaches, methods and main issues: procreation, the beginning of life, end of life, genetic technologies, organ and tissue transplantation, neuroscience, research and experimentation on humans, clinical decisions, and healthcare policies. The contribution of theology to these ethical questions and issues will be examined.

Introduction to Christian Art

It is impossible to visit a museum, to travel abroad or to read a history book without coming across, at every turn, religious Christian art in its multiple forms (architecture, painting, sculpture), its specific references, its wealth of symbols, its major stages of development (Early Christian, Byzantine, Romanesque, Gothic, Renaissance, Baroque, Modern, Contemporary). These are the elements that will be identified and studied in this course.

Saturdays, 9a.m.-12p.m. & 1p.m.-4p.m.

February 29th, March 7th, 14th, 21st, 28th, April 4th

Introduction to Christian Art

It is impossible to visit a museum, to travel abroad or to read a history book without coming across, at every turn, religious Christian art in its multiple forms (architecture, painting, sculpture), its specific references, its wealth of symbols, its major stages of development (Early Christian, Byzantine, Romanesque, Gothic, Renaissance, Baroque, Modern, Contemporary). These are the elements that will be identified and studied in this course.

Saturdays, 9a.m.-12p.m. & 1p.m.-4p.m.

February 29th, March 7th, 14th, 21st, 28th, April 4th

Introduction to Christian Art

It is impossible to visit a museum, to travel abroad or to read a history book without coming across, at every turn, religious Christian art in its multiple forms (architecture, painting, sculpture), its specific references, its wealth of symbols, its major stages of development (Early Christian, Byzantine, Romanesque, Gothic, Renaissance, Baroque, Modern, Contemporary). These are the elements that will be identified and studied in this course.

Saturdays, 9a.m.-12p.m. & 1p.m.-4p.m.

February 29th, March 7th, 14th, 21st, 28th, April 4th

Introduction to Human Rights

This course is an Introduction to the Philosophy of human rights. We will address some fundamental questions related to human rights, such as their nature, source, foundation and justification. We will investigate the emergence of the concept of human rights in the history Philosophy. We will explore the philosophical foundations of human rights in various traditions with thinkers such as Locke, Kant, Hegel, Marx, Arendt and Rawls, among others. At the end of the course, students should have a wide perspective on human rights and the ability to understand and appeal to the theoretical background for their application in various situations.

Introduction to Pastoral Action

Introduction to Pastoral Action
(Videoconference from the IPD) 

 

The word "pastoral" is commonly used, but what exactly does it mean? And how does one go about it when one wants to take action?

This course marks out the whole field of pastoral action, from its roots in the Acts of the Apostles to its various forms in the Church and the world today. This allows a global portrait of pastoral competence to be drawn up so that each student can identify the types of action that correspond most closely to him or her. Then, the course proposes an introduction to 4 essential skills in all forms of pastoral action: observation of an environment, active listening, theological interpretation, team work. Starting from basic theoretical elements, these skills will be put into practice.

Introduction to Pastoral Action

Introduction to Pastoral Action
(Videoconference from the IPD) 

 

The word "pastoral" is commonly used, but what exactly does it mean? And how does one go about it when one wants to take action?

This course marks out the whole field of pastoral action, from its roots in the Acts of the Apostles to its various forms in the Church and the world today. This allows a global portrait of pastoral competence to be drawn up so that each student can identify the types of action that correspond most closely to him or her. Then, the course proposes an introduction to 4 essential skills in all forms of pastoral action: observation of an environment, active listening, theological interpretation, team work. Starting from basic theoretical elements, these skills will be put into practice.

Introduction to Pastoral Action

Introduction to Pastoral Action
(Videoconference from the IPD) 

 

The word "pastoral" is commonly used, but what exactly does it mean? And how does one go about it when one wants to take action?

This course marks out the whole field of pastoral action, from its roots in the Acts of the Apostles to its various forms in the Church and the world today. This allows a global portrait of pastoral competence to be drawn up so that each student can identify the types of action that correspond most closely to him or her. Then, the course proposes an introduction to 4 essential skills in all forms of pastoral action: observation of an environment, active listening, theological interpretation, team work. Starting from basic theoretical elements, these skills will be put into practice.

Introduction to Philosophy

This course will initiate students into the universe of philosophers and philosophy through the study of fundamental texts of the Western philosophical traditions. The emphasis will be on the study of the nature, scope and necessity of philosophical inquiry as an intellectual endeavour, distinct from other disciplines, namely theology and science. We will also discuss some philosophical problems, such as human knowledge and freedom.

Introduction to Philosophy

This course will initiate students into the universe of philosophers and philosophy through the study of fundamental texts of the Western philosophical traditions. The emphasis will be on the study of the nature, scope and necessity of philosophical inquiry as an intellectual endeavour, distinct from other disciplines, namely theology and science. We will also discuss some philosophical problems, such as human knowledge and freedom.

Introduction to Philosophy

Introduction to Philosophy

This course will initiate students into the universe of philosophers and philosophy through the study of fundamental texts of the Western philosophical traditions. The emphasis will be on the study of the nature, scope and necessity of philosophical inquiry as an intellectual endeavour, distinct from other disciplines, namely theology and science. We will also discuss some philosophical problems, such as human knowledge and freedom.

Introduction to Philosophy

Introduction to Philosophy

This course will initiate students into the universe of philosophers and philosophy through the study of fundamental texts of the Western philosophical traditions. The emphasis will be on the study of the nature, scope and necessity of philosophical inquiry as an intellectual endeavour, distinct from other disciplines, namely theology and science. We will also discuss some philosophical problems, such as human knowledge and freedom.

Introduction to Philosophy

This course will initiate students into the universe of philosophers and philosophy through the study of fundamental texts of the Western philosophical traditions. The emphasis will be on the study of the nature, scope and necessity of philosophical inquiry as an intellectual endeavour, distinct from other disciplines, namely theology and science. We will also discuss some philosophical problems, such as human knowledge and freedom.

Introduction to Philosophy

This course will initiate students into the universe of philosophers and philosophy through the study of fundamental texts of the Western philosophical traditions. The emphasis will be on the study of the nature, scope and necessity of philosophical inquiry as an intellectual endeavour, distinct from other disciplines, namely theology and science. We will also discuss some philosophical problems, such as human knowledge and freedom.

Introduction to Philosophy

Introduction to Philosophy

This course will initiate students into the universe of philosophers and philosophy through the study of fundamental texts of the Western philosophical traditions. The emphasis will be on the study of the nature, scope and necessity of philosophical inquiry as an intellectual endeavour, distinct from other disciplines, namely theology and science. We will also discuss some philosophical problems, such as human knowledge and freedom.

Introduction to Philosophy

This course will initiate students into the universe of philosophers and philosophy through the study of fundamental texts of the Western philosophical traditions. The emphasis will be on the study of the nature, scope and necessity of philosophical inquiry as an intellectual endeavour, distinct from other disciplines, namely theology and science. We will also discuss some philosophical problems, such as human knowledge and freedom.

Introduction to Philosophy

Introduction to Philosophy

This course will initiate students into the universe of philosophers and philosophy through the study of fundamental texts of the Western philosophical traditions. The emphasis will be on the study of the nature, scope and necessity of philosophical inquiry as an intellectual endeavour, distinct from other disciplines, namely theology and science. We will also discuss some philosophical problems, such as human knowledge and freedom.

Introduction to Text Reading

Introduction to Philosophical Text Readings

In this course, students will learn the basic techniques used for reading philosophical texts in order to understand and better appreciate major and complex philosophical texts.  These basic techniques will help students recognize the differences between serious philosophical works and other literary works. Texts selected for this course represent a diversity of philosophical genres from other times and cultures. Examples of selected texts may include Plato’s Apology, Augustine’s Confessions, and Pascal’s Pensées. The main teaching approach used in this course will be based on the assignment of reading tasks, group discussions and debates. At the end of the course, students will be able to apply the reading methodology that is appropriate to various philosophical authors and schools.

Introduction to Text Reading

Introduction to Philosophical Text Readings

In this course, students will learn the basic techniques used for reading philosophical texts in order to understand and better appreciate major and complex philosophical texts.  These basic techniques will help students recognize the differences between serious philosophical works and other literary works. Texts selected for this course represent a diversity of philosophical genres from other times and cultures. Examples of selected texts may include Plato’s Apology, Augustine’s Confessions, and Pascal’s Pensées. The main teaching approach used in this course will be based on the assignment of reading tasks, group discussions and debates. At the end of the course, students will be able to apply the reading methodology that is appropriate to various philosophical authors and schools.

Introduction to Text Reading

Introduction to Philosophical Text Readings

In this course, students will learn the basic techniques used for reading philosophical texts in order to understand and better appreciate major and complex philosophical texts.  These basic techniques will help students recognize the differences between serious philosophical works and other literary works. Texts selected for this course represent a diversity of philosophical genres from other times and cultures. Examples of selected texts may include Plato’s Apology, Augustine’s Confessions, and Pascal’s Pensées. The main teaching approach used in this course will be based on the assignment of reading tasks, group discussions and debates. At the end of the course, students will be able to apply the reading methodology that is appropriate to various philosophical authors and schools.

Introduction to Text Reading

Introduction to Philosophical Text Readings

In this course, students will learn the basic techniques used for reading philosophical texts in order to understand and better appreciate major and complex philosophical texts.  These basic techniques will help students recognize the differences between serious philosophical works and other literary works. Texts selected for this course represent a diversity of philosophical genres from other times and cultures. Examples of selected texts may include Plato’s Apology, Augustine’s Confessions, and Pascal’s Pensées. The main teaching approach used in this course will be based on the assignment of reading tasks, group discussions and debates. At the end of the course, students will be able to apply the reading methodology that is appropriate to various philosophical authors and schools.

Introduction to the philosophical options of the Frankfurt School: Emancipation

What has been called « the Frankfurt School » fascinates or repulses. The works of the people associated with it leave no one indifferent. Our seminar will be paying attention to the transformations and internal criticism concerning the concept of « emancipation ». We will relate the propositions from the Frankfurt school to those of Rancière, Balibar, Badiou. Why “emancipation”? Because of its relation to liberation, freedom and justice, three concepts at the heart of social and political issues still today. Why “emancipation”? Because of the rhetorical importance of emancipatory discourses of the last two centuries. Why “emancipation”? Because of the transformation of the conditions of work and of the place of “work-labor” in philosophical reflections.

The course will spread out from May to August.

Introduction to the philosophical options of the Frankfurt School: Emancipation

What has been called « the Frankfurt School » fascinates or repulses. The works of the people associated with it leave no one indifferent. Our seminar will be paying attention to the transformations and internal criticism concerning the concept of « emancipation ». We will relate the propositions from the Frankfurt school to those of Rancière, Balibar, Badiou. Why “emancipation”? Because of its relation to liberation, freedom and justice, three concepts at the heart of social and political issues still today. Why “emancipation”? Because of the rhetorical importance of emancipatory discourses of the last two centuries. Why “emancipation”? Because of the transformation of the conditions of work and of the place of “work-labor” in philosophical reflections.

The course will spread out from May to August.

Introduction to the philosophical options of the Frankfurt School: Emancipation

What has been called « the Frankfurt School » fascinates or repulses. The works of the people associated with it leave no one indifferent. Our seminar will be paying attention to the transformations and internal criticism concerning the concept of « emancipation ». We will relate the propositions from the Frankfurt school to those of Rancière, Balibar, Badiou. Why “emancipation”? Because of its relation to liberation, freedom and justice, three concepts at the heart of social and political issues still today. Why “emancipation”? Because of the rhetorical importance of emancipatory discourses of the last two centuries. Why “emancipation”? Because of the transformation of the conditions of work and of the place of “work-labor” in philosophical reflections.

The course will spread out from May to August.

Introduction to the philosophical options of the Frankfurt School: Emancipation

What has been called « the Frankfurt School » fascinates or repulses. The works of the people associated with it leave no one indifferent. Our seminar will be paying attention to the transformations and internal criticism concerning the concept of « emancipation ». We will relate the propositions from the Frankfurt school to those of Rancière, Balibar, Badiou. Why “emancipation”? Because of its relation to liberation, freedom and justice, three concepts at the heart of social and political issues still today. Why “emancipation”? Because of the rhetorical importance of emancipatory discourses of the last two centuries. Why “emancipation”? Because of the transformation of the conditions of work and of the place of “work-labor” in philosophical reflections.

The course will spread out from May to August.

Introduction to the philosophical options of the Frankfurt School: Emancipation

What has been called « the Frankfurt School » fascinates or repulses. The works of the people associated with it leave no one indifferent. Our seminar will be paying attention to the transformations and internal criticism concerning the concept of « emancipation ». We will relate the propositions from the Frankfurt school to those of Rancière, Balibar, Badiou. Why “emancipation”? Because of its relation to liberation, freedom and justice, three concepts at the heart of social and political issues still today. Why “emancipation”? Because of the rhetorical importance of emancipatory discourses of the last two centuries. Why “emancipation”? Because of the transformation of the conditions of work and of the place of “work-labor” in philosophical reflections.

The course will spread out from May to August.

Introduction to the philosophical options of the Frankfurt School: Emancipation

What has been called « the Frankfurt School » fascinates or repulses. The works of the people associated with it leave no one indifferent. Our seminar will be paying attention to the transformations and internal criticism concerning the concept of « emancipation ». We will relate the propositions from the Frankfurt school to those of Rancière, Balibar, Badiou. Why “emancipation”? Because of its relation to liberation, freedom and justice, three concepts at the heart of social and political issues still today. Why “emancipation”? Because of the rhetorical importance of emancipatory discourses of the last two centuries. Why “emancipation”? Because of the transformation of the conditions of work and of the place of “work-labor” in philosophical reflections.

The course will spread out from May to August.

Introduction to the philosophical options of the Frankfurt School: Emancipation

What has been called « the Frankfurt School » fascinates or repulses. The works of the people associated with it leave no one indifferent. Our seminar will be paying attention to the transformations and internal criticism concerning the concept of « emancipation ». We will relate the propositions from the Frankfurt school to those of Rancière, Balibar, Badiou. Why “emancipation”? Because of its relation to liberation, freedom and justice, three concepts at the heart of social and political issues still today. Why “emancipation”? Because of the rhetorical importance of emancipatory discourses of the last two centuries. Why “emancipation”? Because of the transformation of the conditions of work and of the place of “work-labor” in philosophical reflections.

The course will spread out from May to August.

Introduction to the philosophical options of the Frankfurt School: Emancipation

What has been called « the Frankfurt School » fascinates or repulses. The works of the people associated with it leave no one indifferent. Our seminar will be paying attention to the transformations and internal criticism concerning the concept of « emancipation ». We will relate the propositions from the Frankfurt school to those of Rancière, Balibar, Badiou. Why “emancipation”? Because of its relation to liberation, freedom and justice, three concepts at the heart of social and political issues still today. Why “emancipation”? Because of the rhetorical importance of emancipatory discourses of the last two centuries. Why “emancipation”? Because of the transformation of the conditions of work and of the place of “work-labor” in philosophical reflections.

The course will spread out from May to August.

Issues in Philosophy of Memory

This graduate seminar aims at exploring issues in philosophy of memory. Philosophy of memory is a field of research associated with and intimately linked to philosophy of mind and more specifically, the personal identity debate. The seminar will combine two key elements: a historical and a topical one. We will look into the classical theories of memory of Aristotle, St. Augustine, Thomas Aquinas, John Locke, Thomas Reid, David Hume, as well some of the contemporary theories of Bertrand Russell, Henri Bergson, and Paul Ricoeur. The topics that will be explored in the seminar will range from memory and meaning construction, memory and self, memory and time, to memory and morality, and memory and society.

Issues in Philosophy of Memory

This graduate seminar aims at exploring issues in philosophy of memory. Philosophy of memory is a field of research associated with and intimately linked to philosophy of mind and more specifically, the personal identity debate. The seminar will combine two key elements: a historical and a topical one. We will look into the classical theories of memory of Aristotle, St. Augustine, Thomas Aquinas, John Locke, Thomas Reid, David Hume, as well some of the contemporary theories of Bertrand Russell, Henri Bergson, and Paul Ricoeur. The topics that will be explored in the seminar will range from memory and meaning construction, memory and self, memory and time, to memory and morality, and memory and society.

Issues in Philosophy of Memory

This graduate seminar aims at exploring issues in philosophy of memory. Philosophy of memory is a field of research associated with and intimately linked to philosophy of mind and more specifically, the personal identity debate. The seminar will combine two key elements: a historical and a topical one. We will look into the classical theories of memory of Aristotle, St. Augustine, Thomas Aquinas, John Locke, Thomas Reid, David Hume, as well some of the contemporary theories of Bertrand Russell, Henri Bergson, and Paul Ricoeur. The topics that will be explored in the seminar will range from memory and meaning construction, memory and self, memory and time, to memory and morality, and memory and society.

Issues in Philosophy of Memory

This graduate seminar aims at exploring issues in philosophy of memory. Philosophy of memory is a field of research associated with and intimately linked to philosophy of mind and more specifically, the personal identity debate. The seminar will combine two key elements: a historical and a topical one. We will look into the classical theories of memory of Aristotle, St. Augustine, Thomas Aquinas, John Locke, Thomas Reid, David Hume, as well some of the contemporary theories of Bertrand Russell, Henri Bergson, and Paul Ricoeur. The topics that will be explored in the seminar will range from memory and meaning construction, memory and self, memory and time, to memory and morality, and memory and society.

Issues in Philosophy of Memory

This graduate seminar aims at exploring issues in philosophy of memory. Philosophy of memory is a field of research associated with and intimately linked to philosophy of mind and more specifically, the personal identity debate. The seminar will combine two key elements: a historical and a topical one. We will look into the classical theories of memory of Aristotle, St. Augustine, Thomas Aquinas, John Locke, Thomas Reid, David Hume, as well some of the contemporary theories of Bertrand Russell, Henri Bergson, and Paul Ricoeur. The topics that will be explored in the seminar will range from memory and meaning construction, memory and self, memory and time, to memory and morality, and memory and society.

Issues in Philosophy of Memory

This graduate seminar aims at exploring issues in philosophy of memory. Philosophy of memory is a field of research associated with and intimately linked to philosophy of mind and more specifically, the personal identity debate. The seminar will combine two key elements: a historical and a topical one. We will look into the classical theories of memory of Aristotle, St. Augustine, Thomas Aquinas, John Locke, Thomas Reid, David Hume, as well some of the contemporary theories of Bertrand Russell, Henri Bergson, and Paul Ricoeur. The topics that will be explored in the seminar will range from memory and meaning construction, memory and self, memory and time, to memory and morality, and memory and society.

Issues in Philosophy of Memory

This graduate seminar aims at exploring issues in philosophy of memory. Philosophy of memory is a field of research associated with and intimately linked to philosophy of mind and more specifically, the personal identity debate. The seminar will combine two key elements: a historical and a topical one. We will look into the classical theories of memory of Aristotle, St. Augustine, Thomas Aquinas, John Locke, Thomas Reid, David Hume, as well some of the contemporary theories of Bertrand Russell, Henri Bergson, and Paul Ricoeur. The topics that will be explored in the seminar will range from memory and meaning construction, memory and self, memory and time, to memory and morality, and memory and society.

Issues in Philosophy of Memory

This graduate seminar aims at exploring issues in philosophy of memory. Philosophy of memory is a field of research associated with and intimately linked to philosophy of mind and more specifically, the personal identity debate. The seminar will combine two key elements: a historical and a topical one. We will look into the classical theories of memory of Aristotle, St. Augustine, Thomas Aquinas, John Locke, Thomas Reid, David Hume, as well some of the contemporary theories of Bertrand Russell, Henri Bergson, and Paul Ricoeur. The topics that will be explored in the seminar will range from memory and meaning construction, memory and self, memory and time, to memory and morality, and memory and society.

Justice chez Thomas d’Aquin / Justice in Thomas Aquinas

Penser la justice ou Thomas d’Aquin après Rawls, Nussbaum, Fraser, Forst et d’autres
Thinking justice or Thomas Aquinas after Rawls, Nussbaum, Fraser, Forst and others

Ce séminaire sur Thomas d’Aquin entend proposer une relecture de traitements de questions sur la « justice » dans le corpus thomasien. Il entend le faire à la lumière de propositions contemporaines peu suspectes d’avoir frayé avec ces traitements.

This seminar on Thomas Aquinas offers a rereading of the treatment of questions on "justice" in the Thomasian corpus. However, it aims to do so in the light of contemporary proposals, at first sight quite remote from these treatments.

Justice chez Thomas d’Aquin / Justice in Thomas Aquinas

Penser la justice ou Thomas d’Aquin après Rawls, Nussbaum, Fraser, Forst et d’autres
Thinking justice or Thomas Aquinas after Rawls, Nussbaum, Fraser, Forst and others

Ce séminaire sur Thomas d’Aquin entend proposer une relecture de traitements de questions sur la « justice » dans le corpus thomasien. Il entend le faire à la lumière de propositions contemporaines peu suspectes d’avoir frayé avec ces traitements.

This seminar on Thomas Aquinas offers a rereading of the treatment of questions on "justice" in the Thomasian corpus. However, it aims to do so in the light of contemporary proposals, at first sight quite remote from these treatments.

Justice chez Thomas d’Aquin / Justice in Thomas Aquinas

Penser la justice ou Thomas d’Aquin après Rawls, Nussbaum, Fraser, Forst et d’autres
Thinking justice or Thomas Aquinas after Rawls, Nussbaum, Fraser, Forst and others

Ce séminaire sur Thomas d’Aquin entend proposer une relecture de traitements de questions sur la « justice » dans le corpus thomasien. Il entend le faire à la lumière de propositions contemporaines peu suspectes d’avoir frayé avec ces traitements.

This seminar on Thomas Aquinas offers a rereading of the treatment of questions on "justice" in the Thomasian corpus. However, it aims to do so in the light of contemporary proposals, at first sight quite remote from these treatments.

Justice in Thomas Aquinas II

This is part II of our reflection on Thomas Aquinas’ treatment of the question of Justice.  We will explore this theme in light of contemporary philosophical schools.  The course aims to broaden our philosophical canvas on the concept of Justice.

Kant

Kant’s intention was to limit the claims of metaphysics in order to make room for faith. He saw his philosophical efforts as a revolution akin to that of Copernicus. The course will consider Kant’s claim that his critique was a “call to reason to undertake anew the most difficult of all its tasks, namely, that of self-knowledge.” A close reading of parts of Kant’s Critique of Pure Reason and of other major texts will be used as a basis for this consideration.

Kant

Kant's intention was to limit the claims of metaphysics in order to make room for faith. He saw his philosophical efforts as a revolution akin to that of Copernicus. The course will consider Kant's claim that his critique was a "call to reason to undertake anew the most difficult of all its tasks, namely, that of self-knowledge." A close reading of parts of Kant's Critique of Pure Reason and of other major texts will be used as a basis for this consideration.

Kant

Kant's intention was to limit the claims of metaphysics in order to make room for faith. He saw his philosophical efforts as a revolution akin to that of Copernicus. The course will consider Kant's claim that his critique was a "call to reason to undertake anew the most difficult of all its tasks, namely, that of self-knowledge." A close reading of parts of Kant's Critique of Pure Reason and of other major texts will be used as a basis for this consideration.

Kant

Kant's intention was to limit the claims of metaphysics in order to make room for faith. He saw his philosophical efforts as a revolution akin to that of Copernicus. The course will consider Kant's claim that his critique was a "call to reason to undertake anew the most difficult of all its tasks, namely, that of self-knowledge." A close reading of parts of Kant's Critique of Pure Reason and of other major texts will be used as a basis for this consideration.

Kant

Kant's intention was to limit the claims of metaphysics in order to make room for faith. He saw his philosophical efforts as a revolution akin to that of Copernicus. The course will consider Kant's claim that his critique was a "call to reason to undertake anew the most difficult of all its tasks, namely, that of self-knowledge." A close reading of parts of Kant's Critique of Pure Reason and of other major texts will be used as a basis for this consideration.

Kant’s Refutation of Idealism

This course is an in-depth study of the “Refutation of Idealism” in Immanuel Kant’s Critique of Pure Reason. Kant was determined not to be characterized as a subjective or productive idealist. This meant 11 that he had to uphold a robust and direct realism while maintaining that whatever was given to us in experience could only be understood through the peculiar a priori structure of the human mind. Reconciling Kant’s empirical realism with his transcendental idealism has been a longstanding effort of several centuries of commentary on his philosophy. The broader philosophical arguments of the “Refutation of Idealism” lead Kant to conclude that outer appearances must exist indubitably. Seminarians will be guided to an appreciation of the fundamental problems of critical idealism in the Critique of Pure Reason through a broad consideration of the Transcendental Aesthetic, Analytic, and Dialectic. The seminar will then focus on the unique status of the “Refutation of Idealism” in the Kantian corpus. The primary teaching approach for this course is lecture based. Students will be expected to do class presentations and submit a final paper at the end of the semester. At the end of the course, students should be able to identify a cluster of problems with respect to the status of outer objects, to evaluate Kant’s arguments for the indubitability of outer appearances, and to appreciate why the critical philosophy must avoid transcendental realism. Students are expected to demonstrate their abilities to engage with Kant’s critical idealism by means of seminar presentations, dialogue, and the submission of written work.

Kant’s Refutation of Idealism

This course is an in-depth study of the “Refutation of Idealism” in Immanuel Kant’s Critique of Pure Reason. Kant was determined not to be characterized as a subjective or productive idealist. This meant 11 that he had to uphold a robust and direct realism while maintaining that whatever was given to us in experience could only be understood through the peculiar a priori structure of the human mind. Reconciling Kant’s empirical realism with his transcendental idealism has been a longstanding effort of several centuries of commentary on his philosophy. The broader philosophical arguments of the “Refutation of Idealism” lead Kant to conclude that outer appearances must exist indubitably. Seminarians will be guided to an appreciation of the fundamental problems of critical idealism in the Critique of Pure Reason through a broad consideration of the Transcendental Aesthetic, Analytic, and Dialectic. The seminar will then focus on the unique status of the “Refutation of Idealism” in the Kantian corpus. The primary teaching approach for this course is lecture based. Students will be expected to do class presentations and submit a final paper at the end of the semester. At the end of the course, students should be able to identify a cluster of problems with respect to the status of outer objects, to evaluate Kant’s arguments for the indubitability of outer appearances, and to appreciate why the critical philosophy must avoid transcendental realism. Students are expected to demonstrate their abilities to engage with Kant’s critical idealism by means of seminar presentations, dialogue, and the submission of written work.

Kant’s Refutation of Idealism

This course is an in-depth study of the “Refutation of Idealism” in Immanuel Kant’s Critique of Pure Reason. Kant was determined not to be characterized as a subjective or productive idealist. This meant 11 that he had to uphold a robust and direct realism while maintaining that whatever was given to us in experience could only be understood through the peculiar a priori structure of the human mind. Reconciling Kant’s empirical realism with his transcendental idealism has been a longstanding effort of several centuries of commentary on his philosophy. The broader philosophical arguments of the “Refutation of Idealism” lead Kant to conclude that outer appearances must exist indubitably. Seminarians will be guided to an appreciation of the fundamental problems of critical idealism in the Critique of Pure Reason through a broad consideration of the Transcendental Aesthetic, Analytic, and Dialectic. The seminar will then focus on the unique status of the “Refutation of Idealism” in the Kantian corpus. The primary teaching approach for this course is lecture based. Students will be expected to do class presentations and submit a final paper at the end of the semester. At the end of the course, students should be able to identify a cluster of problems with respect to the status of outer objects, to evaluate Kant’s arguments for the indubitability of outer appearances, and to appreciate why the critical philosophy must avoid transcendental realism. Students are expected to demonstrate their abilities to engage with Kant’s critical idealism by means of seminar presentations, dialogue, and the submission of written work.

Kant’s Refutation of Idealism

This course is an in-depth study of the “Refutation of Idealism” in Immanuel Kant’s Critique of Pure Reason. Kant was determined not to be characterized as a subjective or productive idealist. This meant 11 that he had to uphold a robust and direct realism while maintaining that whatever was given to us in experience could only be understood through the peculiar a priori structure of the human mind. Reconciling Kant’s empirical realism with his transcendental idealism has been a longstanding effort of several centuries of commentary on his philosophy. The broader philosophical arguments of the “Refutation of Idealism” lead Kant to conclude that outer appearances must exist indubitably. Seminarians will be guided to an appreciation of the fundamental problems of critical idealism in the Critique of Pure Reason through a broad consideration of the Transcendental Aesthetic, Analytic, and Dialectic. The seminar will then focus on the unique status of the “Refutation of Idealism” in the Kantian corpus. The primary teaching approach for this course is lecture based. Students will be expected to do class presentations and submit a final paper at the end of the semester. At the end of the course, students should be able to identify a cluster of problems with respect to the status of outer objects, to evaluate Kant’s arguments for the indubitability of outer appearances, and to appreciate why the critical philosophy must avoid transcendental realism. Students are expected to demonstrate their abilities to engage with Kant’s critical idealism by means of seminar presentations, dialogue, and the submission of written work.

Kant’s Refutation of Idealism

This course is an in-depth study of the “Refutation of Idealism” in Immanuel Kant’s Critique of Pure Reason. Kant was determined not to be characterized as a subjective or productive idealist. This meant 11 that he had to uphold a robust and direct realism while maintaining that whatever was given to us in experience could only be understood through the peculiar a priori structure of the human mind. Reconciling Kant’s empirical realism with his transcendental idealism has been a longstanding effort of several centuries of commentary on his philosophy. The broader philosophical arguments of the “Refutation of Idealism” lead Kant to conclude that outer appearances must exist indubitably. Seminarians will be guided to an appreciation of the fundamental problems of critical idealism in the Critique of Pure Reason through a broad consideration of the Transcendental Aesthetic, Analytic, and Dialectic. The seminar will then focus on the unique status of the “Refutation of Idealism” in the Kantian corpus. The primary teaching approach for this course is lecture based. Students will be expected to do class presentations and submit a final paper at the end of the semester. At the end of the course, students should be able to identify a cluster of problems with respect to the status of outer objects, to evaluate Kant’s arguments for the indubitability of outer appearances, and to appreciate why the critical philosophy must avoid transcendental realism. Students are expected to demonstrate their abilities to engage with Kant’s critical idealism by means of seminar presentations, dialogue, and the submission of written work.

Kant’s Refutation of Idealism

This course is an in-depth study of the “Refutation of Idealism” in Immanuel Kant’s Critique of Pure Reason. Kant was determined not to be characterized as a subjective or productive idealist. This meant 11 that he had to uphold a robust and direct realism while maintaining that whatever was given to us in experience could only be understood through the peculiar a priori structure of the human mind. Reconciling Kant’s empirical realism with his transcendental idealism has been a longstanding effort of several centuries of commentary on his philosophy. The broader philosophical arguments of the “Refutation of Idealism” lead Kant to conclude that outer appearances must exist indubitably. Seminarians will be guided to an appreciation of the fundamental problems of critical idealism in the Critique of Pure Reason through a broad consideration of the Transcendental Aesthetic, Analytic, and Dialectic. The seminar will then focus on the unique status of the “Refutation of Idealism” in the Kantian corpus. The primary teaching approach for this course is lecture based. Students will be expected to do class presentations and submit a final paper at the end of the semester. At the end of the course, students should be able to identify a cluster of problems with respect to the status of outer objects, to evaluate Kant’s arguments for the indubitability of outer appearances, and to appreciate why the critical philosophy must avoid transcendental realism. Students are expected to demonstrate their abilities to engage with Kant’s critical idealism by means of seminar presentations, dialogue, and the submission of written work.

Kant’s Refutation of Idealism

This course is an in-depth study of the “Refutation of Idealism” in Immanuel Kant’s Critique of Pure Reason. Kant was determined not to be characterized as a subjective or productive idealist. This meant 11 that he had to uphold a robust and direct realism while maintaining that whatever was given to us in experience could only be understood through the peculiar a priori structure of the human mind. Reconciling Kant’s empirical realism with his transcendental idealism has been a longstanding effort of several centuries of commentary on his philosophy. The broader philosophical arguments of the “Refutation of Idealism” lead Kant to conclude that outer appearances must exist indubitably. Seminarians will be guided to an appreciation of the fundamental problems of critical idealism in the Critique of Pure Reason through a broad consideration of the Transcendental Aesthetic, Analytic, and Dialectic. The seminar will then focus on the unique status of the “Refutation of Idealism” in the Kantian corpus. The primary teaching approach for this course is lecture based. Students will be expected to do class presentations and submit a final paper at the end of the semester. At the end of the course, students should be able to identify a cluster of problems with respect to the status of outer objects, to evaluate Kant’s arguments for the indubitability of outer appearances, and to appreciate why the critical philosophy must avoid transcendental realism. Students are expected to demonstrate their abilities to engage with Kant’s critical idealism by means of seminar presentations, dialogue, and the submission of written work.

Knowledge and Freedom of Jesus

Knowledge and Freedom of Jesus 

In a time where believers and unbelievers wonder about who was Jesus, in connection with their own questions about the meaning of their life, this course will ponder viewpoints about the humanity of Christ, taken from exegetes and theologians.  We shall discuss issues such as the following:

-How should we interpret the “he emptied himself” of Philippians 2:6-11?

-To what extent was Jesus similar to us?

-Did he have faith, or did he possess a perfect knowledge that ruled out faith?

-How much of the Father’s design did he know? Did his understanding of his mission evolve, in light of events that shaped his reflections?

-Was his freedom in all respects like ours?

-Was he really tempted?

-What happened at Gethsemane and on the cross?

-Why could Jesus accomplish something that neither Buddha nor Gandhi nor anyone else could achieve?

The classes will be held on October 13, 15, 20, 22, 27 and 29.

 

 

Knowledge and Freedom of Jesus

Knowledge and Freedom of Jesus 

In a time where believers and unbelievers wonder about who was Jesus, in connection with their own questions about the meaning of their life, this course will ponder viewpoints about the humanity of Christ, taken from exegetes and theologians.  We shall discuss issues such as the following:

-How should we interpret the “he emptied himself” of Philippians 2:6-11?

-To what extent was Jesus similar to us?

-Did he have faith, or did he possess a perfect knowledge that ruled out faith?

-How much of the Father’s design did he know? Did his understanding of his mission evolve, in light of events that shaped his reflections?

-Was his freedom in all respects like ours?

-Was he really tempted?

-What happened at Gethsemane and on the cross?

-Why could Jesus accomplish something that neither Buddha nor Gandhi nor anyone else could achieve?

The classes will be held on October 13, 15, 20, 22, 27 and 29.

 

 

Knowledge and Freedom of Jesus

Knowledge and Freedom of Jesus 

In a time where believers and unbelievers wonder about who was Jesus, in connection with their own questions about the meaning of their life, this course will ponder viewpoints about the humanity of Christ, taken from exegetes and theologians.  We shall discuss issues such as the following:

-How should we interpret the “he emptied himself” of Philippians 2:6-11?

-To what extent was Jesus similar to us?

-Did he have faith, or did he possess a perfect knowledge that ruled out faith?

-How much of the Father’s design did he know? Did his understanding of his mission evolve, in light of events that shaped his reflections?

-Was his freedom in all respects like ours?

-Was he really tempted?

-What happened at Gethsemane and on the cross?

-Why could Jesus accomplish something that neither Buddha nor Gandhi nor anyone else could achieve?

The classes will be held on October 13, 15, 20, 22, 27 and 29.

 

 

Knowledge and Freedom of Jesus

Knowledge and Freedom of Jesus 

In a time where believers and unbelievers wonder about who was Jesus, in connection with their own questions about the meaning of their life, this course will ponder viewpoints about the humanity of Christ, taken from exegetes and theologians.  We shall discuss issues such as the following:

-How should we interpret the “he emptied himself” of Philippians 2:6-11?

-To what extent was Jesus similar to us?

-Did he have faith, or did he possess a perfect knowledge that ruled out faith?

-How much of the Father’s design did he know? Did his understanding of his mission evolve, in light of events that shaped his reflections?

-Was his freedom in all respects like ours?

-Was he really tempted?

-What happened at Gethsemane and on the cross?

-Why could Jesus accomplish something that neither Buddha nor Gandhi nor anyone else could achieve?

The classes will be held on October 13, 15, 20, 22, 27 and 29.

 

 

Latin

Required to obtain the canonical degrees (Latin for the Bachelor’s, Greek for the Licentiate, and Hebrew for the Doctorate), knowledge of the classical languages provides students with an irreplaceable access to first-hand sources. Classical Languages are highly recommended to all students, even to those who are aiming for a civil degree, especially those who plan on working in the areas of exegesis, patristics and history.

Latin

Required to obtain the canonical degrees (Latin for the Bachelor’s, Greek for the Licentiate, and Hebrew for the Doctorate), knowledge of the classical languages provides students with an irreplaceable access to first-hand sources. Classical Languages are highly recommended to all students, even to those who are aiming for a civil degree, especially those who plan on working in the areas of exegesis, patristics and history.

Latin

Required to obtain the canonical degrees (Latin for the Bachelor’s, Greek for the Licentiate, and Hebrew for the Doctorate), knowledge of the classical languages provides students with an irreplaceable access to first-hand sources. Classical Languages are highly recommended to all students, even to those who are aiming for a civil degree, especially those who plan on working in the areas of exegesis, patristics and history.

Latin

Required to obtain the canonical degrees (Latin for the Bachelor’s, Greek for the Licentiate, and Hebrew for the Doctorate), knowledge of the classical languages provides students with an irreplaceable access to first-hand sources. Classical Languages are highly recommended to all students, even to those who are aiming for a civil degree, especially those who plan on working in the areas of exegesis, patristics and history.

Le problème de l’individuation dans la philosophie médiévale tardive

Un individu est-il métaphysiquement primitif? Est-ce qu’il nécessite aucune explication? Socrate est-il un individu «par lui seul»? La réponse à ces questions détermine si l'on prend la voie classique (via antiqua) ou la voie moderne (via moderna). Il sert également en métaphysique de clé de voûte aux querelles des universaux et au problème de la connaissance. À la suite de leurs homologues grecs et arabes, les latins ont débattu vigoureusement pendant des siècles la question de l'unité individuelle. Ce cours se concentrera sur l'interprétation et l'évaluation des arguments de Thomas Aquinas, de Duns Scot, de Guillaume d'Occam et de Francisco Suárez. En conséquence, il considérera le problème de l'individuation comme une conversation animée et continue entre auteurs de différentes époques sur des questions qui continuent à nos jours.

Le problème de l’individuation dans la philosophie médiévale tardive

Un individu est-il métaphysiquement primitif? Est-ce qu’il nécessite aucune explication? Socrate est-il un individu «par lui seul»? La réponse à ces questions détermine si l'on prend la voie classique (via antiqua) ou la voie moderne (via moderna). Il sert également en métaphysique de clé de voûte aux querelles des universaux et au problème de la connaissance. À la suite de leurs homologues grecs et arabes, les latins ont débattu vigoureusement pendant des siècles la question de l'unité individuelle. Ce cours se concentrera sur l'interprétation et l'évaluation des arguments de Thomas Aquinas, de Duns Scot, de Guillaume d'Occam et de Francisco Suárez. En conséquence, il considérera le problème de l'individuation comme une conversation animée et continue entre auteurs de différentes époques sur des questions qui continuent à nos jours.

Le problème de l’individuation dans la philosophie médiévale tardive

Un individu est-il métaphysiquement primitif? Est-ce qu’il nécessite aucune explication? Socrate est-il un individu «par lui seul»? La réponse à ces questions détermine si l'on prend la voie classique (via antiqua) ou la voie moderne (via moderna). Il sert également en métaphysique de clé de voûte aux querelles des universaux et au problème de la connaissance. À la suite de leurs homologues grecs et arabes, les latins ont débattu vigoureusement pendant des siècles la question de l'unité individuelle. Ce cours se concentrera sur l'interprétation et l'évaluation des arguments de Thomas Aquinas, de Duns Scot, de Guillaume d'Occam et de Francisco Suárez. En conséquence, il considérera le problème de l'individuation comme une conversation animée et continue entre auteurs de différentes époques sur des questions qui continuent à nos jours.

Le problème de l’individuation dans la philosophie médiévale tardive

Un individu est-il métaphysiquement primitif? Est-ce qu’il nécessite aucune explication? Socrate est-il un individu «par lui seul»? La réponse à ces questions détermine si l'on prend la voie classique (via antiqua) ou la voie moderne (via moderna). Il sert également en métaphysique de clé de voûte aux querelles des universaux et au problème de la connaissance. À la suite de leurs homologues grecs et arabes, les latins ont débattu vigoureusement pendant des siècles la question de l'unité individuelle. Ce cours se concentrera sur l'interprétation et l'évaluation des arguments de Thomas Aquinas, de Duns Scot, de Guillaume d'Occam et de Francisco Suárez. En conséquence, il considérera le problème de l'individuation comme une conversation animée et continue entre auteurs de différentes époques sur des questions qui continuent à nos jours.

Le problème de l’individuation dans la philosophie médiévale tardive

Un individu est-il métaphysiquement primitif? Est-ce qu’il nécessite aucune explication? Socrate est-il un individu «par lui seul»? La réponse à ces questions détermine si l'on prend la voie classique (via antiqua) ou la voie moderne (via moderna). Il sert également en métaphysique de clé de voûte aux querelles des universaux et au problème de la connaissance. À la suite de leurs homologues grecs et arabes, les latins ont débattu vigoureusement pendant des siècles la question de l'unité individuelle. Ce cours se concentrera sur l'interprétation et l'évaluation des arguments de Thomas Aquinas, de Duns Scot, de Guillaume d'Occam et de Francisco Suárez. En conséquence, il considérera le problème de l'individuation comme une conversation animée et continue entre auteurs de différentes époques sur des questions qui continuent à nos jours.

Le problème de l’individuation dans la philosophie médiévale tardive

Un individu est-il métaphysiquement primitif? Est-ce qu’il nécessite aucune explication? Socrate est-il un individu «par lui seul»? La réponse à ces questions détermine si l'on prend la voie classique (via antiqua) ou la voie moderne (via moderna). Il sert également en métaphysique de clé de voûte aux querelles des universaux et au problème de la connaissance. À la suite de leurs homologues grecs et arabes, les latins ont débattu vigoureusement pendant des siècles la question de l'unité individuelle. Ce cours se concentrera sur l'interprétation et l'évaluation des arguments de Thomas Aquinas, de Duns Scot, de Guillaume d'Occam et de Francisco Suárez. En conséquence, il considérera le problème de l'individuation comme une conversation animée et continue entre auteurs de différentes époques sur des questions qui continuent à nos jours.

Le problème de l’individuation dans la philosophie médiévale tardive

Un individu est-il métaphysiquement primitif? Est-ce qu’il nécessite aucune explication? Socrate est-il un individu «par lui seul»? La réponse à ces questions détermine si l'on prend la voie classique (via antiqua) ou la voie moderne (via moderna). Il sert également en métaphysique de clé de voûte aux querelles des universaux et au problème de la connaissance. À la suite de leurs homologues grecs et arabes, les latins ont débattu vigoureusement pendant des siècles la question de l'unité individuelle. Ce cours se concentrera sur l'interprétation et l'évaluation des arguments de Thomas Aquinas, de Duns Scot, de Guillaume d'Occam et de Francisco Suárez. En conséquence, il considérera le problème de l'individuation comme une conversation animée et continue entre auteurs de différentes époques sur des questions qui continuent à nos jours.

Stoicism in Early Modern French Philosophy

Descartes was not a Stoic, but he certainly found Stoicism useful in formulating his own philosophy. In this course, we will look at the use Descartes found for Seneca. The lectures will mainly be in English but the official texts for Descartes will be in French.

Le stoïcisme en philosophie moderne / Stoicism in Early Modern French Philosophy

Le stoïcisme en philosophie moderne (XVIIe siècle): Descartes
Stoicism in Early Modern French Philosophy: Descartes

Descartes n'était pas stoïcien, mais il a certainement trouvé le stoïcisme utile dans la formulation de sa propre philosophie. Dans ce cours, nous verrons l'utilisation que fait Descartes de Sénèque. Les classes seront donnés principalement en anglais, mais nous utiliserons les textes de Descartes en français.

Descartes was not a Stoic, but he certainly found Stoicism useful in formulating his own philosophy. In this course, we will look at the use Descartes found for Seneca. The lectures will mainly be in English but the official texts for Descartes will be in French.

Le stoïcisme en philosophie moderne / Stoicism in Early Modern French Philosophy

Le stoïcisme en philosophie moderne (XVIIe siècle): Descartes
Stoicism in Early Modern French Philosophy: Descartes

Descartes n'était pas stoïcien, mais il a certainement trouvé le stoïcisme utile dans la formulation de sa propre philosophie. Dans ce cours, nous verrons l'utilisation que fait Descartes de Sénèque. Les classes seront donnés principalement en anglais, mais nous utiliserons les textes de Descartes en français.

Descartes was not a Stoic, but he certainly found Stoicism useful in formulating his own philosophy. In this course, we will look at the use Descartes found for Seneca. The lectures will mainly be in English but the official texts for Descartes will be in French.

Le stoïcisme en philosophie moderne / Stoicism in Early Modern French Philosophy

Le stoïcisme en philosophie moderne (XVIIe siècle): Descartes
Stoicism in Early Modern French Philosophy: Descartes

Descartes n'était pas stoïcien, mais il a certainement trouvé le stoïcisme utile dans la formulation de sa propre philosophie. Dans ce cours, nous verrons l'utilisation que fait Descartes de Sénèque. Les classes seront donnés principalement en anglais, mais nous utiliserons les textes de Descartes en français.

Descartes was not a Stoic, but he certainly found Stoicism useful in formulating his own philosophy. In this course, we will look at the use Descartes found for Seneca. The lectures will mainly be in English but the official texts for Descartes will be in French.

Le stoïcisme en philosophie moderne / Stoicism in Early Modern French Philosophy

Le stoïcisme en philosophie moderne (XVIIe siècle): Descartes
Stoicism in Early Modern French Philosophy: Descartes

Descartes n'était pas stoïcien, mais il a certainement trouvé le stoïcisme utile dans la formulation de sa propre philosophie. Dans ce cours, nous verrons l'utilisation que fait Descartes de Sénèque. Les classes seront donnés principalement en anglais, mais nous utiliserons les textes de Descartes en français.

Descartes was not a Stoic, but he certainly found Stoicism useful in formulating his own philosophy. In this course, we will look at the use Descartes found for Seneca. The lectures will mainly be in English but the official texts for Descartes will be in French.

Logic I

This course is an introduction to symbolic logic. By means of truth tables, consistency trees and derivations, we will study the two fundamental tools for logical calculus: propositional calculus and first order predicate calculus.

Logic I

This course is an introduction to symbolic logic. By means of truth tables, consistency trees and derivations, we will study the two fundamental tools for logical calculus: propositional calculus and first order predicate calculus.

Logic I

This course is an introduction to symbolic logic. By means of truth tables, consistency trees and derivations, we will study the two fundamental tools for logical calculus: propositional calculus and first order predicate calculus.

Logic II

Logic II

This course deals with various non-classical logical systems. It requires familiarity with standard propositional and predicate logic (first-order logical calculus), including derivations and tableaux. The course is divided into three parts: modal logic (we will cover basic as well as normal modal logics); multi-value logic (such as Jan Łukasiewicz’s three-value logic), and intuitionist logic (e.g., possible-worlds semantics). We will cover proofs, theorems as well as paradoxes, from each section. Graham Priest’s Introduction to Non-Classical Logic: From If to Is will be the main text used in the course.

 

Logic II

Logic II

This course deals with various non-classical logical systems. It requires familiarity with standard propositional and predicate logic (first-order logical calculus), including derivations and tableaux. The course is divided into three parts: modal logic (we will cover basic as well as normal modal logics); multi-value logic (such as Jan Łukasiewicz’s three-value logic), and intuitionist logic (e.g., possible-worlds semantics). We will cover proofs, theorems as well as paradoxes, from each section. Graham Priest’s Introduction to Non-Classical Logic: From If to Is will be the main text used in the course.

 

Logic II

Logic II

This course deals with various non-classical logical systems. It requires familiarity with standard propositional and predicate logic (first-order logical calculus), including derivations and tableaux. The course is divided into three parts: modal logic (we will cover basic as well as normal modal logics); multi-value logic (such as Jan Łukasiewicz’s three-value logic), and intuitionist logic (e.g., possible-worlds semantics). We will cover proofs, theorems as well as paradoxes, from each section. Graham Priest’s Introduction to Non-Classical Logic: From If to Is will be the main text used in the course.

 

Logic II

Logic II

This course deals with various non-classical logical systems. It requires familiarity with standard propositional and predicate logic (first-order logical calculus), including derivations and tableaux. The course is divided into three parts: modal logic (we will cover basic as well as normal modal logics); multi-value logic (such as Jan Łukasiewicz’s three-value logic), and intuitionist logic (e.g., possible-worlds semantics). We will cover proofs, theorems as well as paradoxes, from each section. Graham Priest’s Introduction to Non-Classical Logic: From If to Is will be the main text used in the course.

 

Medieval, modern and contemporary theological debates on the idea of ​​”God”

For a long time, thinking and naming “God” has been the subject of debate, discussion, and philosophical and theological choices. After centuries of working to do this, various types of atheism have come to proclaim the non-existence of this “God”. The course intends to introduce these questions and place them in their historical contexts, both ecclesial, social and intellectual. This course will do so starting from three important modern ideas: “personal God”, God as “the Absolute” and God as “All Other”.

Metaphysics

Metaphysics starts from the consideration of the being which is found in sensibly evident things and ends with the consideration of God as creator. In this course a brief survey of the history of metaphysics is given, together with discussions of being as divided by categories, being as divided by actuality and potentiality, and being as characterized by truth and goodness.

Metaphysics

Metaphysics starts from the consideration of the being which is found in sensibly evident things and ends with the consideration of God as creator. In this course a brief survey of the history of metaphysics is given, together with discussions of being as divided by categories, being as divided by actuality and potentiality, and being as characterized by truth and goodness.

Metaphysics

Metaphysics starts from the consideration of the being which is found in sensibly evident things and ends with the consideration of God as creator. In this course a brief survey of the history of metaphysics is given, together with discussions of being as divided by categories, being as divided by actuality and potentiality, and being as characterized by truth and goodness.

Metaphysics

Metaphysics starts from the consideration of the being which is found in sensibly evident things and ends with the consideration of God as creator. In this course a brief survey of the history of metaphysics is given, together with discussions of being as divided by categories, being as divided by actuality and potentiality, and being as characterized by truth and goodness.

Méthodes théologiques / Theological Methods (M.A.Th.)

Méthodes théologiques / Theological Methods (M.A.Th.) 

Ce cours vise à initier les étudiants aux méthodes théologiques et à les accompagner dans l’élaboration de leur projet de recherche. Il sera constitué de trois modules. Dans le premier module, les étudiants seront initiés à la méthodologie et au travail de recherche en théologie. Ils seront guidés dans la formulation de leur projet de recherche et dans le choix d’une méthode/approche en théologie. Les deux autres modules exposeront respectivement les différentes méthodes dans le champ des sources théologiques (exégèse, histoire) et dans celui de la réflexion théologique (théologie systématique/fondamentale, éthique).

This course aims to introduce students to theological methods and assist them in developing their research project. It consists of three modules. In the first module, students will be introduced to methodology and research in theology. They will be guided in the formulation of their research project and the choice of method or approach in their theological domain. The other two modules exhibit respectively different methods in the field of theological sources (exegesis, history) and in the field of theological reflection (systematic theology, ethics).

Méthodes théologiques / Theological Methods (M.A.Th.)

Méthodes théologiques / Theological Methods (M.A.Th.) 

Ce cours vise à initier les étudiants aux méthodes théologiques et à les accompagner dans l’élaboration de leur projet de recherche. Il sera constitué de trois modules. Dans le premier module, les étudiants seront initiés à la méthodologie et au travail de recherche en théologie. Ils seront guidés dans la formulation de leur projet de recherche et dans le choix d’une méthode/approche en théologie. Les deux autres modules exposeront respectivement les différentes méthodes dans le champ des sources théologiques (exégèse, histoire) et dans celui de la réflexion théologique (théologie systématique/fondamentale, éthique).

This course aims to introduce students to theological methods and assist them in developing their research project. It consists of three modules. In the first module, students will be introduced to methodology and research in theology. They will be guided in the formulation of their research project and the choice of method or approach in their theological domain. The other two modules exhibit respectively different methods in the field of theological sources (exegesis, history) and in the field of theological reflection (systematic theology, ethics).

Méthodes théologiques / Theological Methods (M.A.Th.)

Méthodes théologiques / Theological Methods (M.A.Th.) 

Ce cours vise à initier les étudiants aux méthodes théologiques et à les accompagner dans l’élaboration de leur projet de recherche. Il sera constitué de trois modules. Dans le premier module, les étudiants seront initiés à la méthodologie et au travail de recherche en théologie. Ils seront guidés dans la formulation de leur projet de recherche et dans le choix d’une méthode/approche en théologie. Les deux autres modules exposeront respectivement les différentes méthodes dans le champ des sources théologiques (exégèse, histoire) et dans celui de la réflexion théologique (théologie systématique/fondamentale, éthique).

This course aims to introduce students to theological methods and assist them in developing their research project. It consists of three modules. In the first module, students will be introduced to methodology and research in theology. They will be guided in the formulation of their research project and the choice of method or approach in their theological domain. The other two modules exhibit respectively different methods in the field of theological sources (exegesis, history) and in the field of theological reflection (systematic theology, ethics).

Méthodes théologiques / Theological Methods (M.A.Th.)

Méthodes théologiques / Theological Methods (M.A.Th.) 

Ce cours vise à initier les étudiants aux méthodes théologiques et à les accompagner dans l’élaboration de leur projet de recherche. Il sera constitué de trois modules. Dans le premier module, les étudiants seront initiés à la méthodologie et au travail de recherche en théologie. Ils seront guidés dans la formulation de leur projet de recherche et dans le choix d’une méthode/approche en théologie. Les deux autres modules exposeront respectivement les différentes méthodes dans le champ des sources théologiques (exégèse, histoire) et dans celui de la réflexion théologique (théologie systématique/fondamentale, éthique).

This course aims to introduce students to theological methods and assist them in developing their research project. It consists of three modules. In the first module, students will be introduced to methodology and research in theology. They will be guided in the formulation of their research project and the choice of method or approach in their theological domain. The other two modules exhibit respectively different methods in the field of theological sources (exegesis, history) and in the field of theological reflection (systematic theology, ethics).

Méthodes théologiques / Theological Methods (PH.D.)

Méthodes théologiques / Theological Methods (PH.D.) 

Ce cours vise à initier les étudiants aux méthodes théologiques et à les accompagner dans l’élaboration de leur projet de recherche. Il sera constitué de trois modules. Dans le premier module, les étudiants seront initiés à la méthodologie et au travail de recherche en théologie. Ils seront guidés dans la formulation de leur projet de recherche et dans le choix d’une méthode/approche en théologie. Les deux autres modules exposeront respectivement les différentes méthodes dans le champ des sources théologiques (exégèse, histoire) et dans celui de la réflexion théologique (théologie systématique/fondamentale, éthique).

This course aims to introduce students to theological methods and assist them in developing their research project. It consists of three modules. In the first module, students will be introduced to methodology and research in theology. They will be guided in the formulation of their research project and the choice of method or approach in their theological domain. The other two modules exhibit respectively different methods in the field of theological sources (exegesis, history) and in the field of theological reflection (systematic theology, ethics).

Méthodes théologiques / Theological Methods (PH.D.)

Méthodes théologiques / Theological Methods (PH.D.) 

Ce cours vise à initier les étudiants aux méthodes théologiques et à les accompagner dans l’élaboration de leur projet de recherche. Il sera constitué de trois modules. Dans le premier module, les étudiants seront initiés à la méthodologie et au travail de recherche en théologie. Ils seront guidés dans la formulation de leur projet de recherche et dans le choix d’une méthode/approche en théologie. Les deux autres modules exposeront respectivement les différentes méthodes dans le champ des sources théologiques (exégèse, histoire) et dans celui de la réflexion théologique (théologie systématique/fondamentale, éthique).

This course aims to introduce students to theological methods and assist them in developing their research project. It consists of three modules. In the first module, students will be introduced to methodology and research in theology. They will be guided in the formulation of their research project and the choice of method or approach in their theological domain. The other two modules exhibit respectively different methods in the field of theological sources (exegesis, history) and in the field of theological reflection (systematic theology, ethics).

Méthodes théologiques / Theological Methods (PH.D.)

Méthodes théologiques / Theological Methods (PH.D.) 

Ce cours vise à initier les étudiants aux méthodes théologiques et à les accompagner dans l’élaboration de leur projet de recherche. Il sera constitué de trois modules. Dans le premier module, les étudiants seront initiés à la méthodologie et au travail de recherche en théologie. Ils seront guidés dans la formulation de leur projet de recherche et dans le choix d’une méthode/approche en théologie. Les deux autres modules exposeront respectivement les différentes méthodes dans le champ des sources théologiques (exégèse, histoire) et dans celui de la réflexion théologique (théologie systématique/fondamentale, éthique).

This course aims to introduce students to theological methods and assist them in developing their research project. It consists of three modules. In the first module, students will be introduced to methodology and research in theology. They will be guided in the formulation of their research project and the choice of method or approach in their theological domain. The other two modules exhibit respectively different methods in the field of theological sources (exegesis, history) and in the field of theological reflection (systematic theology, ethics).

Méthodes théologiques / Theological Methods (PH.D.)

Méthodes théologiques / Theological Methods (PH.D.) 

Ce cours vise à initier les étudiants aux méthodes théologiques et à les accompagner dans l’élaboration de leur projet de recherche. Il sera constitué de trois modules. Dans le premier module, les étudiants seront initiés à la méthodologie et au travail de recherche en théologie. Ils seront guidés dans la formulation de leur projet de recherche et dans le choix d’une méthode/approche en théologie. Les deux autres modules exposeront respectivement les différentes méthodes dans le champ des sources théologiques (exégèse, histoire) et dans celui de la réflexion théologique (théologie systématique/fondamentale, éthique).

This course aims to introduce students to theological methods and assist them in developing their research project. It consists of three modules. In the first module, students will be introduced to methodology and research in theology. They will be guided in the formulation of their research project and the choice of method or approach in their theological domain. The other two modules exhibit respectively different methods in the field of theological sources (exegesis, history) and in the field of theological reflection (systematic theology, ethics).

Methodological Seminar

It is a methodological seminar for the elaboration of research projects and the development of skills suitable for a scientific research at the master's and doctoral levels: definition, presentation, criticism. This seminar is animated by some professors of the Faculty according to the areas of excellence.

Methodological Seminar – Graduate course

It is a methodological seminar for the elaboration of research projects and the development of skills suitable for a scientific research at the master’s and doctoral levels: definition, presentation, criticism. This seminar is animated by some professors of the Faculty according to the areas of excellence.

Methodological Seminar

It is a methodological seminar for the elaboration of research projects and the development of skills suitable for a scientific research at the master's and doctoral levels: definition, presentation, criticism. This seminar is animated by some professors of the Faculty according to the areas of excellence.

Methodological Seminar

It is a methodological seminar for the elaboration of research projects and the development of skills suitable for a scientific research at the master's and doctoral levels: definition, presentation, criticism. This seminar is animated by some professors of the Faculty according to the areas of excellence.

Methodological Seminar

It is a methodological seminar for the elaboration of research projects and the development of skills suitable for a scientific research at the master's and doctoral levels: definition, presentation, criticism. This seminar is animated by some professors of the Faculty according to the areas of excellence.

Methodological Seminar

It is a methodological seminar for the elaboration of research projects and the development of skills suitable for a scientific research at the master's and doctoral levels: definition, presentation, criticism. This seminar is animated by some professors of the Faculty according to the areas of excellence.

Methodological Seminar

It is a methodological seminar for the elaboration of research projects and the development of skills suitable for a scientific research at the master's and doctoral levels: definition, presentation, criticism. This seminar is animated by some professors of the Faculty according to the areas of excellence.

Methodological Seminar

It is a methodological seminar for the elaboration of research projects and the development of skills suitable for a scientific research at the master's and doctoral levels: definition, presentation, criticism. This seminar is animated by some professors of the Faculty according to the areas of excellence.

Methodological Seminar

It is a methodological seminar for the elaboration of research projects and the development of skills suitable for a scientific research at the master's and doctoral levels: definition, presentation, criticism. This seminar is animated by some professors of the Faculty according to the areas of excellence.

‘’My soul is exceeding sorrowful unto death’’

To appraise the sorrowfulness of Jesus proved to be a fruitful challenge for several theologies of Incarnation, Martyrdom and Passion, especially in the West. This seminar will investigate the manifold reception of the words of Christ at Gethsemane: ‘’My soul is exceeding sorrowful unto death’’ (MK 14:34), by Augustine of Hippo, Thomas Aquinas, Thomas More and John Henry Newman. Once the affinities and divergences between them will be brought to light, the seminar will question how far Jesus’ sadness expresses some quality of God. Each student

‘’My soul is exceeding sorrowful unto death’’

To appraise the sorrowfulness of Jesus proved to be a fruitful challenge for several theologies of Incarnation, Martyrdom and Passion, especially in the West. This seminar will investigate the manifold reception of the words of Christ at Gethsemane: ‘’My soul is exceeding sorrowful unto death’’ (MK 14:34), by Augustine of Hippo, Thomas Aquinas, Thomas More and John Henry Newman. Once the affinities and divergences between them will be brought to light, the seminar will question how far Jesus’ sadness expresses some quality of God. Each student

‘’My soul is exceeding sorrowful unto death’’

To appraise the sorrowfulness of Jesus proved to be a fruitful challenge for several theologies of Incarnation, Martyrdom and Passion, especially in the West. This seminar will investigate the manifold reception of the words of Christ at Gethsemane: ‘’My soul is exceeding sorrowful unto death’’ (MK 14:34), by Augustine of Hippo, Thomas Aquinas, Thomas More and John Henry Newman. Once the affinities and divergences between them will be brought to light, the seminar will question how far Jesus’ sadness expresses some quality of God. Each student

‘’My soul is exceeding sorrowful unto death’’

To appraise the sorrowfulness of Jesus proved to be a fruitful challenge for several theologies of Incarnation, Martyrdom and Passion, especially in the West. This seminar will investigate the manifold reception of the words of Christ at Gethsemane: ‘’My soul is exceeding sorrowful unto death’’ (MK 14:34), by Augustine of Hippo, Thomas Aquinas, Thomas More and John Henry Newman. Once the affinities and divergences between them will be brought to light, the seminar will question how far Jesus’ sadness expresses some quality of God. Each student

Neo-Platonism

Neo-Platonism

 

The history of Greek philosophy spans a period of roughly a thousand years from the time of the Pre-Socratic to the Neo-Platonists.  The last great epoch in Greek philosophy, the Neo-Platonic period, includes such authors as Plotinus, Iamblichus, and Proclus. The Neo-Platonists had an enormous influence on later authors:  directly on Augustine, Nicolaus of Cusa, various Renaissance figures, the German idealists, particularly Hegel; and indirectly, through Dionysius the Areopagite, on such figures as Scotus Erigena, and Aquinas.  This course will enable students to study Neo-Platonic texts both for themselves and in the context of their influence on later philosophical history.

Neo-Platonism

Neo-Platonism

 

The history of Greek philosophy spans a period of roughly a thousand years from the time of the Pre-Socratic to the Neo-Platonists.  The last great epoch in Greek philosophy, the Neo-Platonic period, includes such authors as Plotinus, Iamblichus, and Proclus. The Neo-Platonists had an enormous influence on later authors:  directly on Augustine, Nicolaus of Cusa, various Renaissance figures, the German idealists, particularly Hegel; and indirectly, through Dionysius the Areopagite, on such figures as Scotus Erigena, and Aquinas.  This course will enable students to study Neo-Platonic texts both for themselves and in the context of their influence on later philosophical history.

Neo-Platonism

Neo-Platonism

 

The history of Greek philosophy spans a period of roughly a thousand years from the time of the Pre-Socratic to the Neo-Platonists.  The last great epoch in Greek philosophy, the Neo-Platonic period, includes such authors as Plotinus, Iamblichus, and Proclus. The Neo-Platonists had an enormous influence on later authors:  directly on Augustine, Nicolaus of Cusa, various Renaissance figures, the German idealists, particularly Hegel; and indirectly, through Dionysius the Areopagite, on such figures as Scotus Erigena, and Aquinas.  This course will enable students to study Neo-Platonic texts both for themselves and in the context of their influence on later philosophical history.

Neo-Platonism

Neo-Platonism

 

The history of Greek philosophy spans a period of roughly a thousand years from the time of the Pre-Socratic to the Neo-Platonists.  The last great epoch in Greek philosophy, the Neo-Platonic period, includes such authors as Plotinus, Iamblichus, and Proclus. The Neo-Platonists had an enormous influence on later authors:  directly on Augustine, Nicolaus of Cusa, various Renaissance figures, the German idealists, particularly Hegel; and indirectly, through Dionysius the Areopagite, on such figures as Scotus Erigena, and Aquinas.  This course will enable students to study Neo-Platonic texts both for themselves and in the context of their influence on later philosophical history.

Nietzsche’s Moral Philosophy

Issues of value and morality occupy a large part of Nietzsche’s works. While he is often interpreted as being an anti-realist about value and as rejecting the objective truth of any moral theory, Nietzsche is, at the same time, concerned about the health and flourishing of culture and the species and talks of higher and lower moralities. Nietzsche appears to worry about the threat of nihilism and radical moral relativism, though scholars have struggled to extract a positive moral theory from his writings. This course will look at Nietzsche’s comments on values and morality, as well as works by contemporary philosophers (Brian Leiter, Phillipa Foot, Christopher Janaway, Christine Swanton, Robert Solomon, Mark Alfano) who cast him variously as a moral psychologist, a virtue ethicist, and as a naturalist about goodness.

Old Testament II: Introduction to the Prophetical Books

Old Testament II: Introduction to the Prophetical Books

This course will offer a general introduction to prophetism (what is a prophet, extrabiblical prophetism, history of the movement, main features, literary genres, etc.). Then each Biblical prophet will be studied in chronological order (Elijah, Elisha, Amos, Hosea, First Isaiah, Micah, Zephaniah, Nahum, Habaquq, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, Second Isaiah, Haggai, Zechariah, Malachi, Third Isaiah, Obadiah, Joel).

Old Testament II: Introduction to the Prophetical Books

Old Testament II: Introduction to the Prophetical Books

This course will offer a general introduction to prophetism (what is a prophet, extrabiblical prophetism, history of the movement, main features, literary genres, etc.). Then each Biblical prophet will be studied in chronological order (Elijah, Elisha, Amos, Hosea, First Isaiah, Micah, Zephaniah, Nahum, Habaquq, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, Second Isaiah, Haggai, Zechariah, Malachi, Third Isaiah, Obadiah, Joel).

Old Testament II: Introduction to the Prophetical Books

Old Testament II: Introduction to the Prophetical Books

This course will offer a general introduction to prophetism (what is a prophet, extrabiblical prophetism, history of the movement, main features, literary genres, etc.). Then each Biblical prophet will be studied in chronological order (Elijah, Elisha, Amos, Hosea, First Isaiah, Micah, Zephaniah, Nahum, Habaquq, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, Second Isaiah, Haggai, Zechariah, Malachi, Third Isaiah, Obadiah, Joel).

Old Testament II: Introduction to the Prophetical Books

Old Testament II: Introduction to the Prophetical Books

This course will offer a general introduction to prophetism (what is a prophet, extrabiblical prophetism, history of the movement, main features, literary genres, etc.). Then each Biblical prophet will be studied in chronological order (Elijah, Elisha, Amos, Hosea, First Isaiah, Micah, Zephaniah, Nahum, Habaquq, Jeremiah, Ezekiel, Second Isaiah, Haggai, Zechariah, Malachi, Third Isaiah, Obadiah, Joel).

Old Testament III : Introduction to Wisdom Books

This course will present a general introduction to the wisdom movement: its definition, origin, social setting, main features, teaching, etc. Then, the wisdom books will be studied in a chronological order: Proverbs, Job, Song of Songs, Qohelet, Sirac and Wisdom of Solomon.

Old Testament III : Introduction to Wisdom Books

This course will present a general introduction to the wisdom movement: its definition, origin, social setting, main features, teaching, etc. Then, the wisdom books will be studied in a chronological order: Proverbs, Job, Song of Songs, Qohelet, Sirac and Wisdom of Solomon.

Old Testament III : Introduction to Wisdom Books

This course will present a general introduction to the wisdom movement: its definition, origin, social setting, main features, teaching, etc. Then, the wisdom books will be studied in a chronological order: Proverbs, Job, Song of Songs, Qohelet, Sirac and Wisdom of Solomon.

Old Testament III : Introduction to Wisdom Books

This course will present a general introduction to the wisdom movement: its definition, origin, social setting, main features, teaching, etc. Then, the wisdom books will be studied in a chronological order: Proverbs, Job, Song of Songs, Qohelet, Sirac and Wisdom of Solomon.

Passion and Action: Witnesses of Justice

Passion and Action: Witnesses of Justice
(Videoconference from the IPD) 

 

The commitment for justice and peace is at the heart of the proclamation of the Gospel. During the Church’s history, outstanding people have been witnesses of this commitment, in a passionate and active way, giving faces and hands to the social doctrine of the Church. This course introduces some of these witnesses, from Las Casas and Dorothy Day to Vincent de Paul, Marguerite d’Youville and others. We will look at their social and ecclesial context, their personal journey, their theological vision and their forms of action.

Passion and Action: Witnesses of Justice

Passion and Action: Witnesses of Justice
(Videoconference from the IPD) 

 

The commitment for justice and peace is at the heart of the proclamation of the Gospel. During the Church’s history, outstanding people have been witnesses of this commitment, in a passionate and active way, giving faces and hands to the social doctrine of the Church. This course introduces some of these witnesses, from Las Casas and Dorothy Day to Vincent de Paul, Marguerite d’Youville and others. We will look at their social and ecclesial context, their personal journey, their theological vision and their forms of action.

Passion and Action: Witnesses of Justice

Passion and Action: Witnesses of Justice
(Videoconference from the IPD) 

 

The commitment for justice and peace is at the heart of the proclamation of the Gospel. During the Church’s history, outstanding people have been witnesses of this commitment, in a passionate and active way, giving faces and hands to the social doctrine of the Church. This course introduces some of these witnesses, from Las Casas and Dorothy Day to Vincent de Paul, Marguerite d’Youville and others. We will look at their social and ecclesial context, their personal journey, their theological vision and their forms of action.

Paul Ricoeur’s Philosophy of History

Philosophy of History has been a steady concern through the philosophical works of Paul Ricoeur. From Histoire et vérité (1955) to Temps et récit (1981-83), to La mémoire, l’histoire, l’oubli (2003), Ricoeur has taken position and innovated in the philosophy of history. This seminar will examine this ricoeurian contribution, establishing the paths and landmarks of its evolution, and contrasting it to major contemporary trends in Philosophy of history.

Philosophical Anthropology

Philosophical Anthropology

Since the dawn of philosophy as an academic discipline, thinkers have asked what makes a human,  human, is there such a thing as human nature, is it universal or culturally-dependent, are humans really different than the rest of the animal kingdom?

Students in this course will deliberate and expand on some of the main features of human nature and humanness, namely languagehistoricitycorporeityconsciousnessfreedom, and play. Pre-established views will be analyzed and challenged in order for students to form their own understanding of philosophical anthropology.  At the end of this course, students will be able to propose their own personal view of human nature and the philosophical question of the meaning of life.

This course will use a transformative approach to learning. It will be structured around lectures, will include individual text analysis and reflection, supplemented by in-class discussions.  Assessment will be conducted through written exams and class presentations.

Philosophical Anthropology

Philosophical Anthropology

Since the dawn of philosophy as an academic discipline, thinkers have asked what makes a human,  human, is there such a thing as human nature, is it universal or culturally-dependent, are humans really different than the rest of the animal kingdom?

Students in this course will deliberate and expand on some of the main features of human nature and humanness, namely languagehistoricitycorporeityconsciousnessfreedom, and play. Pre-established views will be analyzed and challenged in order for students to form their own understanding of philosophical anthropology.  At the end of this course, students will be able to propose their own personal view of human nature and the philosophical question of the meaning of life.

This course will use a transformative approach to learning. It will be structured around lectures, will include individual text analysis and reflection, supplemented by in-class discussions.  Assessment will be conducted through written exams and class presentations.

Philosophical Anthropology

Philosophical Anthropology

Since the dawn of philosophy as an academic discipline, thinkers have asked what makes a human,  human, is there such a thing as human nature, is it universal or culturally-dependent, are humans really different than the rest of the animal kingdom?

Students in this course will deliberate and expand on some of the main features of human nature and humanness, namely languagehistoricitycorporeityconsciousnessfreedom, and play. Pre-established views will be analyzed and challenged in order for students to form their own understanding of philosophical anthropology.  At the end of this course, students will be able to propose their own personal view of human nature and the philosophical question of the meaning of life.

This course will use a transformative approach to learning. It will be structured around lectures, will include individual text analysis and reflection, supplemented by in-class discussions.  Assessment will be conducted through written exams and class presentations.

Philosophical Anthropology

Philosophical Anthropology

Since the dawn of philosophy as an academic discipline, thinkers have asked what makes a human,  human, is there such a thing as human nature, is it universal or culturally-dependent, are humans really different than the rest of the animal kingdom?

Students in this course will deliberate and expand on some of the main features of human nature and humanness, namely languagehistoricitycorporeityconsciousnessfreedom, and play. Pre-established views will be analyzed and challenged in order for students to form their own understanding of philosophical anthropology.  At the end of this course, students will be able to propose their own personal view of human nature and the philosophical question of the meaning of life.

This course will use a transformative approach to learning. It will be structured around lectures, will include individual text analysis and reflection, supplemented by in-class discussions.  Assessment will be conducted through written exams and class presentations.

Philosophical Thought of Thomas Aquinas

In this course, we present (1) the life and works of St. Thomas (the university institutions in XIIIth century Paris, the different types of literary product found among Thomas’s writings and the occasion of their composition), and (2) some major philosophical themes: creation and the possibility of an eternal world; God’s knowledge of things other than himself; the intrinsic coherence of the human being; morality and man the image of God.

Philosophical Thought of Thomas Aquinas

In this course, we present (1) the life and works of St. Thomas (the university institutions in XIIIth century Paris, the different types of literary product found among Thomas’s writings and the occasion of their composition), and (2) some major philosophical themes: creation and the possibility of an eternal world; God’s knowledge of things other than himself; the intrinsic coherence of the human being; morality and man the image of God.

Philosophical Thought of Thomas Aquinas

In this course, we present (1) the life and works of St. Thomas (the university institutions in XIIIth century Paris, the different types of literary product found among Thomas’s writings and the occasion of their composition), and (2) some major philosophical themes: creation and the possibility of an eternal world; God’s knowledge of things other than himself; the intrinsic coherence of the human being; morality and man the image of God.

Philosophical Thought of Thomas Aquinas

In this course, we present (1) the life and works of St. Thomas (the university institutions in XIIIth century Paris, the different types of literary product found among Thomas’s writings and the occasion of their composition), and (2) some major philosophical themes: creation and the possibility of an eternal world; God’s knowledge of things other than himself; the intrinsic coherence of the human being; morality and man the image of God.

Philosophie de l’histoire / Philosophy of History

Philosophie de l'histoire / Philosophy of History​ (bilingue / bilingual)

Dans ce cours, les étudiant-es vont explorer la philosophie de l’histoire. Philosophiquement, l’histoire peut être conçue comme objet, comme science humaine, comme mode d’interprétation ou comme mode de construction. Les étudiant-es vont donc se familiariser avec plusieurs approches en philosophie de l’histoire que l’on rencontre dans bien des débats contemporains en philosophie et dans la sphère publique. Les étudiant-es parcourront ainsi l’approche spéculative, de Saint-Augustin à Hegel et ses critiques, Marx et Nietzsche; l’approche épistémologique, qui inclut les perspectives critique (R. Aron) et analytique (Hempel, Dray), l’approche narrativiste, qui considère l’entrecroisement de l’histoire et du récit (P. Ricoeur) et l’approche post-moderniste et post structuraliste (JF Lyotard, M. Foucault).

In this course, students will explore the philosophy of history. Philosophically, history can be understood as an object, as a human science, as a mode of interpretation or as a mode of construction. Students will therefore become familiar with several approaches to the philosophy of history that we encounter in many contemporary debates in philosophy and in the public sphere. Students will thus explore the speculative approach, from Saint Augustine to Hegel and his critics, Marx and Nietzsche; the epistemological approach, which includes the critical (R. Aron) and analytical (Hempel, Dray) perspectives, the narrativist approach, which considers the interweaving of history and narrative (P. Ricoeur) and the post -modernist and post-structuralist (JF Lyotard, M. Foucault).

Philosophie de l’histoire / Philosophy of History

Philosophie de l'histoire / Philosophy of History​ (bilingue / bilingual)

Dans ce cours, les étudiant-es vont explorer la philosophie de l’histoire. Philosophiquement, l’histoire peut être conçue comme objet, comme science humaine, comme mode d’interprétation ou comme mode de construction. Les étudiant-es vont donc se familiariser avec plusieurs approches en philosophie de l’histoire que l’on rencontre dans bien des débats contemporains en philosophie et dans la sphère publique. Les étudiant-es parcourront ainsi l’approche spéculative, de Saint-Augustin à Hegel et ses critiques, Marx et Nietzsche; l’approche épistémologique, qui inclut les perspectives critique (R. Aron) et analytique (Hempel, Dray), l’approche narrativiste, qui considère l’entrecroisement de l’histoire et du récit (P. Ricoeur) et l’approche post-moderniste et post structuraliste (JF Lyotard, M. Foucault).

In this course, students will explore the philosophy of history. Philosophically, history can be understood as an object, as a human science, as a mode of interpretation or as a mode of construction. Students will therefore become familiar with several approaches to the philosophy of history that we encounter in many contemporary debates in philosophy and in the public sphere. Students will thus explore the speculative approach, from Saint Augustine to Hegel and his critics, Marx and Nietzsche; the epistemological approach, which includes the critical (R. Aron) and analytical (Hempel, Dray) perspectives, the narrativist approach, which considers the interweaving of history and narrative (P. Ricoeur) and the post -modernist and post-structuralist (JF Lyotard, M. Foucault).

Philosophie de l’histoire / Philosophy of History

Philosophie de l'histoire / Philosophy of History​ (bilingue / bilingual)

Dans ce cours, les étudiant-es vont explorer la philosophie de l’histoire. Philosophiquement, l’histoire peut être conçue comme objet, comme science humaine, comme mode d’interprétation ou comme mode de construction. Les étudiant-es vont donc se familiariser avec plusieurs approches en philosophie de l’histoire que l’on rencontre dans bien des débats contemporains en philosophie et dans la sphère publique. Les étudiant-es parcourront ainsi l’approche spéculative, de Saint-Augustin à Hegel et ses critiques, Marx et Nietzsche; l’approche épistémologique, qui inclut les perspectives critique (R. Aron) et analytique (Hempel, Dray), l’approche narrativiste, qui considère l’entrecroisement de l’histoire et du récit (P. Ricoeur) et l’approche post-moderniste et post structuraliste (JF Lyotard, M. Foucault).

In this course, students will explore the philosophy of history. Philosophically, history can be understood as an object, as a human science, as a mode of interpretation or as a mode of construction. Students will therefore become familiar with several approaches to the philosophy of history that we encounter in many contemporary debates in philosophy and in the public sphere. Students will thus explore the speculative approach, from Saint Augustine to Hegel and his critics, Marx and Nietzsche; the epistemological approach, which includes the critical (R. Aron) and analytical (Hempel, Dray) perspectives, the narrativist approach, which considers the interweaving of history and narrative (P. Ricoeur) and the post -modernist and post-structuralist (JF Lyotard, M. Foucault).

Philosophie de l’histoire / Philosophy of History

Philosophie de l'histoire / Philosophy of History​ (bilingue / bilingual)

Dans ce cours, les étudiant-es vont explorer la philosophie de l’histoire. Philosophiquement, l’histoire peut être conçue comme objet, comme science humaine, comme mode d’interprétation ou comme mode de construction. Les étudiant-es vont donc se familiariser avec plusieurs approches en philosophie de l’histoire que l’on rencontre dans bien des débats contemporains en philosophie et dans la sphère publique. Les étudiant-es parcourront ainsi l’approche spéculative, de Saint-Augustin à Hegel et ses critiques, Marx et Nietzsche; l’approche épistémologique, qui inclut les perspectives critique (R. Aron) et analytique (Hempel, Dray), l’approche narrativiste, qui considère l’entrecroisement de l’histoire et du récit (P. Ricoeur) et l’approche post-moderniste et post structuraliste (JF Lyotard, M. Foucault).

In this course, students will explore the philosophy of history. Philosophically, history can be understood as an object, as a human science, as a mode of interpretation or as a mode of construction. Students will therefore become familiar with several approaches to the philosophy of history that we encounter in many contemporary debates in philosophy and in the public sphere. Students will thus explore the speculative approach, from Saint Augustine to Hegel and his critics, Marx and Nietzsche; the epistemological approach, which includes the critical (R. Aron) and analytical (Hempel, Dray) perspectives, the narrativist approach, which considers the interweaving of history and narrative (P. Ricoeur) and the post -modernist and post-structuralist (JF Lyotard, M. Foucault).

Philosophy of History

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Philosophy of History

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Philosophy of History

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Philosophy of History

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Philosophy of Law

Philosophy of Law

This course explores competing philosophical theories of the origin and nature of the law. Positive and natural law primarily will be contrasted, analyzed and critically evaluated within the overall context of the philosophical tradition and the history of philosophy. The goal of the course is to provide some general philosophical frameworks for understanding the nature of law and its relation to ethics, the organization of civil society and the state. On occasion the philosophical analysis of the law will be complemented with practical examples from statutory materials, case law and contemporary legal debates.

Philosophy of Law

Philosophy of Law

This course explores competing philosophical theories of the origin and nature of the law. Positive and natural law primarily will be contrasted, analyzed and critically evaluated within the overall context of the philosophical tradition and the history of philosophy. The goal of the course is to provide some general philosophical frameworks for understanding the nature of law and its relation to ethics, the organization of civil society and the state. On occasion the philosophical analysis of the law will be complemented with practical examples from statutory materials, case law and contemporary legal debates.

Philosophy of Law

Philosophy of Law

This course explores competing philosophical theories of the origin and nature of the law. Positive and natural law primarily will be contrasted, analyzed and critically evaluated within the overall context of the philosophical tradition and the history of philosophy. The goal of the course is to provide some general philosophical frameworks for understanding the nature of law and its relation to ethics, the organization of civil society and the state. On occasion the philosophical analysis of the law will be complemented with practical examples from statutory materials, case law and contemporary legal debates.

Philosophy of Law

Philosophy of Law

This course explores competing philosophical theories of the origin and nature of the law. Positive and natural law primarily will be contrasted, analyzed and critically evaluated within the overall context of the philosophical tradition and the history of philosophy. The goal of the course is to provide some general philosophical frameworks for understanding the nature of law and its relation to ethics, the organization of civil society and the state. On occasion the philosophical analysis of the law will be complemented with practical examples from statutory materials, case law and contemporary legal debates.

Philosophy of Love

Philosophy of Love

 

Love is a fundamental aspect of human existence. It is a central principle to every discussion on happiness. The philosophy of love asks about the nature and kinds of love. What is love? Is it an emotion or a choice? If nonegoistic love is possible, then how so? If there different kinds of love, then what are they?  The problem of love is the perennial dilemma centered around egoism and altruism, self-interest and self-denial, self-centeredness and disinterestedness. What is the proper relationship between the love that one bears for oneself and the love that one bears for another human or for God?

Philosophy of Love

Philosophy of Love

 

Love is a fundamental aspect of human existence. It is a central principle to every discussion on happiness. The philosophy of love asks about the nature and kinds of love. What is love? Is it an emotion or a choice? If nonegoistic love is possible, then how so? If there different kinds of love, then what are they?  The problem of love is the perennial dilemma centered around egoism and altruism, self-interest and self-denial, self-centeredness and disinterestedness. What is the proper relationship between the love that one bears for oneself and the love that one bears for another human or for God?

Philosophy of Love

Philosophy of Love

 

Love is a fundamental aspect of human existence. It is a central principle to every discussion on happiness. The philosophy of love asks about the nature and kinds of love. What is love? Is it an emotion or a choice? If nonegoistic love is possible, then how so? If there different kinds of love, then what are they?  The problem of love is the perennial dilemma centered around egoism and altruism, self-interest and self-denial, self-centeredness and disinterestedness. What is the proper relationship between the love that one bears for oneself and the love that one bears for another human or for God?

Philosophy of Love

Philosophy of Love

 

Love is a fundamental aspect of human existence. It is a central principle to every discussion on happiness. The philosophy of love asks about the nature and kinds of love. What is love? Is it an emotion or a choice? If nonegoistic love is possible, then how so? If there different kinds of love, then what are they?  The problem of love is the perennial dilemma centered around egoism and altruism, self-interest and self-denial, self-centeredness and disinterestedness. What is the proper relationship between the love that one bears for oneself and the love that one bears for another human or for God?

Philosophy of Religion I

Philosophy of Religion I

Through a critical assessment of philosophical discourses on religion in modernity, this course will attempt to map out the current definitions of religions, their anthropological, ethical and metaphysical conditions and claims. This course will be attentive to their limits and relations to definitions produced by sociological and psychoanalytical discourses. The lectures will focus on religious behaviours and acts, and their effects on individuals and groups. This course is not about "God". It will define the place and function of the images and ideas about the divine in religion.

Philosophy of Religion I

Philosophy of Religion I

Through a critical assessment of philosophical discourses on religion in modernity, this course will attempt to map out the current definitions of religions, their anthropological, ethical and metaphysical conditions and claims. This course will be attentive to their limits and relations to definitions produced by sociological and psychoanalytical discourses. The lectures will focus on religious behaviours and acts, and their effects on individuals and groups. This course is not about "God". It will define the place and function of the images and ideas about the divine in religion.

Philosophy of Religion I

Philosophy of Religion I

Through a critical assessment of philosophical discourses on religion in modernity, this course will attempt to map out the current definitions of religions, their anthropological, ethical and metaphysical conditions and claims. This course will be attentive to their limits and relations to definitions produced by sociological and psychoanalytical discourses. The lectures will focus on religious behaviours and acts, and their effects on individuals and groups. This course is not about "God". It will define the place and function of the images and ideas about the divine in religion.

Philosophy of Religion I

Philosophy of Religion I

Through a critical assessment of philosophical discourses on religion in modernity, this course will attempt to map out the current definitions of religions, their anthropological, ethical and metaphysical conditions and claims. This course will be attentive to their limits and relations to definitions produced by sociological and psychoanalytical discourses. The lectures will focus on religious behaviours and acts, and their effects on individuals and groups. This course is not about "God". It will define the place and function of the images and ideas about the divine in religion.

Philosophy of revolution II

This second part of the seminar continues the exploration, from various philosophical perspectives, of what is offered for reflection in the events of uprisings, insurrections, revolutions. After working on the Ancients and the beginning of modernity in 2020, this year’s seminar will focus on the contribution of communist or anarchist thinkers from the end of the 19th century to the beginning of the 20th century. It retains as a background or horizon the notion of emancipation and its various philosophical variations. A question haunts this seminar: How can a state remain or become democratic while promoting change beyond already accepted legal processes?

Philosophy of revolution II

This second part of the seminar continues the exploration, from various philosophical perspectives, of what is offered for reflection in the events of uprisings, insurrections, revolutions. After working on the Ancients and the beginning of modernity in 2020, this year’s seminar will focus on the contribution of communist or anarchist thinkers from the end of the 19th century to the beginning of the 20th century. It retains as a background or horizon the notion of emancipation and its various philosophical variations. A question haunts this seminar: How can a state remain or become democratic while promoting change beyond already accepted legal processes?

Philosophy of revolution II

This second part of the seminar continues the exploration, from various philosophical perspectives, of what is offered for reflection in the events of uprisings, insurrections, revolutions. After working on the Ancients and the beginning of modernity in 2020, this year’s seminar will focus on the contribution of communist or anarchist thinkers from the end of the 19th century to the beginning of the 20th century. It retains as a background or horizon the notion of emancipation and its various philosophical variations. A question haunts this seminar: How can a state remain or become democratic while promoting change beyond already accepted legal processes?

Philosophy of revolution II

This second part of the seminar continues the exploration, from various philosophical perspectives, of what is offered for reflection in the events of uprisings, insurrections, revolutions. After working on the Ancients and the beginning of modernity in 2020, this year’s seminar will focus on the contribution of communist or anarchist thinkers from the end of the 19th century to the beginning of the 20th century. It retains as a background or horizon the notion of emancipation and its various philosophical variations. A question haunts this seminar: How can a state remain or become democratic while promoting change beyond already accepted legal processes?

Philosophy of Science

The course examines basic issues in philosophy of science, such as the nature of scientific knowledge and explanation, the classification of sciences, the evolution of science. The question of justification of scientific theories will be emphasized, from Hume’s critique of induction to models proposed by Hempel and Popper.  

Philosophy of Science

The course examines basic issues in philosophy of science, such as the nature of scientific knowledge and explanation, the classification of sciences, the evolution of science. The question of justification of scientific theories will be emphasized, from Hume’s critique of induction to models proposed by Hempel and Popper.  

Philosophy of Science

The course examines basic issues in philosophy of science, such as the nature of scientific knowledge and explanation, the classification of sciences, the evolution of science. The question of justification of scientific theories will be emphasized, from Hume’s critique of induction to models proposed by Hempel and Popper.  

Philosophy of Science

The course examines basic issues in philosophy of science, such as the nature of scientific knowledge and explanation, the classification of sciences, the evolution of science. The question of justification of scientific theories will be emphasized, from Hume’s critique of induction to models proposed by Hempel and Popper.  

Philosophy of Science and History of Ideas

In the Continental tradition, including French Philosophy, Philosophy, Epistemology of Science and History of Ideas are deeply related. Maybe, this current peaked at the time of L’archéologie du savoir, such as proposed by Michel Foucault. The seminar will try to place this current in its context and to explore the outlook, especially the appropriation of such current by many philosophers of the analytic tradition such as R. Rorty and Ian Hacking, as well as the varieties of epistemological constructivism currently considered in the philosophical and epistemological discussion.

Philosophy of Science and History of Ideas

In the Continental tradition, including French Philosophy, Philosophy, Epistemology of Science and History of Ideas are deeply related. Maybe, this current peaked at the time of L’archéologie du savoir, such as proposed by Michel Foucault. The seminar will try to place this current in its context and to explore the outlook, especially the appropriation of such current by many philosophers of the analytic tradition such as R. Rorty and Ian Hacking, as well as the varieties of epistemological constructivism currently considered in the philosophical and epistemological discussion.

Philosophy of Science and History of Ideas

In the Continental tradition, including French Philosophy, Philosophy, Epistemology of Science and History of Ideas are deeply related. Maybe, this current peaked at the time of L’archéologie du savoir, such as proposed by Michel Foucault. The seminar will try to place this current in its context and to explore the outlook, especially the appropriation of such current by many philosophers of the analytic tradition such as R. Rorty and Ian Hacking, as well as the varieties of epistemological constructivism currently considered in the philosophical and epistemological discussion.

Philosophy of Science and History of Ideas

In the Continental tradition, including French Philosophy, Philosophy, Epistemology of Science and History of Ideas are deeply related. Maybe, this current peaked at the time of L’archéologie du savoir, such as proposed by Michel Foucault. The seminar will try to place this current in its context and to explore the outlook, especially the appropriation of such current by many philosophers of the analytic tradition such as R. Rorty and Ian Hacking, as well as the varieties of epistemological constructivism currently considered in the philosophical and epistemological discussion.

Philosophy of Science and History of Ideas

In the Continental tradition, including French Philosophy, Philosophy, Epistemology of Science and History of Ideas are deeply related. Maybe, this current peaked at the time of L’archéologie du savoir, such as proposed by Michel Foucault. The seminar will try to place this current in its context and to explore the outlook, especially the appropriation of such current by many philosophers of the analytic tradition such as R. Rorty and Ian Hacking, as well as the varieties of epistemological constructivism currently considered in the philosophical and epistemological discussion.

Philosophy of Science and History of Ideas

In the Continental tradition, including French Philosophy, Philosophy, Epistemology of Science and History of Ideas are deeply related. Maybe, this current peaked at the time of L’archéologie du savoir, such as proposed by Michel Foucault. The seminar will try to place this current in its context and to explore the outlook, especially the appropriation of such current by many philosophers of the analytic tradition such as R. Rorty and Ian Hacking, as well as the varieties of epistemological constructivism currently considered in the philosophical and epistemological discussion.

Philosophy of Science and History of Ideas

In the Continental tradition, including French Philosophy, Philosophy, Epistemology of Science and History of Ideas are deeply related. Maybe, this current peaked at the time of L’archéologie du savoir, such as proposed by Michel Foucault. The seminar will try to place this current in its context and to explore the outlook, especially the appropriation of such current by many philosophers of the analytic tradition such as R. Rorty and Ian Hacking, as well as the varieties of epistemological constructivism currently considered in the philosophical and epistemological discussion.

Philosophy of Science and History of Ideas

In the Continental tradition, including French Philosophy, Philosophy, Epistemology of Science and History of Ideas are deeply related. Maybe, this current peaked at the time of L’archéologie du savoir, such as proposed by Michel Foucault. The seminar will try to place this current in its context and to explore the outlook, especially the appropriation of such current by many philosophers of the analytic tradition such as R. Rorty and Ian Hacking, as well as the varieties of epistemological constructivism currently considered in the philosophical and epistemological discussion.

Plato’s Parmenides, Sophist, and Philebus

This seminar is a close examination of the dialectical exercises contained in Plato’s Parmenides that could emanate from a one-sided treatment of either the one or the many. Generally considered by the ancient Greek philosophers as Plato’s most insightful and yet enigmatic dialogue, it has continued to defeat well settled interpretations into modern times. The first part of the seminar will primarily focus on the philosophical and historical context of the dialogue. The second part is a detailed consideration of the individual negative and positive hypotheses in the second section of the Parmenides.  The primary teaching approach for this course is lecture based. Students will be expected to do class presentations and submit a final paper at the end of the semester. At the end of the course, students should be able to identify a cluster of problems with respect to the status of the one and the many, vis-à-vis positive and negative outcomes and the implications of these outcomes for Plato’s theory of forms. Students are expected to demonstrate their ability to engage with Plato’s philosophy by means of seminar presentations, dialogue, and the submission of written work.

Plato’s Parmenides

Plato’s Parmenides

 

This seminar is a close examination of the dialectical exercises contained in Plato’s Parmenides that could emanate from a one-sided treatment of either the one or the many. Generally considered by the ancient Greek philosophers as Plato’s most insightful and yet enigmatic dialogue, it has continued to defeat well settled interpretations into modern times. The first part of the seminar will primarily focus on the philosophical and historical context of the dialogue. The second part is a detailed consideration of the individual negative and positive hypotheses in the second section of the Parmenides.  The primary teaching approach for this course is lecture based. Students will be expected to do class presentations and submit a final paper at the end of the semester. At the end of the course, students should be able to identify a cluster of problems with respect to the status of the one and the many, vis-à-vis positive and negative outcomes and the implications of these outcomes for Plato’s theory of forms. Students are expected to demonstrate their ability to engage with Plato’s philosophy by means of seminar presentations, dialogue, and the submission of written work.

Plato’s Parmenides

Plato’s Parmenides

 

This seminar is a close examination of the dialectical exercises contained in Plato’s Parmenides that could emanate from a one-sided treatment of either the one or the many. Generally considered by the ancient Greek philosophers as Plato’s most insightful and yet enigmatic dialogue, it has continued to defeat well settled interpretations into modern times. The first part of the seminar will primarily focus on the philosophical and historical context of the dialogue. The second part is a detailed consideration of the individual negative and positive hypotheses in the second section of the Parmenides.  The primary teaching approach for this course is lecture based. Students will be expected to do class presentations and submit a final paper at the end of the semester. At the end of the course, students should be able to identify a cluster of problems with respect to the status of the one and the many, vis-à-vis positive and negative outcomes and the implications of these outcomes for Plato’s theory of forms. Students are expected to demonstrate their ability to engage with Plato’s philosophy by means of seminar presentations, dialogue, and the submission of written work.

Plato’s Parmenides

Plato’s Parmenides

 

This seminar is a close examination of the dialectical exercises contained in Plato’s Parmenides that could emanate from a one-sided treatment of either the one or the many. Generally considered by the ancient Greek philosophers as Plato’s most insightful and yet enigmatic dialogue, it has continued to defeat well settled interpretations into modern times. The first part of the seminar will primarily focus on the philosophical and historical context of the dialogue. The second part is a detailed consideration of the individual negative and positive hypotheses in the second section of the Parmenides.  The primary teaching approach for this course is lecture based. Students will be expected to do class presentations and submit a final paper at the end of the semester. At the end of the course, students should be able to identify a cluster of problems with respect to the status of the one and the many, vis-à-vis positive and negative outcomes and the implications of these outcomes for Plato’s theory of forms. Students are expected to demonstrate their ability to engage with Plato’s philosophy by means of seminar presentations, dialogue, and the submission of written work.

Plato’s Parmenides

Plato’s Parmenides

 

This seminar is a close examination of the dialectical exercises contained in Plato’s Parmenides that could emanate from a one-sided treatment of either the one or the many. Generally considered by the ancient Greek philosophers as Plato’s most insightful and yet enigmatic dialogue, it has continued to defeat well settled interpretations into modern times. The first part of the seminar will primarily focus on the philosophical and historical context of the dialogue. The second part is a detailed consideration of the individual negative and positive hypotheses in the second section of the Parmenides.  The primary teaching approach for this course is lecture based. Students will be expected to do class presentations and submit a final paper at the end of the semester. At the end of the course, students should be able to identify a cluster of problems with respect to the status of the one and the many, vis-à-vis positive and negative outcomes and the implications of these outcomes for Plato’s theory of forms. Students are expected to demonstrate their ability to engage with Plato’s philosophy by means of seminar presentations, dialogue, and the submission of written work.

Plato’s Theory of Forms

This seminar examines the development of Plato’s theory of forms from the earlier dialogues through to his more mature treatment of the subject in later works. The principal themes to be investigated are participation, dialectics, the great kinds, and different aspects of mediation between the forms and the phenomenal world. The forms will be examined from metaphysical, ontological, and epistemological perspectives. The seminar focuses on the specific treatment of the forms in Phaedo, Republic, Parmenides, Sophist, and Philebus. Students are expected to acquire a thorough understanding of the nuances and complexities of Plato’s various approaches to the problems engendered by the theory and whether his views on the forms change radically in the different dialogues under consideration. Evaluations of student engagement in the seminar will be on the basis of several short oral presentations and a final written paper of no more than thirty (30) pages.

Plato’s Theory of Forms

This seminar examines the development of Plato’s theory of forms from the earlier dialogues through to his more mature treatment of the subject in later works. The principal themes to be investigated are participation, dialectics, the great kinds, and different aspects of mediation between the forms and the phenomenal world. The forms will be examined from metaphysical, ontological, and epistemological perspectives. The seminar focuses on the specific treatment of the forms in Phaedo, Republic, Parmenides, Sophist, and Philebus. Students are expected to acquire a thorough understanding of the nuances and complexities of Plato’s various approaches to the problems engendered by the theory and whether his views on the forms change radically in the different dialogues under consideration. Evaluations of student engagement in the seminar will be on the basis of several short oral presentations and a final written paper of no more than thirty (30) pages.

Plato’s Theory of Forms

This seminar examines the development of Plato’s theory of forms from the earlier dialogues through to his more mature treatment of the subject in later works. The principal themes to be investigated are participation, dialectics, the great kinds, and different aspects of mediation between the forms and the phenomenal world. The forms will be examined from metaphysical, ontological, and epistemological perspectives. The seminar focuses on the specific treatment of the forms in Phaedo, Republic, Parmenides, Sophist, and Philebus. Students are expected to acquire a thorough understanding of the nuances and complexities of Plato’s various approaches to the problems engendered by the theory and whether his views on the forms change radically in the different dialogues under consideration. Evaluations of student engagement in the seminar will be on the basis of several short oral presentations and a final written paper of no more than thirty (30) pages.

Plato’s Theory of Forms

This seminar examines the development of Plato’s theory of forms from the earlier dialogues through to his more mature treatment of the subject in later works. The principal themes to be investigated are participation, dialectics, the great kinds, and different aspects of mediation between the forms and the phenomenal world. The forms will be examined from metaphysical, ontological, and epistemological perspectives. The seminar focuses on the specific treatment of the forms in Phaedo, Republic, Parmenides, Sophist, and Philebus. Students are expected to acquire a thorough understanding of the nuances and complexities of Plato’s various approaches to the problems engendered by the theory and whether his views on the forms change radically in the different dialogues under consideration. Evaluations of student engagement in the seminar will be on the basis of several short oral presentations and a final written paper of no more than thirty (30) pages.

Plotinus and the Neo-Aristotelian Tradition

This course will primarily focus on Plotinus’ explanation and justification for the affirmation of the One over above the Many, or, more specifically, over the Intellect.  The speculative lead-up to this conclusion, however, draws on a very rich and often ignored Aristotelian tradition.  “His writings … are full of concealed Stoic and Peripatetic doctrines.  Aristotle’s Metaphysics, in particular, is concentrated in them.”  (Porphyry, On the Life of Plotinus and the Order of his Books, 14.6-8)  We will focus on the Platonic esoteric teachings, as it is understood by Aristotle and several other Platonic witnesses.  We will spend time studying the Middle Platonists, notably, Alcinous, and then progress our study into Alexander of Aphrodisias’ Commentary on the De Anima, whose interpretation of Aristotle via the Middle Platonists significantly influenced Plotinus’ reading of Aristotle.  All this will help us understand the philosophical presuppositions influencing Plotinus’ doctrine of the One and his Neo-aristotelian accent.

Plotinus and the Neo-Aristotelian Tradition

This course will primarily focus on Plotinus’ explanation and justification for the affirmation of the One over above the Many, or, more specifically, over the Intellect.  The speculative lead-up to this conclusion, however, draws on a very rich and often ignored Aristotelian tradition.  “His writings … are full of concealed Stoic and Peripatetic doctrines.  Aristotle’s Metaphysics, in particular, is concentrated in them.”  (Porphyry, On the Life of Plotinus and the Order of his Books, 14.6-8)  We will focus on the Platonic esoteric teachings, as it is understood by Aristotle and several other Platonic witnesses.  We will spend time studying the Middle Platonists, notably, Alcinous, and then progress our study into Alexander of Aphrodisias’ Commentary on the De Anima, whose interpretation of Aristotle via the Middle Platonists significantly influenced Plotinus’ reading of Aristotle.  All this will help us understand the philosophical presuppositions influencing Plotinus’ doctrine of the One and his Neo-aristotelian accent.

Plotinus and the Neo-Aristotelian Tradition

This course will primarily focus on Plotinus’ explanation and justification for the affirmation of the One over above the Many, or, more specifically, over the Intellect.  The speculative lead-up to this conclusion, however, draws on a very rich and often ignored Aristotelian tradition.  “His writings … are full of concealed Stoic and Peripatetic doctrines.  Aristotle’s Metaphysics, in particular, is concentrated in them.”  (Porphyry, On the Life of Plotinus and the Order of his Books, 14.6-8)  We will focus on the Platonic esoteric teachings, as it is understood by Aristotle and several other Platonic witnesses.  We will spend time studying the Middle Platonists, notably, Alcinous, and then progress our study into Alexander of Aphrodisias’ Commentary on the De Anima, whose interpretation of Aristotle via the Middle Platonists significantly influenced Plotinus’ reading of Aristotle.  All this will help us understand the philosophical presuppositions influencing Plotinus’ doctrine of the One and his Neo-aristotelian accent.

Plotinus and the Neo-Aristotelian Tradition

This course will primarily focus on Plotinus’ explanation and justification for the affirmation of the One over above the Many, or, more specifically, over the Intellect.  The speculative lead-up to this conclusion, however, draws on a very rich and often ignored Aristotelian tradition.  “His writings … are full of concealed Stoic and Peripatetic doctrines.  Aristotle’s Metaphysics, in particular, is concentrated in them.”  (Porphyry, On the Life of Plotinus and the Order of his Books, 14.6-8)  We will focus on the Platonic esoteric teachings, as it is understood by Aristotle and several other Platonic witnesses.  We will spend time studying the Middle Platonists, notably, Alcinous, and then progress our study into Alexander of Aphrodisias’ Commentary on the De Anima, whose interpretation of Aristotle via the Middle Platonists significantly influenced Plotinus’ reading of Aristotle.  All this will help us understand the philosophical presuppositions influencing Plotinus’ doctrine of the One and his Neo-aristotelian accent.

Political Philosophy

Political Philosophy​

Politics is both a complex matter of fact, and a moral issue. This course will address both aspects of this fascinating field of human activity. We are concerned with the following questions: beneath the variety of existing political regimes, are there any constant features? Are political groupings the result of a “social contract” or of sheer human nature? Why do we come together as political communities? Is there an ideal form of political community?

Political Philosophy

Political Philosophy​

Politics is both a complex matter of fact, and a moral issue. This course will address both aspects of this fascinating field of human activity. We are concerned with the following questions: beneath the variety of existing political regimes, are there any constant features? Are political groupings the result of a “social contract” or of sheer human nature? Why do we come together as political communities? Is there an ideal form of political community?

Political Philosophy

Political Philosophy​

Politics is both a complex matter of fact, and a moral issue. This course will address both aspects of this fascinating field of human activity. We are concerned with the following questions: beneath the variety of existing political regimes, are there any constant features? Are political groupings the result of a “social contract” or of sheer human nature? Why do we come together as political communities? Is there an ideal form of political community?

Prostitution and Pedophilia as Challenges to Theological Thought and Ecclesial Action

Prostitution is a very ancient practice; pedophilia is a practice that only recently has come in the limelight. Reactions to these social and ecclesial phenomenon range from open condemnation to hypocritical denial or blindness. Beyond condemnations in the name of human dignity, beyond trials, laws, politics, support groups, what does the Church have to say and do about it? What contributions can the Gospel, the catholic theological and pastoral traditions offer to current discussions and actions? What do these experiences say about human beings, about God, about the Church? Which pastoral approaches are appropriate, opportune, necessary, just and good?

Prostitution and Pedophilia as Challenges to Theological Thought and Ecclesial Action

Prostitution is a very ancient practice; pedophilia is a practice that only recently has come in the limelight. Reactions to these social and ecclesial phenomenon range from open condemnation to hypocritical denial or blindness. Beyond condemnations in the name of human dignity, beyond trials, laws, politics, support groups, what does the Church have to say and do about it? What contributions can the Gospel, the catholic theological and pastoral traditions offer to current discussions and actions? What do these experiences say about human beings, about God, about the Church? Which pastoral approaches are appropriate, opportune, necessary, just and good?

Prostitution and Pedophilia as Challenges to Theological Thought and Ecclesial Action

Prostitution is a very ancient practice; pedophilia is a practice that only recently has come in the limelight. Reactions to these social and ecclesial phenomenon range from open condemnation to hypocritical denial or blindness. Beyond condemnations in the name of human dignity, beyond trials, laws, politics, support groups, what does the Church have to say and do about it? What contributions can the Gospel, the catholic theological and pastoral traditions offer to current discussions and actions? What do these experiences say about human beings, about God, about the Church? Which pastoral approaches are appropriate, opportune, necessary, just and good?

Prostitution and Pedophilia as Challenges to Theological Thought and Ecclesial Action

Prostitution is a very ancient practice; pedophilia is a practice that only recently has come in the limelight. Reactions to these social and ecclesial phenomenon range from open condemnation to hypocritical denial or blindness. Beyond condemnations in the name of human dignity, beyond trials, laws, politics, support groups, what does the Church have to say and do about it? What contributions can the Gospel, the catholic theological and pastoral traditions offer to current discussions and actions? What do these experiences say about human beings, about God, about the Church? Which pastoral approaches are appropriate, opportune, necessary, just and good?

Psalms and their Use in the Liturgy

The Psalms are among the best known and best liked texts of the Old Testament, even the whole Bible. First, this course will present a general introduction to the Psalms (Name, Place in the canon, Content, Division, Order, Poetic techniques, Titles, Literary genres). Then the course will show how the Psalms were used in the Roman Catholic Liturgy along the centuries, both in the Liturgy of the Hours and the Eucharist. The difference between the scientific exegesis of the first part and the liturgical exegesis of the second part will be studied. Indirectly, since Catholic liturgy has been in Latin for centuries, this course will also be a crash course of Latin.

Psalms and their Use in the Liturgy

The Psalms are among the best known and best liked texts of the Old Testament, even the whole Bible. First, this course will present a general introduction to the Psalms (Name, Place in the canon, Content, Division, Order, Poetic techniques, Titles, Literary genres). Then the course will show how the Psalms were used in the Roman Catholic Liturgy along the centuries, both in the Liturgy of the Hours and the Eucharist. The difference between the scientific exegesis of the first part and the liturgical exegesis of the second part will be studied. Indirectly, since Catholic liturgy has been in Latin for centuries, this course will also be a crash course of Latin.

Psalms and their Use in the Liturgy

The Psalms are among the best known and best liked texts of the Old Testament, even the whole Bible. First, this course will present a general introduction to the Psalms (Name, Place in the canon, Content, Division, Order, Poetic techniques, Titles, Literary genres). Then the course will show how the Psalms were used in the Roman Catholic Liturgy along the centuries, both in the Liturgy of the Hours and the Eucharist. The difference between the scientific exegesis of the first part and the liturgical exegesis of the second part will be studied. Indirectly, since Catholic liturgy has been in Latin for centuries, this course will also be a crash course of Latin.

Questions and Answers Concerning Descartes’ Philosophy

The focus of this course will be Descartes’ first philosophical publication, the Discourse on Method, published in 1637. We will spend one week on each of its parts, paying special attention to the questions and difficulties it raises. The following week, in each case, we will look at a selection from one of his earlier or later writings, in which we will seek answers to the questions and difficulties of the week before. The aim is to come away with a better understanding of the roots, trunk and branches of Descartes’ philosophy than is normally reflected in the secondary literature. 

Questions and Answers Concerning Descartes’ Philosophy

The focus of this course will be Descartes’ first philosophical publication, the Discourse on Method, published in 1637. We will spend one week on each of its parts, paying special attention to the questions and difficulties it raises. The following week, in each case, we will look at a selection from one of his earlier or later writings, in which we will seek answers to the questions and difficulties of the week before. The aim is to come away with a better understanding of the roots, trunk and branches of Descartes’ philosophy than is normally reflected in the secondary literature. 

Questions and Answers Concerning Descartes’ Philosophy

The focus of this course will be Descartes’ first philosophical publication, the Discourse on Method, published in 1637. We will spend one week on each of its parts, paying special attention to the questions and difficulties it raises. The following week, in each case, we will look at a selection from one of his earlier or later writings, in which we will seek answers to the questions and difficulties of the week before. The aim is to come away with a better understanding of the roots, trunk and branches of Descartes’ philosophy than is normally reflected in the secondary literature. 

Questions and Answers Concerning Descartes’ Philosophy

The focus of this course will be Descartes’ first philosophical publication, the Discourse on Method, published in 1637. We will spend one week on each of its parts, paying special attention to the questions and difficulties it raises. The following week, in each case, we will look at a selection from one of his earlier or later writings, in which we will seek answers to the questions and difficulties of the week before. The aim is to come away with a better understanding of the roots, trunk and branches of Descartes’ philosophy than is normally reflected in the secondary literature. 

Questions of Biblical Theology I: How to conceive biblical inspiration today?

Some tenets of the biblical world have been seriously challenged recently. This course wants to explore three topics that seemed clearer in the past but that need rethinking or further thinking today because of recent scholarship or new conditions.

 

Inspiration. All believers and most scholars would still admit that they believe in the inspiration of scriptures. But how is it to be conceived in a way that is acceptable for contemporary believers and scholars? All the ancient models fall short and are unsatisfying, so that new ones must emerge.

Questions of Biblical Theology II: Is there a long-term plan of God in the Old Testament?

Some tenets of the biblical world have been seriously challenged recently. This course wants to explore three topics that seemed clearer in the past but that need rethinking or further thinking today because of recent scholarship or new conditions.

 

Long-term plan. Most believers think that God, somehow, has a plan for them personally and for history. If this plan seems clear in the New Testament, it is not so in the Old Testament. In fact, a long-term plan in the Old Testament seems to be an idea that is coming from the New Testament and supposed for or imposed to the Old Testament. This course will study this question.

Questions of Biblical Theology III: Why is Old Testament Theology no longer possible today?

Some tenets of the biblical world have been seriously challenged recently. This course wants to explore three topics that seemed clearer in the past but that need rethinking or further thinking today because of recent scholarship or new conditions.

Old Testament theology. Since the 18th century, it has been usual, mainly in the Protestant world, to write a “Theology of the Old Testament”. But in the last decades, it became increasingly difficult, even impossible. This course will study the traditional theologies of the Old Testament and see why this kind of literature is now almost impossible today.

Rationalism in the 17th Century

The course offers a study of the method, structure and options of Malebranche’s and Spinoza’ philosophical production in their relations to the propositions of Descartes. The core texts for this 12 are Malebranche’s Recherche de la vérité and Spinoza’s Ethica. Some elements of Leibniz’s approach will also be considered to emphasize the originality of Spinoza.

Rationalism in the 17th Century

The course offers a study of the method, structure and options of Malebranche’s and Spinoza’ philosophical production in their relations to the propositions of Descartes. The core texts for this 12 are Malebranche’s Recherche de la vérité and Spinoza’s Ethica. Some elements of Leibniz’s approach will also be considered to emphasize the originality of Spinoza.

Rationalism in the 17th Century

The course offers a study of the method, structure and options of Malebranche’s and Spinoza’ philosophical production in their relations to the propositions of Descartes. The core texts for this 12 are Malebranche’s Recherche de la vérité and Spinoza’s Ethica. Some elements of Leibniz’s approach will also be considered to emphasize the originality of Spinoza.

Rationalism in the 17th Century

The course offers a study of the method, structure and options of Malebranche’s and Spinoza’ philosophical production in their relations to the propositions of Descartes. The core texts for this 12 are Malebranche’s Recherche de la vérité and Spinoza’s Ethica. Some elements of Leibniz’s approach will also be considered to emphasize the originality of Spinoza.

Reading Adorno’s Minima Moralia Today

Over generations, the School of Frankfurt has proposed various critical perspectives on contemporary society and has made several diagnostics on the damage that it inflicts to humans. In Minima Moralia, Adorno put in place a form of criticism that is rooted in a double option. The first: in the present conditions of existence, freedom and happiness, morality and justice, the good for an individual or a society can be determined only negatively, as in reversed forms. The second, more intermittent but no less powerful: dramatically positive experiences exist, developed in the shadow of temporalities explored by Proust and Benjamin. Minima Moralia offers itself as a type of philosophical practice dating back to the origins of philosophy: the teaching of the good life. In the seminar, after presenting the literary, historical and philosophical context of Minima Moralia, we will explore the structure and issues of this fascinating book. Students will be asked to present, analyze and discuss various sections of the book.

Reading Adorno’s Minima Moralia Today

Reading Adorno’s Minima Moralia Today

Over generations, the School of Frankfurt has proposed various critical perspectives on contemporary society and has made several diagnostics on the damage that it inflicts to humans. In Minima Moralia, Adorno put in place a form of criticism that is rooted in a double option. The first: in the present conditions of existence, freedom and happiness, morality and justice, the good for an individual or a society can be determined only negatively, as in reversed forms. The second, more intermittent but no less powerful: dramatically positive experiences exist, developed in the shadow of temporalities explored by Proust and Benjamin. Minima Moralia offers itself as a type of philosophical practice dating back to the origins of philosophy: the teaching of the good life. In the seminar, after presenting the literary, historical and philosophical context of Minima Moralia, we will explore the structure and issues of this fascinating book. Students will be asked to present, analyze and discuss various sections of the book.

Reading Adorno’s Minima Moralia Today

Over generations, the School of Frankfurt has proposed various critical perspectives on contemporary society and has made several diagnostics on the damage that it inflicts to humans. In Minima Moralia, Adorno put in place a form of criticism that is rooted in a double option. The first: in the present conditions of existence, freedom and happiness, morality and justice, the good for an individual or a society can be determined only negatively, as in reversed forms. The second, more intermittent but no less powerful: dramatically positive experiences exist, developed in the shadow of temporalities explored by Proust and Benjamin. Minima Moralia offers itself as a type of philosophical practice dating back to the origins of philosophy: the teaching of the good life. In the seminar, after presenting the literary, historical and philosophical context of Minima Moralia, we will explore the structure and issues of this fascinating book. Students will be asked to present, analyze and discuss various sections of the book.

Reading Adorno’s Minima Moralia Today

Reading Adorno’s Minima Moralia Today

Over generations, the School of Frankfurt has proposed various critical perspectives on contemporary society and has made several diagnostics on the damage that it inflicts to humans. In Minima Moralia, Adorno put in place a form of criticism that is rooted in a double option. The first: in the present conditions of existence, freedom and happiness, morality and justice, the good for an individual or a society can be determined only negatively, as in reversed forms. The second, more intermittent but no less powerful: dramatically positive experiences exist, developed in the shadow of temporalities explored by Proust and Benjamin. Minima Moralia offers itself as a type of philosophical practice dating back to the origins of philosophy: the teaching of the good life. In the seminar, after presenting the literary, historical and philosophical context of Minima Moralia, we will explore the structure and issues of this fascinating book. Students will be asked to present, analyze and discuss various sections of the book.

Reading Adorno’s Minima Moralia Today

Over generations, the School of Frankfurt has proposed various critical perspectives on contemporary society and has made several diagnostics on the damage that it inflicts to humans. In Minima Moralia, Adorno put in place a form of criticism that is rooted in a double option. The first: in the present conditions of existence, freedom and happiness, morality and justice, the good for an individual or a society can be determined only negatively, as in reversed forms. The second, more intermittent but no less powerful: dramatically positive experiences exist, developed in the shadow of temporalities explored by Proust and Benjamin. Minima Moralia offers itself as a type of philosophical practice dating back to the origins of philosophy: the teaching of the good life. In the seminar, after presenting the literary, historical and philosophical context of Minima Moralia, we will explore the structure and issues of this fascinating book. Students will be asked to present, analyze and discuss various sections of the book.

Reading Adorno’s Minima Moralia Today

Reading Adorno’s Minima Moralia Today

Over generations, the School of Frankfurt has proposed various critical perspectives on contemporary society and has made several diagnostics on the damage that it inflicts to humans. In Minima Moralia, Adorno put in place a form of criticism that is rooted in a double option. The first: in the present conditions of existence, freedom and happiness, morality and justice, the good for an individual or a society can be determined only negatively, as in reversed forms. The second, more intermittent but no less powerful: dramatically positive experiences exist, developed in the shadow of temporalities explored by Proust and Benjamin. Minima Moralia offers itself as a type of philosophical practice dating back to the origins of philosophy: the teaching of the good life. In the seminar, after presenting the literary, historical and philosophical context of Minima Moralia, we will explore the structure and issues of this fascinating book. Students will be asked to present, analyze and discuss various sections of the book.

Reading Adorno’s Minima Moralia Today

Over generations, the School of Frankfurt has proposed various critical perspectives on contemporary society and has made several diagnostics on the damage that it inflicts to humans. In Minima Moralia, Adorno put in place a form of criticism that is rooted in a double option. The first: in the present conditions of existence, freedom and happiness, morality and justice, the good for an individual or a society can be determined only negatively, as in reversed forms. The second, more intermittent but no less powerful: dramatically positive experiences exist, developed in the shadow of temporalities explored by Proust and Benjamin. Minima Moralia offers itself as a type of philosophical practice dating back to the origins of philosophy: the teaching of the good life. In the seminar, after presenting the literary, historical and philosophical context of Minima Moralia, we will explore the structure and issues of this fascinating book. Students will be asked to present, analyze and discuss various sections of the book.

Reading Adorno’s Minima Moralia Today

Reading Adorno’s Minima Moralia Today

Over generations, the School of Frankfurt has proposed various critical perspectives on contemporary society and has made several diagnostics on the damage that it inflicts to humans. In Minima Moralia, Adorno put in place a form of criticism that is rooted in a double option. The first: in the present conditions of existence, freedom and happiness, morality and justice, the good for an individual or a society can be determined only negatively, as in reversed forms. The second, more intermittent but no less powerful: dramatically positive experiences exist, developed in the shadow of temporalities explored by Proust and Benjamin. Minima Moralia offers itself as a type of philosophical practice dating back to the origins of philosophy: the teaching of the good life. In the seminar, after presenting the literary, historical and philosophical context of Minima Moralia, we will explore the structure and issues of this fascinating book. Students will be asked to present, analyze and discuss various sections of the book.

Readings in Medieval Philosophy

Readings in Medieval Philosophy

Close textual examination of actual writings (in translation) of the mediaeval philosophers. Selections from: Augustine: Confessions, City of God, De Trinitate; Aquinas: Summa Theologiae, Summa contra Gentiles. The writings of various other authors such as Dyonisius the Areopagite, Boethius, Scotus Eriugena, Anselm, Abelard, Bonaventure, Duns Scotus, Ockham and Nicolaus of Cusa may also be included.

Readings in Medieval Philosophy

Readings in Medieval Philosophy

Close textual examination of actual writings (in translation) of the mediaeval philosophers. Selections from: Augustine: Confessions, City of God, De Trinitate; Aquinas: Summa Theologiae, Summa contra Gentiles. The writings of various other authors such as Dyonisius the Areopagite, Boethius, Scotus Eriugena, Anselm, Abelard, Bonaventure, Duns Scotus, Ockham and Nicolaus of Cusa may also be included.

Readings in Medieval Philosophy

Readings in Medieval Philosophy

Close textual examination of actual writings (in translation) of the mediaeval philosophers. Selections from: Augustine: Confessions, City of God, De Trinitate; Aquinas: Summa Theologiae, Summa contra Gentiles. The writings of various other authors such as Dyonisius the Areopagite, Boethius, Scotus Eriugena, Anselm, Abelard, Bonaventure, Duns Scotus, Ockham and Nicolaus of Cusa may also be included.

Readings in Medieval Philosophy

Readings in Medieval Philosophy

Close textual examination of actual writings (in translation) of the mediaeval philosophers. Selections from: Augustine: Confessions, City of God, De Trinitate; Aquinas: Summa Theologiae, Summa contra Gentiles. The writings of various other authors such as Dyonisius the Areopagite, Boethius, Scotus Eriugena, Anselm, Abelard, Bonaventure, Duns Scotus, Ockham and Nicolaus of Cusa may also be included.

Readings in Modern Philosophy (16th – 19th Centuries)

The objective of this course is to encourage students to learn to read Modern philosophical texts in a systematic way. Such a process is painstaking at first, but it has many advantages. A student who learns to follow closely the thoughts of a great thinker will be less dependent on secondary sources of opinion.

Readings in Modern Philosophy (16th – 19th Centuries)

The objective of this course is to encourage students to learn to read Modern philosophical texts in a systematic way. Such a process is painstaking at first, but it has many advantages. A student who learns to follow closely the thoughts of a great thinker will be less dependent on secondary sources of opinion.

Readings in Modern Philosophy (16th – 19th Centuries)

The objective of this course is to encourage students to learn to read Modern philosophical texts in a systematic way. Such a process is painstaking at first, but it has many advantages. A student who learns to follow closely the thoughts of a great thinker will be less dependent on secondary sources of opinion.

Readings in Modern Philosophy (16th – 19th Centuries)

The objective of this course is to encourage students to learn to read Modern philosophical texts in a systematic way. Such a process is painstaking at first, but it has many advantages. A student who learns to follow closely the thoughts of a great thinker will be less dependent on secondary sources of opinion.

Readings in Modern Philosophy (16th – 19th Centuries)

The objective of this course is to encourage students to learn to read Modern philosophical texts in a systematic way. Such a process is painstaking at first, but it has many advantages. A student who learns to follow closely the thoughts of a great thinker will be less dependent on secondary sources of opinion.

Relativism in history of ideas

Thomas Kuhn, Paul Feyerabend, Bas Van Fraasen, Michel Foucault, and Ian Hacking have proposed bold and innovative approaches in history of ideas and philosophy of the sciences, which earned them criticism and accusations of relativism. Are these criticisms justified in each case? Should we accept their approaches or attempting to justify them despite these criticisms. The seminar therefore wish to evaluate the relativistic approaches consequences, if any, and propose critical strategies to justify them or reject them.

Relativism in history of ideas

Thomas Kuhn, Paul Feyerabend, Bas Van Fraasen, Michel Foucault, and Ian Hacking have proposed bold and innovative approaches in history of ideas and philosophy of the sciences, which earned them criticism and accusations of relativism. Are these criticisms justified in each case? Should we accept their approaches or attempting to justify them despite these criticisms. The seminar therefore wish to evaluate the relativistic approaches consequences, if any, and propose critical strategies to justify them or reject them.

Relativism in history of ideas

Thomas Kuhn, Paul Feyerabend, Bas Van Fraasen, Michel Foucault, and Ian Hacking have proposed bold and innovative approaches in history of ideas and philosophy of the sciences, which earned them criticism and accusations of relativism. Are these criticisms justified in each case? Should we accept their approaches or attempting to justify them despite these criticisms. The seminar therefore wish to evaluate the relativistic approaches consequences, if any, and propose critical strategies to justify them or reject them.

Relativism in history of ideas

Thomas Kuhn, Paul Feyerabend, Bas Van Fraasen, Michel Foucault, and Ian Hacking have proposed bold and innovative approaches in history of ideas and philosophy of the sciences, which earned them criticism and accusations of relativism. Are these criticisms justified in each case? Should we accept their approaches or attempting to justify them despite these criticisms. The seminar therefore wish to evaluate the relativistic approaches consequences, if any, and propose critical strategies to justify them or reject them.

Religious Experience in Theology

~~The goal of this course is to show that a self-knowledge that aims at being cross-cultural can ground a reflection on faith – Christian and non-Christian – that is ecumenical. We shall discuss issues such as the presence of religious experience in the Bible, in the Church Fathers and in the Medieval writers, the accent put on religious experience since Schleiermacher, the viability of religious experience as a theological category according to Lonergan, the relations between the intellectual and the affective approach to God, the integration of faith and reason, personal and collective authenticity, historical mindedness, pluralism and truth, etc.

Religious Experience in Theology

~~The goal of this course is to show that a self-knowledge that aims at being cross-cultural can ground a reflection on faith – Christian and non-Christian – that is ecumenical. We shall discuss issues such as the presence of religious experience in the Bible, in the Church Fathers and in the Medieval writers, the accent put on religious experience since Schleiermacher, the viability of religious experience as a theological category according to Lonergan, the relations between the intellectual and the affective approach to God, the integration of faith and reason, personal and collective authenticity, historical mindedness, pluralism and truth, etc.

Religious Experience in Theology

~~The goal of this course is to show that a self-knowledge that aims at being cross-cultural can ground a reflection on faith – Christian and non-Christian – that is ecumenical. We shall discuss issues such as the presence of religious experience in the Bible, in the Church Fathers and in the Medieval writers, the accent put on religious experience since Schleiermacher, the viability of religious experience as a theological category according to Lonergan, the relations between the intellectual and the affective approach to God, the integration of faith and reason, personal and collective authenticity, historical mindedness, pluralism and truth, etc.

Religious Experience in Theology

~~The goal of this course is to show that a self-knowledge that aims at being cross-cultural can ground a reflection on faith – Christian and non-Christian – that is ecumenical. We shall discuss issues such as the presence of religious experience in the Bible, in the Church Fathers and in the Medieval writers, the accent put on religious experience since Schleiermacher, the viability of religious experience as a theological category according to Lonergan, the relations between the intellectual and the affective approach to God, the integration of faith and reason, personal and collective authenticity, historical mindedness, pluralism and truth, etc.

Sacraments III: The sacrament of Penance, of Marriage and of the Sick

This course will study the Biblical texts from the Old and New Testaments that show the basis, the understanding and the evolution of: the sacrament of Penance, of Marriage and of the Sick.  The major developments of these three sacraments in the history of the Church.  Generally, this course will evaluate the main stages and the trends of theological reflection on these sacraments from their origins until today.

Sacraments III: The sacrament of Penance, of Marriage and of the Sick

This course will study the Biblical texts from the Old and New Testaments that show the basis, the understanding and the evolution of: the sacrament of Penance, of Marriage and of the Sick.  The major developments of these three sacraments in the history of the Church.  Generally, this course will evaluate the main stages and the trends of theological reflection on these sacraments from their origins until today.

Sacraments III: The sacrament of Penance, of Marriage and of the Sick

This course will study the Biblical texts from the Old and New Testaments that show the basis, the understanding and the evolution of: the sacrament of Penance, of Marriage and of the Sick.  The major developments of these three sacraments in the history of the Church.  Generally, this course will evaluate the main stages and the trends of theological reflection on these sacraments from their origins until today.

Sacraments III: The sacrament of Penance, of Marriage and of the Sick

This course will study the Biblical texts from the Old and New Testaments that show the basis, the understanding and the evolution of: the sacrament of Penance, of Marriage and of the Sick.  The major developments of these three sacraments in the history of the Church.  Generally, this course will evaluate the main stages and the trends of theological reflection on these sacraments from their origins until today.

Sacrements et Liturgie/Sacraments and Liturgy (Ph.D.)

Sacrements et Liturgie / Sacraments and Liturgy (Ph. D.) 
(Visio-conférence à partir de l'IPD / Videoconference from the IPD) 

Au courant du XXe siècle, on a redécouvert les liens étroits entre sacrements et liturgie. Sous l’influence du retour aux sources patristiques et scripturaires, on a réouvert le champ de la sacramentalité pour mieux l’inscrire dans la pratique liturgique concrète. La réforme liturgique de Vatican II a voulu réactualiser ces liens qui s’étaient largement affaiblis avec les siècles.

Le séminaire vise à mettre en relief les différentes facettes de la sacramentalité dans la liturgie, entre autres à travers les rituels des sacrements de l’initiation chrétienne, de l’eucharistie et des sacrements pour les malades. Il sera également question d’aspects de la sacramentalité qui demeurent méconnus ou peu mis en œuvre, comme par exemple la sacramentalité inhérente à l’année liturgique.

 

During the 20th century, the close connection between sacraments and liturgy were rediscovered. Under the influence of the return to patristic and scriptural sources, the field of sacramentality has been reopened to better link it to concrete liturgical practice. The liturgical reform of Vatican II sought to rediscover these ties, which had weakened considerably over the centuries.

This seminar aims to highlight the different facets of sacramentality in the liturgy, inter alia through the rituals of the sacraments of Christian initiation, the Eucharist and the sacraments for the sick. It will also explore aspects of sacramentality that remain little known or little implemented, such as for example the sacramentality inherent in the liturgical year.

Sacrements et Liturgie/Sacraments and Liturgy (Ph.D.)

Sacrements et Liturgie / Sacraments and Liturgy (Ph. D.) 
(Visio-conférence à partir de l'IPD / Videoconference from the IPD) 

Au courant du XXe siècle, on a redécouvert les liens étroits entre sacrements et liturgie. Sous l’influence du retour aux sources patristiques et scripturaires, on a réouvert le champ de la sacramentalité pour mieux l’inscrire dans la pratique liturgique concrète. La réforme liturgique de Vatican II a voulu réactualiser ces liens qui s’étaient largement affaiblis avec les siècles.

Le séminaire vise à mettre en relief les différentes facettes de la sacramentalité dans la liturgie, entre autres à travers les rituels des sacrements de l’initiation chrétienne, de l’eucharistie et des sacrements pour les malades. Il sera également question d’aspects de la sacramentalité qui demeurent méconnus ou peu mis en œuvre, comme par exemple la sacramentalité inhérente à l’année liturgique.

 

During the 20th century, the close connection between sacraments and liturgy were rediscovered. Under the influence of the return to patristic and scriptural sources, the field of sacramentality has been reopened to better link it to concrete liturgical practice. The liturgical reform of Vatican II sought to rediscover these ties, which had weakened considerably over the centuries.

This seminar aims to highlight the different facets of sacramentality in the liturgy, inter alia through the rituals of the sacraments of Christian initiation, the Eucharist and the sacraments for the sick. It will also explore aspects of sacramentality that remain little known or little implemented, such as for example the sacramentality inherent in the liturgical year.

Sacrements et Liturgie/Sacraments and Liturgy (Ph.D.)

Sacrements et Liturgie / Sacraments and Liturgy (Ph. D.) 
(Visio-conférence à partir de l'IPD / Videoconference from the IPD) 

Au courant du XXe siècle, on a redécouvert les liens étroits entre sacrements et liturgie. Sous l’influence du retour aux sources patristiques et scripturaires, on a réouvert le champ de la sacramentalité pour mieux l’inscrire dans la pratique liturgique concrète. La réforme liturgique de Vatican II a voulu réactualiser ces liens qui s’étaient largement affaiblis avec les siècles.

Le séminaire vise à mettre en relief les différentes facettes de la sacramentalité dans la liturgie, entre autres à travers les rituels des sacrements de l’initiation chrétienne, de l’eucharistie et des sacrements pour les malades. Il sera également question d’aspects de la sacramentalité qui demeurent méconnus ou peu mis en œuvre, comme par exemple la sacramentalité inhérente à l’année liturgique.

 

During the 20th century, the close connection between sacraments and liturgy were rediscovered. Under the influence of the return to patristic and scriptural sources, the field of sacramentality has been reopened to better link it to concrete liturgical practice. The liturgical reform of Vatican II sought to rediscover these ties, which had weakened considerably over the centuries.

This seminar aims to highlight the different facets of sacramentality in the liturgy, inter alia through the rituals of the sacraments of Christian initiation, the Eucharist and the sacraments for the sick. It will also explore aspects of sacramentality that remain little known or little implemented, such as for example the sacramentality inherent in the liturgical year.

Sacrements et Liturgie/Sacraments and Liturgy (Ph.D.)

Sacrements et Liturgie / Sacraments and Liturgy (Ph. D.) 
(Visio-conférence à partir de l'IPD / Videoconference from the IPD) 

Au courant du XXe siècle, on a redécouvert les liens étroits entre sacrements et liturgie. Sous l’influence du retour aux sources patristiques et scripturaires, on a réouvert le champ de la sacramentalité pour mieux l’inscrire dans la pratique liturgique concrète. La réforme liturgique de Vatican II a voulu réactualiser ces liens qui s’étaient largement affaiblis avec les siècles.

Le séminaire vise à mettre en relief les différentes facettes de la sacramentalité dans la liturgie, entre autres à travers les rituels des sacrements de l’initiation chrétienne, de l’eucharistie et des sacrements pour les malades. Il sera également question d’aspects de la sacramentalité qui demeurent méconnus ou peu mis en œuvre, comme par exemple la sacramentalité inhérente à l’année liturgique.

 

During the 20th century, the close connection between sacraments and liturgy were rediscovered. Under the influence of the return to patristic and scriptural sources, the field of sacramentality has been reopened to better link it to concrete liturgical practice. The liturgical reform of Vatican II sought to rediscover these ties, which had weakened considerably over the centuries.

This seminar aims to highlight the different facets of sacramentality in the liturgy, inter alia through the rituals of the sacraments of Christian initiation, the Eucharist and the sacraments for the sick. It will also explore aspects of sacramentality that remain little known or little implemented, such as for example the sacramentality inherent in the liturgical year.

Science and Ethics

Science and Ethics

The morality of science has been a debated topic at least since the emergence of modern science. This course examines scientific discourse and practice as presented by philosophy of science. After a survey of some of the main approaches to the justification of scientific theories, such as confirmationism and falsificationism, Thomas Kuhn’s model of scientific revolution, and Paul Feyerabend’s anarchistic position, we will look at the history of scientific ideas, notably through the study of Michel Foucault’s, The Order of Things. We will then explore the intersection of values and ethics to consider the old cliché that “science is fundamentally a-moral” through the study of various cases provided by the professor and the students, such as human experimentation, animal experimentation, stem-cell research, pharmaco-centrism, environmental responsibility and many others. Finally, we will explore research ethics and research ethics bodies in Canada.

Science and Ethics

The morality of science has been a debated topic at least since the emergence of modern science. This course examines scientific discourse and practice as presented by philosophy of science. After a survey of some of the main approaches to the justification of scientific theories, such as confirmationism and falsificationism, Thomas Kuhn’s model of scientific revolution, and Paul Feyerabend’s anarchistic position, we will look at the history of scientific ideas, notably through the study of Michel Foucault’s, The Order of Things. We will then explore the intersection of values and ethics to consider the old cliché that “science is fundamentally a-moral” through the study of various cases provided by the professor and the students, such as human experimentation, animal experimentation, stem-cell research, pharmaco-centrism, environmental responsibility and many others. Finally, we will explore research ethics and research ethics bodies in Canada.

Science and Ethics

Science and Ethics

The morality of science has been a debated topic at least since the emergence of modern science. This course examines scientific discourse and practice as presented by philosophy of science. After a survey of some of the main approaches to the justification of scientific theories, such as confirmationism and falsificationism, Thomas Kuhn’s model of scientific revolution, and Paul Feyerabend’s anarchistic position, we will look at the history of scientific ideas, notably through the study of Michel Foucault’s, The Order of Things. We will then explore the intersection of values and ethics to consider the old cliché that “science is fundamentally a-moral” through the study of various cases provided by the professor and the students, such as human experimentation, animal experimentation, stem-cell research, pharmaco-centrism, environmental responsibility and many others. Finally, we will explore research ethics and research ethics bodies in Canada.

Science and Ethics

The morality of science has been a debated topic at least since the emergence of modern science. This course examines scientific discourse and practice as presented by philosophy of science. After a survey of some of the main approaches to the justification of scientific theories, such as confirmationism and falsificationism, Thomas Kuhn’s model of scientific revolution, and Paul Feyerabend’s anarchistic position, we will look at the history of scientific ideas, notably through the study of Michel Foucault’s, The Order of Things. We will then explore the intersection of values and ethics to consider the old cliché that “science is fundamentally a-moral” through the study of various cases provided by the professor and the students, such as human experimentation, animal experimentation, stem-cell research, pharmaco-centrism, environmental responsibility and many others. Finally, we will explore research ethics and research ethics bodies in Canada.

Science and Ethics

Science and Ethics

The morality of science has been a debated topic at least since the emergence of modern science. This course examines scientific discourse and practice as presented by philosophy of science. After a survey of some of the main approaches to the justification of scientific theories, such as confirmationism and falsificationism, Thomas Kuhn’s model of scientific revolution, and Paul Feyerabend’s anarchistic position, we will look at the history of scientific ideas, notably through the study of Michel Foucault’s, The Order of Things. We will then explore the intersection of values and ethics to consider the old cliché that “science is fundamentally a-moral” through the study of various cases provided by the professor and the students, such as human experimentation, animal experimentation, stem-cell research, pharmaco-centrism, environmental responsibility and many others. Finally, we will explore research ethics and research ethics bodies in Canada.

Science and Ethics

The morality of science has been a debated topic at least since the emergence of modern science. This course examines scientific discourse and practice as presented by philosophy of science. After a survey of some of the main approaches to the justification of scientific theories, such as confirmationism and falsificationism, Thomas Kuhn’s model of scientific revolution, and Paul Feyerabend’s anarchistic position, we will look at the history of scientific ideas, notably through the study of Michel Foucault’s, The Order of Things. We will then explore the intersection of values and ethics to consider the old cliché that “science is fundamentally a-moral” through the study of various cases provided by the professor and the students, such as human experimentation, animal experimentation, stem-cell research, pharmaco-centrism, environmental responsibility and many others. Finally, we will explore research ethics and research ethics bodies in Canada.

Science and Ethics

Science and Ethics

The morality of science has been a debated topic at least since the emergence of modern science. This course examines scientific discourse and practice as presented by philosophy of science. After a survey of some of the main approaches to the justification of scientific theories, such as confirmationism and falsificationism, Thomas Kuhn’s model of scientific revolution, and Paul Feyerabend’s anarchistic position, we will look at the history of scientific ideas, notably through the study of Michel Foucault’s, The Order of Things. We will then explore the intersection of values and ethics to consider the old cliché that “science is fundamentally a-moral” through the study of various cases provided by the professor and the students, such as human experimentation, animal experimentation, stem-cell research, pharmaco-centrism, environmental responsibility and many others. Finally, we will explore research ethics and research ethics bodies in Canada.

Science and Ethics

The morality of science has been a debated topic at least since the emergence of modern science. This course examines scientific discourse and practice as presented by philosophy of science. After a survey of some of the main approaches to the justification of scientific theories, such as confirmationism and falsificationism, Thomas Kuhn’s model of scientific revolution, and Paul Feyerabend’s anarchistic position, we will look at the history of scientific ideas, notably through the study of Michel Foucault’s, The Order of Things. We will then explore the intersection of values and ethics to consider the old cliché that “science is fundamentally a-moral” through the study of various cases provided by the professor and the students, such as human experimentation, animal experimentation, stem-cell research, pharmaco-centrism, environmental responsibility and many others. Finally, we will explore research ethics and research ethics bodies in Canada.

Séminaire méthodologique/Methodological Seminar (Ph.D.)

Séminaire méthodologique/Methodological Seminar (Ph.D.)

 

Il s’agit d’un séminaire méthodologique d’élaboration des projets de thèse et de développement des habiletés propres à une recherche scientifique de niveau doctoral : définition, présentation, critique. Ce séminaire est animé par plusieurs professeurs dans les pôles d’excellence de la faculté.

It is a methodological seminar for the elaboration of research projects and the development of skills suitable for a scientific research at the masters’ and doctoral levels: definition, presentation, criticism. This seminar is animated by some professors of the Faculty according to the areas of excellence.

Séminaire méthodologique/Methodological Seminar (Ph.D.)

Séminaire méthodologique/Methodological Seminar (Ph.D.)

 

Il s’agit d’un séminaire méthodologique d’élaboration des projets de thèse et de développement des habiletés propres à une recherche scientifique de niveau doctoral : définition, présentation, critique. Ce séminaire est animé par plusieurs professeurs dans les pôles d’excellence de la faculté.

It is a methodological seminar for the elaboration of research projects and the development of skills suitable for a scientific research at the masters’ and doctoral levels: definition, presentation, criticism. This seminar is animated by some professors of the Faculty according to the areas of excellence.

Séminaire méthodologique/Methodological Seminar (Ph.D.)

Séminaire méthodologique/Methodological Seminar (Ph.D.)

 

Il s’agit d’un séminaire méthodologique d’élaboration des projets de thèse et de développement des habiletés propres à une recherche scientifique de niveau doctoral : définition, présentation, critique. Ce séminaire est animé par plusieurs professeurs dans les pôles d’excellence de la faculté.

It is a methodological seminar for the elaboration of research projects and the development of skills suitable for a scientific research at the masters’ and doctoral levels: definition, presentation, criticism. This seminar is animated by some professors of the Faculty according to the areas of excellence.

Séminaire méthodologique/Methodological Seminar (Ph.D.)

Séminaire méthodologique/Methodological Seminar (Ph.D.)

 

Il s’agit d’un séminaire méthodologique d’élaboration des projets de thèse et de développement des habiletés propres à une recherche scientifique de niveau doctoral : définition, présentation, critique. Ce séminaire est animé par plusieurs professeurs dans les pôles d’excellence de la faculté.

It is a methodological seminar for the elaboration of research projects and the development of skills suitable for a scientific research at the masters’ and doctoral levels: definition, presentation, criticism. This seminar is animated by some professors of the Faculty according to the areas of excellence.

Seminar – Patristic : The Appearance of a Spirituality of the Gift

Christianity is permeated by a focus on the gift that we can trace from its first theological elaboration, that of the Fathers of the Church. The whole story of God's relationship to humans comes down to the fact that he wants to fulfill them by making them partake of his very life. The creation that inaugurates the fulfillment of his project models the human after his own image, constituting it from its inception as a call to return to him. God becomes closer still to his creation by also making himself, in the Son, a being of flesh. By dying on the cross for their salvation, he will be able to integrate humans – in his resurrected flesh – into the life of the Trinity itself. This, from the full experience of their constitutive reality: the experience of time and history would open them to God, and the earth, place of their deification, would be in solidarity with their ascent to Him. “The glory of God is the living man” says Irenaeus of Lyon, showing how the project of God is shared in his own life and defines for humans a story that is moving towards a return to Him.

Video conference with IP

Seminar – Patristic : The Appearance of a Spirituality of the Gift

Christianity is permeated by a focus on the gift that we can trace from its first theological elaboration, that of the Fathers of the Church. The whole story of God's relationship to humans comes down to the fact that he wants to fulfill them by making them partake of his very life. The creation that inaugurates the fulfillment of his project models the human after his own image, constituting it from its inception as a call to return to him. God becomes closer still to his creation by also making himself, in the Son, a being of flesh. By dying on the cross for their salvation, he will be able to integrate humans – in his resurrected flesh – into the life of the Trinity itself. This, from the full experience of their constitutive reality: the experience of time and history would open them to God, and the earth, place of their deification, would be in solidarity with their ascent to Him. “The glory of God is the living man” says Irenaeus of Lyon, showing how the project of God is shared in his own life and defines for humans a story that is moving towards a return to Him.

Video conference with IP

Seminar – Patristic : The Appearance of a Spirituality of the Gift

Christianity is permeated by a focus on the gift that we can trace from its first theological elaboration, that of the Fathers of the Church. The whole story of God's relationship to humans comes down to the fact that he wants to fulfill them by making them partake of his very life. The creation that inaugurates the fulfillment of his project models the human after his own image, constituting it from its inception as a call to return to him. God becomes closer still to his creation by also making himself, in the Son, a being of flesh. By dying on the cross for their salvation, he will be able to integrate humans – in his resurrected flesh – into the life of the Trinity itself. This, from the full experience of their constitutive reality: the experience of time and history would open them to God, and the earth, place of their deification, would be in solidarity with their ascent to Him. “The glory of God is the living man” says Irenaeus of Lyon, showing how the project of God is shared in his own life and defines for humans a story that is moving towards a return to Him.

Video conference with IP

Social and Political Commitment of Christians

This course proposes a reflection on the issues and dimensions of the social and political commitment of Christians: The imperatives of justice today, the contribution of biblical and theological reflection on the issues of living together and practice of justice in everyday life and in the organization of society, the Social teaching of the Catholic Church, the perspective of Liberation theology.

Social and Political Commitment of Christians

This course proposes a reflection on the issues and dimensions of the social and political commitment of Christians: The imperatives of justice today, the contribution of biblical and theological reflection on the issues of living together and practice of justice in everyday life and in the organization of society, the Social teaching of the Catholic Church, the perspective of Liberation theology.

Social and Political Commitment of Christians

This course proposes a reflection on the issues and dimensions of the social and political commitment of Christians: The imperatives of justice today, the contribution of biblical and theological reflection on the issues of living together and practice of justice in everyday life and in the organization of society, the Social teaching of the Catholic Church, the perspective of Liberation theology.

Social and Political Commitment of Christians

This course proposes a reflection on the issues and dimensions of the social and political commitment of Christians: The imperatives of justice today, the contribution of biblical and theological reflection on the issues of living together and practice of justice in everyday life and in the organization of society, the Social teaching of the Catholic Church, the perspective of Liberation theology.

Synoptic Gospels

An introduction to the study of the New Testament; more particularly the Synoptic Gospels (Matthew, Mark and Luke); and especially to the Gospel of Mark. Introducing exegetical Matthew pertaining to the Synoptic, general overview of each of the Synoptic Gospels, and more in-depth historical, critical, doctrinal and spiritual knowledge of certain passages.

Synoptic Gospels

An introduction to the study of the New Testament; more particularly the Synoptic Gospels (Matthew, Mark and Luke); and especially to the Gospel of Mark. Introducing exegetical Matthew pertaining to the Synoptic, general overview of each of the Synoptic Gospels, and more in-depth historical, critical, doctrinal and spiritual knowledge of certain passages.

The Bible: History, Culture and Faith

General introduction to the Bible in its entirety, including both the Old and the New Testaments, in a believer’s as well as in a cultural perspective. Titles, content and order of the books, diversity of the writings and literary genres, major features and themes, aims and historical context, gradual development of major collections of biblical texts, their normative value and their integration as canonical texts.

The Bible: History, Culture and Faith

General introduction to the Bible in its entirety, including both the Old and the New Testaments, in a believer’s as well as in a cultural perspective. Titles, content and order of the books, diversity of the writings and literary genres, major features and themes, aims and historical context, gradual development of major collections of biblical texts, their normative value and their integration as canonical texts.

The Bible: History, Culture and Faith

General introduction to the Bible in its entirety, including both the Old and the New Testaments, in a believer’s as well as in a cultural perspective. Titles, content and order of the books, diversity of the writings and literary genres, major features and themes, aims and historical context, gradual development of major collections of biblical texts, their normative value and their integration as canonical texts.

The Bible: History, Culture and Faith

General introduction to the Bible in its entirety, including both the Old and the New Testaments, in a believer’s as well as in a cultural perspective. Titles, content and order of the books, diversity of the writings and literary genres, major features and themes, aims and historical context, gradual development of major collections of biblical texts, their normative value and their integration as canonical texts.

The Book of Wisdom: a Stranger in the Bible?

The book of Wisdom does not seem to fit well in the biblical canon. It is a recent deuterocanonical book that seems to teach more Greek philosophy than genuine Jewish doctrine. Do we have here the final stage of wisdom movement or a completely different one more or less heretical? This course will offer first a general introduction to the book and then a deeper study of its major themes (the principle of retribution; immortality; wisdom at work in history).

 

The Book of Wisdom: a Stranger in the Bible?

The book of Wisdom does not seem to fit well in the biblical canon. It is a recent deuterocanonical book that seems to teach more Greek philosophy than genuine Jewish doctrine. Do we have here the final stage of wisdom movement or a completely different one more or less heretical? This course will offer first a general introduction to the book and then a deeper study of its major themes (the principle of retribution; immortality; wisdom at work in history).

 

The Book of Wisdom: a Stranger in the Bible?

The book of Wisdom does not seem to fit well in the biblical canon. It is a recent deuterocanonical book that seems to teach more Greek philosophy than genuine Jewish doctrine. Do we have here the final stage of wisdom movement or a completely different one more or less heretical? This course will offer first a general introduction to the book and then a deeper study of its major themes (the principle of retribution; immortality; wisdom at work in history).

 

The Book of Wisdom: a Stranger in the Bible?

The book of Wisdom does not seem to fit well in the biblical canon. It is a recent deuterocanonical book that seems to teach more Greek philosophy than genuine Jewish doctrine. Do we have here the final stage of wisdom movement or a completely different one more or less heretical? This course will offer first a general introduction to the book and then a deeper study of its major themes (the principle of retribution; immortality; wisdom at work in history).

 

The Church and its Institutions

The Church and its Institutions

After a brief overview of the main principles of Canon Law, this course aims primarily to familiarize the student with what the Code of 1983 calls the Particular Churches and heir Groupings (cc. 368-672); mainly, the Bishops, the Diocesan Synod, the Diocesan Curia, the parishes, the parish council and the pastors.

The Church and its Institutions

The Church and its Institutions

After a brief overview of the main principles of Canon Law, this course aims primarily to familiarize the student with what the Code of 1983 calls the Particular Churches and heir Groupings (cc. 368-672); mainly, the Bishops, the Diocesan Synod, the Diocesan Curia, the parishes, the parish council and the pastors.

The Church and its Institutions

The Church and its Institutions

After a brief overview of the main principles of Canon Law, this course aims primarily to familiarize the student with what the Code of 1983 calls the Particular Churches and heir Groupings (cc. 368-672); mainly, the Bishops, the Diocesan Synod, the Diocesan Curia, the parishes, the parish council and the pastors.

The Church and its Institutions

The Church and its Institutions

After a brief overview of the main principles of Canon Law, this course aims primarily to familiarize the student with what the Code of 1983 calls the Particular Churches and heir Groupings (cc. 368-672); mainly, the Bishops, the Diocesan Synod, the Diocesan Curia, the parishes, the parish council and the pastors.

The Church and Its Ministries

After studying the scriptural foundations of the Church, this course will evaluate the historical questions, the nature (Body of Christ, People of God, Communion…), the mission, the characteristics and the ministries of the Church. The following themes will act as backdrop to the course: the divine plan, the Incarnation and the Church, the Trinity and the Church, salvation and the Church, unity and diversity, authority and collegiality, ecumenism and religious pluralism. A critical reading of texts from theologians (Cyprian, Augustine, Thomas Aquinas…), from the magisterium (Lumen gentium, Dominus Jesus…) and from other Christian churches will allow for proper contextualization and focus to better understand contemporary issues in the Church.

The Church and Its Ministries

After studying the scriptural foundations of the Church, this course will evaluate the historical questions, the nature (Body of Christ, People of God, Communion…), the mission, the characteristics and the ministries of the Church. The following themes will act as backdrop to the course: the divine plan, the Incarnation and the Church, the Trinity and the Church, salvation and the Church, unity and diversity, authority and collegiality, ecumenism and religious pluralism. A critical reading of texts from theologians (Cyprian, Augustine, Thomas Aquinas…), from the magisterium (Lumen gentium, Dominus Jesus…) and from other Christian churches will allow for proper contextualization and focus to better understand contemporary issues in the Church.

The Church and Its Ministries

After studying the scriptural foundations of the Church, this course will evaluate the historical questions, the nature (Body of Christ, People of God, Communion…), the mission, the characteristics and the ministries of the Church. The following themes will act as backdrop to the course: the divine plan, the Incarnation and the Church, the Trinity and the Church, salvation and the Church, unity and diversity, authority and collegiality, ecumenism and religious pluralism. A critical reading of texts from theologians (Cyprian, Augustine, Thomas Aquinas…), from the magisterium (Lumen gentium, Dominus Jesus…) and from other Christian churches will allow for proper contextualization and focus to better understand contemporary issues in the Church.

The Church and Its Ministries

After studying the scriptural foundations of the Church, this course will evaluate the historical questions, the nature (Body of Christ, People of God, Communion…), the mission, the characteristics and the ministries of the Church. The following themes will act as backdrop to the course: the divine plan, the Incarnation and the Church, the Trinity and the Church, salvation and the Church, unity and diversity, authority and collegiality, ecumenism and religious pluralism. A critical reading of texts from theologians (Cyprian, Augustine, Thomas Aquinas…), from the magisterium (Lumen gentium, Dominus Jesus…) and from other Christian churches will allow for proper contextualization and focus to better understand contemporary issues in the Church.

The Corpus Hispanorum de Pace

The Corpus Hispanorum de Pace

During most of the 16th Century in Europe, what has been called a theological and philosophical restoration [Maurice de Wulf] took place, principally, at the University of Salamanca. Although the exact influence exerted by the members of the Salamanca School in the development of modern thought is still an open question, it has become increasingly clear that modern thinkers such as Descartes, Leibniz, Locke, Wolff, Pufendorf and Grotius were strongly influenced by theories developed in the School. The members of the University of Salamanca wrote extensively about a large number of theological, philosophical and legal matters, which have been integrated in what is known as the Corpus Hispanorum de Pace. The seminar will explore some of the most significant theories of that Corpus developed by Francisco de Vitoria, Domingo de Soto, Melchor Cano, Bartolomé de las Casas and Francisco Suárez. We will focus, among other relevant points, on ethics and the natural-law theory of the state, the communitas orbis and the law of war, the legitimacy and the limitations of political power, the emergence of the subjective concept of ius, the political community as a moral entity, modern constitutionalism and the contractarian approach to political obligation.

The Corpus Hispanorum de Pace

The Corpus Hispanorum de Pace

During most of the 16th Century in Europe, what has been called a theological and philosophical restoration [Maurice de Wulf] took place, principally, at the University of Salamanca. Although the exact influence exerted by the members of the Salamanca School in the development of modern thought is still an open question, it has become increasingly clear that modern thinkers such as Descartes, Leibniz, Locke, Wolff, Pufendorf and Grotius were strongly influenced by theories developed in the School. The members of the University of Salamanca wrote extensively about a large number of theological, philosophical and legal matters, which have been integrated in what is known as the Corpus Hispanorum de Pace. The seminar will explore some of the most significant theories of that Corpus developed by Francisco de Vitoria, Domingo de Soto, Melchor Cano, Bartolomé de las Casas and Francisco Suárez. We will focus, among other relevant points, on ethics and the natural-law theory of the state, the communitas orbis and the law of war, the legitimacy and the limitations of political power, the emergence of the subjective concept of ius, the political community as a moral entity, modern constitutionalism and the contractarian approach to political obligation.

The Corpus Hispanorum de Pace

The Corpus Hispanorum de Pace

During most of the 16th Century in Europe, what has been called a theological and philosophical restoration [Maurice de Wulf] took place, principally, at the University of Salamanca. Although the exact influence exerted by the members of the Salamanca School in the development of modern thought is still an open question, it has become increasingly clear that modern thinkers such as Descartes, Leibniz, Locke, Wolff, Pufendorf and Grotius were strongly influenced by theories developed in the School. The members of the University of Salamanca wrote extensively about a large number of theological, philosophical and legal matters, which have been integrated in what is known as the Corpus Hispanorum de Pace. The seminar will explore some of the most significant theories of that Corpus developed by Francisco de Vitoria, Domingo de Soto, Melchor Cano, Bartolomé de las Casas and Francisco Suárez. We will focus, among other relevant points, on ethics and the natural-law theory of the state, the communitas orbis and the law of war, the legitimacy and the limitations of political power, the emergence of the subjective concept of ius, the political community as a moral entity, modern constitutionalism and the contractarian approach to political obligation.

The Corpus Hispanorum de Pace

The Corpus Hispanorum de Pace

During most of the 16th Century in Europe, what has been called a theological and philosophical restoration [Maurice de Wulf] took place, principally, at the University of Salamanca. Although the exact influence exerted by the members of the Salamanca School in the development of modern thought is still an open question, it has become increasingly clear that modern thinkers such as Descartes, Leibniz, Locke, Wolff, Pufendorf and Grotius were strongly influenced by theories developed in the School. The members of the University of Salamanca wrote extensively about a large number of theological, philosophical and legal matters, which have been integrated in what is known as the Corpus Hispanorum de Pace. The seminar will explore some of the most significant theories of that Corpus developed by Francisco de Vitoria, Domingo de Soto, Melchor Cano, Bartolomé de las Casas and Francisco Suárez. We will focus, among other relevant points, on ethics and the natural-law theory of the state, the communitas orbis and the law of war, the legitimacy and the limitations of political power, the emergence of the subjective concept of ius, the political community as a moral entity, modern constitutionalism and the contractarian approach to political obligation.

The Countenance of the Russian God

Throughout its Christian history, the Russian people has fostered a spirituality and a philosophy whose objective is the deification of human being and a cosmic regeneration through the Resurrection of Christ. Visting the key-texts of some XIX-XXth century Russian philosophers and writers ( L. Tolstoy, F. Dostoïevsky, N. Fedorov, V. Solovyov, N. Berdyaev ), the course’s goal is to introduce the participants to the specificity of problems and aspirations that have remained unique to the Russian Christian vision.

The Countenance of the Russian God

Throughout its Christian history, the Russian people has fostered a spirituality and a philosophy whose objective is the deification of human being and a cosmic regeneration through the Resurrection of Christ. Visting the key-texts of some XIX-XXth century Russian philosophers and writers ( L. Tolstoy, F. Dostoïevsky, N. Fedorov, V. Solovyov, N. Berdyaev ), the course’s goal is to introduce the participants to the specificity of problems and aspirations that have remained unique to the Russian Christian vision.

The Countenance of the Russian God

Throughout its Christian history, the Russian people has fostered a spirituality and a philosophy whose objective is the deification of human being and a cosmic regeneration through the Resurrection of Christ. Visting the key-texts of some XIX-XXth century Russian philosophers and writers ( L. Tolstoy, F. Dostoïevsky, N. Fedorov, V. Solovyov, N. Berdyaev ), the course’s goal is to introduce the participants to the specificity of problems and aspirations that have remained unique to the Russian Christian vision.

The Countenance of the Russian God

Throughout its Christian history, the Russian people has fostered a spirituality and a philosophy whose objective is the deification of human being and a cosmic regeneration through the Resurrection of Christ. Visting the key-texts of some XIX-XXth century Russian philosophers and writers ( L. Tolstoy, F. Dostoïevsky, N. Fedorov, V. Solovyov, N. Berdyaev ), the course’s goal is to introduce the participants to the specificity of problems and aspirations that have remained unique to the Russian Christian vision.

The Epistle to the Hebrews

Hebrews is a literary masterpiece with a unique Christology. This epistle is addressed to a community in danger of falling away from its original confession of faith. The author invites these believers to participate in a divine liturgy of enthronement of Jesus Christ as Son of God and as High Priest (Heb 1 – 2) in order to show them that they can share in the power of Christ through faith and to assure them that this high priest now in heaven has offered an eternal and everlasting sacrifice for the remission of their sins. While admitting that Jesus would not be priest if he were still on earth (Heb 7:14; 8:4), the text will build the figure of Christ as high priest by reinterpreting a series of biblical figures: Son, Son of man, Jesus, the One who is sent and Priest, Moses and Aaron, Melchizedek (Heb 3:1 – 7:10).

The Epistle to the Hebrews

Hebrews is a literary masterpiece with a unique Christology. This epistle is addressed to a community in danger of falling away from its original confession of faith. The author invites these believers to participate in a divine liturgy of enthronement of Jesus Christ as Son of God and as High Priest (Heb 1 – 2) in order to show them that they can share in the power of Christ through faith and to assure them that this high priest now in heaven has offered an eternal and everlasting sacrifice for the remission of their sins. While admitting that Jesus would not be priest if he were still on earth (Heb 7:14; 8:4), the text will build the figure of Christ as high priest by reinterpreting a series of biblical figures: Son, Son of man, Jesus, the One who is sent and Priest, Moses and Aaron, Melchizedek (Heb 3:1 – 7:10).

The Epistle to the Hebrews

Hebrews is a literary masterpiece with a unique Christology. This epistle is addressed to a community in danger of falling away from its original confession of faith. The author invites these believers to participate in a divine liturgy of enthronement of Jesus Christ as Son of God and as High Priest (Heb 1 – 2) in order to show them that they can share in the power of Christ through faith and to assure them that this high priest now in heaven has offered an eternal and everlasting sacrifice for the remission of their sins. While admitting that Jesus would not be priest if he were still on earth (Heb 7:14; 8:4), the text will build the figure of Christ as high priest by reinterpreting a series of biblical figures: Son, Son of man, Jesus, the One who is sent and Priest, Moses and Aaron, Melchizedek (Heb 3:1 – 7:10).

The Epistle to the Hebrews

Hebrews is a literary masterpiece with a unique Christology. This epistle is addressed to a community in danger of falling away from its original confession of faith. The author invites these believers to participate in a divine liturgy of enthronement of Jesus Christ as Son of God and as High Priest (Heb 1 – 2) in order to show them that they can share in the power of Christ through faith and to assure them that this high priest now in heaven has offered an eternal and everlasting sacrifice for the remission of their sins. While admitting that Jesus would not be priest if he were still on earth (Heb 7:14; 8:4), the text will build the figure of Christ as high priest by reinterpreting a series of biblical figures: Son, Son of man, Jesus, the One who is sent and Priest, Moses and Aaron, Melchizedek (Heb 3:1 – 7:10).

The Eucharist

First and foremost, the Eucharist will be studied as a memorial of Christ’s death and resurrection, both in its originality and its relation to earlier rituals (Passover, Covenant sealed in blood…). We will then consider why and how the Eucharist can be called thanksgiving, a sacrifice, a meal, and a sacrament, before addressing the multi-faceted dimensions of the Eucharistic presence. The theme of the Eucharist and the Church will be given special emphasis.

The Eucharist

First and foremost, the Eucharist will be studied as a memorial of Christ’s death and resurrection, both in its originality and its relation to earlier rituals (Passover, Covenant sealed in blood…). We will then consider why and how the Eucharist can be called thanksgiving, a sacrifice, a meal, and a sacrament, before addressing the multi-faceted dimensions of the Eucharistic presence. The theme of the Eucharist and the Church will be given special emphasis.

The Eucharist

First and foremost, the Eucharist will be studied as a memorial of Christ’s death and resurrection, both in its originality and its relation to earlier rituals (Passover, Covenant sealed in blood…). We will then consider why and how the Eucharist can be called thanksgiving, a sacrifice, a meal, and a sacrament, before addressing the multi-faceted dimensions of the Eucharistic presence. The theme of the Eucharist and the Church will be given special emphasis.

The Eucharist

First and foremost, the Eucharist will be studied as a memorial of Christ’s death and resurrection, both in its originality and its relation to earlier rituals (Passover, Covenant sealed in blood…). We will then consider why and how the Eucharist can be called thanksgiving, a sacrifice, a meal, and a sacrament, before addressing the multi-faceted dimensions of the Eucharistic presence. The theme of the Eucharist and the Church will be given special emphasis.

The Letters of Saint Paul

This course will study the timeline and main stages of Pauline thought as well as the major characteristics of each letter. It will then review the general presentation of a few basic theological axes including an analysis of texts from each of the different stages of Pauline thought; the traditional letters, the Jewish crisis and the Colossian crisis. It will then study the Pauline Tradition providing a close analysis of the characteristics and themes proper to the Pastoral letters.

September 9th & 23rd, October 7th & 28th, November 11th & 25th, December 9th.

The Letters of Saint Paul

This course will study the timeline and main stages of Pauline thought as well as the major characteristics of each letter. It will then review the general presentation of a few basic theological axes including an analysis of texts from each of the different stages of Pauline thought; the traditional letters, the Jewish crisis and the Colossian crisis. It will then study the Pauline Tradition providing a close analysis of the characteristics and themes proper to the Pastoral letters.

September 9th & 23rd, October 7th & 28th, November 11th & 25th, December 9th.

The Letters of Saint Paul

This course will study the timeline and main stages of Pauline thought as well as the major characteristics of each letter. It will then review the general presentation of a few basic theological axes including an analysis of texts from each of the different stages of Pauline thought; the traditional letters, the Jewish crisis and the Colossian crisis. It will then study the Pauline Tradition providing a close analysis of the characteristics and themes proper to the Pastoral letters.

September 9th & 23rd, October 7th & 28th, November 11th & 25th, December 9th.

The Letters of Saint Paul

This course will study the timeline and main stages of Pauline thought as well as the major characteristics of each letter. It will then review the general presentation of a few basic theological axes including an analysis of texts from each of the different stages of Pauline thought; the traditional letters, the Jewish crisis and the Colossian crisis. It will then study the Pauline Tradition providing a close analysis of the characteristics and themes proper to the Pastoral letters.

September 9th & 23rd, October 7th & 28th, November 11th & 25th, December 9th.

The Main Doctrinal Currents in the Middle Ages

This course will study: the transformations of the ancient heritage (Saint Augustine, the pseudo-Dionysius, Boethius); the leading thinkers and schools of the XIth and XIIth centuries; the translations of Aristotelian, Arab and Jewish works; the high points of Scholasticism in the XIIIth century (Thomas Aquinas, Duns Scotus); and Ockham’s nominalism, in the XIVth century.

The Main Doctrinal Currents in the Middle Ages

The Main Doctrinal Currents in the Middle Ages

This course will study: the transformations of the ancient heritage (Saint Augustine, the pseudo-Dionysius, Boethius); the leading thinkers and schools of the XIth and XIIth centuries; the translations of Aristotelian, Arab and Jewish works; the high points of Scholasticism in the XIIIth century (Thomas Aquinas, Duns Scotus); and Ockham’s nominalism, in the XIVth century.

The Main Doctrinal Currents in the Middle Ages

The Main Doctrinal Currents in the Middle Ages

This course will study: the transformations of the ancient heritage (Saint Augustine, the pseudo-Dionysius, Boethius); the leading thinkers and schools of the XIth and XIIth centuries; the translations of Aristotelian, Arab and Jewish works; the high points of Scholasticism in the XIIIth century (Thomas Aquinas, Duns Scotus); and Ockham’s nominalism, in the XIVth century.

The Main Doctrinal Currents in the Middle Ages

The Main Doctrinal Currents in the Middle Ages

This course will study: the transformations of the ancient heritage (Saint Augustine, the pseudo-Dionysius, Boethius); the leading thinkers and schools of the XIth and XIIth centuries; the translations of Aristotelian, Arab and Jewish works; the high points of Scholasticism in the XIIIth century (Thomas Aquinas, Duns Scotus); and Ockham’s nominalism, in the XIVth century.

The Main Doctrinal Currents in the Middle Ages

The Main Doctrinal Currents in the Middle Ages

This course will study: the transformations of the ancient heritage (Saint Augustine, the pseudo-Dionysius, Boethius); the leading thinkers and schools of the XIth and XIIth centuries; the translations of Aristotelian, Arab and Jewish works; the high points of Scholasticism in the XIIIth century (Thomas Aquinas, Duns Scotus); and Ockham’s nominalism, in the XIVth century.

The Metaphysics of History

In this seminar we will explore the problem of time, the continuity of human identity, the reality (or otherwise) of the entities historians talk about – communities, nations, states – and the associated ideas of causality, providence, and progress.

The Metaphysics of History

In this seminar we will explore the problem of time, the continuity of human identity, the reality (or otherwise) of the entities historians talk about – communities, nations, states – and the associated ideas of causality, providence, and progress.

The Metaphysics of History

In this seminar we will explore the problem of time, the continuity of human identity, the reality (or otherwise) of the entities historians talk about – communities, nations, states – and the associated ideas of causality, providence, and progress.

The Metaphysics of History

In this seminar we will explore the problem of time, the continuity of human identity, the reality (or otherwise) of the entities historians talk about – communities, nations, states – and the associated ideas of causality, providence, and progress.

The Metaphysics of History

In this seminar we will explore the problem of time, the continuity of human identity, the reality (or otherwise) of the entities historians talk about – communities, nations, states – and the associated ideas of causality, providence, and progress.

The Metaphysics of History

In this seminar we will explore the problem of time, the continuity of human identity, the reality (or otherwise) of the entities historians talk about – communities, nations, states – and the associated ideas of causality, providence, and progress.

The Metaphysics of History

In this seminar we will explore the problem of time, the continuity of human identity, the reality (or otherwise) of the entities historians talk about – communities, nations, states – and the associated ideas of causality, providence, and progress.

The Metaphysics of History

In this seminar we will explore the problem of time, the continuity of human identity, the reality (or otherwise) of the entities historians talk about – communities, nations, states – and the associated ideas of causality, providence, and progress.

The Mind of God – Aristotle, Pseudo-Dionysius, Thomas Aquinas

The Mind of God – Aristotle, Pseudo-Dionysius, Thomas Aquinas

Human intellectual history after the High Middle Ages has been a relentless descent from the high ground of Heaven to the rift valley of the underworld – from the Mind of God to the mindlessness of matter – from the light of intelligibility to the murky bleakness of chance. The path to the present has had many high points to many hopes – but the hard won destination unexpectedly leads to a spirit longing for justice, for art free at last, for conclusive evidence – to a spirit imprisoned in an imaginary world, given yet claimed as its very own – a self-imposed world where evidence seeking a conclusion always seems to morph into a conclusion seeking for evidence. Faith exchanged for Evidence – the form of both the same as different in the grip of Imagination – always between intellect and sense, sense and intellect. The human story remains unfulfilled and unfulfillable unless there is a ‘’restoration of all things’’ – a re-acquaintance with the Mind of God – a third path leading out of Tartarus to Olympus making the way stations of justice, art and evidence an experience empowered by excitement and meaning and the promise of achievement gathered not lost. Bonaventure was captivated by the idea of a journey by our soul into the Mind of God. Our three were astonished at God’s completeness – Aristotle at God’s self-relation to all else always existing – Pseudo-Dionysius and Thomas at the teleology of God’s procession and return – at His creative life and pre-existent love – at His timeless enfolding of time. The class will study their astonishment in the hopes of empowering our own.

The Mind of God – Aristotle, Pseudo-Dionysius, Thomas Aquinas

The Mind of God – Aristotle, Pseudo-Dionysius, Thomas Aquinas

Human intellectual history after the High Middle Ages has been a relentless descent from the high ground of Heaven to the rift valley of the underworld – from the Mind of God to the mindlessness of matter – from the light of intelligibility to the murky bleakness of chance. The path to the present has had many high points to many hopes – but the hard won destination unexpectedly leads to a spirit longing for justice, for art free at last, for conclusive evidence – to a spirit imprisoned in an imaginary world, given yet claimed as its very own – a self-imposed world where evidence seeking a conclusion always seems to morph into a conclusion seeking for evidence. Faith exchanged for Evidence – the form of both the same as different in the grip of Imagination – always between intellect and sense, sense and intellect. The human story remains unfulfilled and unfulfillable unless there is a ‘’restoration of all things’’ – a re-acquaintance with the Mind of God – a third path leading out of Tartarus to Olympus making the way stations of justice, art and evidence an experience empowered by excitement and meaning and the promise of achievement gathered not lost. Bonaventure was captivated by the idea of a journey by our soul into the Mind of God. Our three were astonished at God’s completeness – Aristotle at God’s self-relation to all else always existing – Pseudo-Dionysius and Thomas at the teleology of God’s procession and return – at His creative life and pre-existent love – at His timeless enfolding of time. The class will study their astonishment in the hopes of empowering our own.

The Mind of God – Aristotle, Pseudo-Dionysius, Thomas Aquinas

The Mind of God – Aristotle, Pseudo-Dionysius, Thomas Aquinas

Human intellectual history after the High Middle Ages has been a relentless descent from the high ground of Heaven to the rift valley of the underworld – from the Mind of God to the mindlessness of matter – from the light of intelligibility to the murky bleakness of chance. The path to the present has had many high points to many hopes – but the hard won destination unexpectedly leads to a spirit longing for justice, for art free at last, for conclusive evidence – to a spirit imprisoned in an imaginary world, given yet claimed as its very own – a self-imposed world where evidence seeking a conclusion always seems to morph into a conclusion seeking for evidence. Faith exchanged for Evidence – the form of both the same as different in the grip of Imagination – always between intellect and sense, sense and intellect. The human story remains unfulfilled and unfulfillable unless there is a ‘’restoration of all things’’ – a re-acquaintance with the Mind of God – a third path leading out of Tartarus to Olympus making the way stations of justice, art and evidence an experience empowered by excitement and meaning and the promise of achievement gathered not lost. Bonaventure was captivated by the idea of a journey by our soul into the Mind of God. Our three were astonished at God’s completeness – Aristotle at God’s self-relation to all else always existing – Pseudo-Dionysius and Thomas at the teleology of God’s procession and return – at His creative life and pre-existent love – at His timeless enfolding of time. The class will study their astonishment in the hopes of empowering our own.

The Mind of God – Aristotle, Pseudo-Dionysius, Thomas Aquinas

The Mind of God – Aristotle, Pseudo-Dionysius, Thomas Aquinas

Human intellectual history after the High Middle Ages has been a relentless descent from the high ground of Heaven to the rift valley of the underworld – from the Mind of God to the mindlessness of matter – from the light of intelligibility to the murky bleakness of chance. The path to the present has had many high points to many hopes – but the hard won destination unexpectedly leads to a spirit longing for justice, for art free at last, for conclusive evidence – to a spirit imprisoned in an imaginary world, given yet claimed as its very own – a self-imposed world where evidence seeking a conclusion always seems to morph into a conclusion seeking for evidence. Faith exchanged for Evidence – the form of both the same as different in the grip of Imagination – always between intellect and sense, sense and intellect. The human story remains unfulfilled and unfulfillable unless there is a ‘’restoration of all things’’ – a re-acquaintance with the Mind of God – a third path leading out of Tartarus to Olympus making the way stations of justice, art and evidence an experience empowered by excitement and meaning and the promise of achievement gathered not lost. Bonaventure was captivated by the idea of a journey by our soul into the Mind of God. Our three were astonished at God’s completeness – Aristotle at God’s self-relation to all else always existing – Pseudo-Dionysius and Thomas at the teleology of God’s procession and return – at His creative life and pre-existent love – at His timeless enfolding of time. The class will study their astonishment in the hopes of empowering our own.

The Miracles in the Bible

How are we to understand the miracle narratives in the Gospel? How much importance should be placed on miraculous intervention? Why was Christ sometimes portrayed as reluctantly being pulled-in to performing miracles? These questions will form the backdrop for the discussion in this course. Together, we will study the miracle narratives in both the Old and New Testaments, especially in the Gospels, in order to explore how we can better understand the question of the supernatural and its expression in the lives of believers.

The Miracles in the Bible

How are we to understand the miracle narratives in the Gospel? How much importance should be placed on miraculous intervention? Why was Christ sometimes portrayed as reluctantly being pulled-in to performing miracles? These questions will form the backdrop for the discussion in this course. Together, we will study the miracle narratives in both the Old and New Testaments, especially in the Gospels, in order to explore how we can better understand the question of the supernatural and its expression in the lives of believers.

The Miracles in the Bible

How are we to understand the miracle narratives in the Gospel? How much importance should be placed on miraculous intervention? Why was Christ sometimes portrayed as reluctantly being pulled-in to performing miracles? These questions will form the backdrop for the discussion in this course. Together, we will study the miracle narratives in both the Old and New Testaments, especially in the Gospels, in order to explore how we can better understand the question of the supernatural and its expression in the lives of believers.

The Miracles in the Bible

How are we to understand the miracle narratives in the Gospel? How much importance should be placed on miraculous intervention? Why was Christ sometimes portrayed as reluctantly being pulled-in to performing miracles? These questions will form the backdrop for the discussion in this course. Together, we will study the miracle narratives in both the Old and New Testaments, especially in the Gospels, in order to explore how we can better understand the question of the supernatural and its expression in the lives of believers.

The Mystery of God I

Mystery of God I

A pre-requisite and essential discourse is necessary when reflecting on one’s own Christian faith. There are fundamental questions that need to be asked and examined thoroughly. This process is a compulsory passage in the Christian tradition. This course guides students on how to address this question in order to be able to speak in an instructed, coherent and rigorous manner on the characteristics of who we call God. Using a traditional framework, theological arguments and other parameters that define reason will be applied within the context of our contemporary culture to address such fundamental questions such as: does God experience evil and sorrow? Do our prayers incline God’s Providence? Who is God, in a nutshell? At the end of this course, students will demonstrate the ability to express themselves in a knowledgeable manner, coherently and rigorously on the characteristics of who we know as God. Students will acquire abilities to reconstruct their prior knowledge in order to position themselves on these questions while remaining open to peer evaluation. Assessment in this course consists of written assignments and class discussions and a final exam.

The Mystery of God I

Mystery of God I

A pre-requisite and essential discourse is necessary when reflecting on one’s own Christian faith. There are fundamental questions that need to be asked and examined thoroughly. This process is a compulsory passage in the Christian tradition. This course guides students on how to address this question in order to be able to speak in an instructed, coherent and rigorous manner on the characteristics of who we call God. Using a traditional framework, theological arguments and other parameters that define reason will be applied within the context of our contemporary culture to address such fundamental questions such as: does God experience evil and sorrow? Do our prayers incline God’s Providence? Who is God, in a nutshell? At the end of this course, students will demonstrate the ability to express themselves in a knowledgeable manner, coherently and rigorously on the characteristics of who we know as God. Students will acquire abilities to reconstruct their prior knowledge in order to position themselves on these questions while remaining open to peer evaluation. Assessment in this course consists of written assignments and class discussions and a final exam.

The Mystery of God I

Mystery of God I

A pre-requisite and essential discourse is necessary when reflecting on one’s own Christian faith. There are fundamental questions that need to be asked and examined thoroughly. This process is a compulsory passage in the Christian tradition. This course guides students on how to address this question in order to be able to speak in an instructed, coherent and rigorous manner on the characteristics of who we call God. Using a traditional framework, theological arguments and other parameters that define reason will be applied within the context of our contemporary culture to address such fundamental questions such as: does God experience evil and sorrow? Do our prayers incline God’s Providence? Who is God, in a nutshell? At the end of this course, students will demonstrate the ability to express themselves in a knowledgeable manner, coherently and rigorously on the characteristics of who we know as God. Students will acquire abilities to reconstruct their prior knowledge in order to position themselves on these questions while remaining open to peer evaluation. Assessment in this course consists of written assignments and class discussions and a final exam.

The Mystery of God II

Anticipations of the Trinity in the First Testament.
The New Testament, Nicea, Constantinople I.
Richard of St. Victor, Thomas Aquinas, the Eastern Orthodox tradition.
The biblical accounts and Thomas Aquinas’s reflection on creation.
A view of providence taken from Aquinas and Bernard Lonergan.
The possibility of miracles. The problem of evil.

The Mystery of God II

Anticipations of the Trinity in the First Testament.
The New Testament, Nicea, Constantinople I.
Richard of St. Victor, Thomas Aquinas, the Eastern Orthodox tradition.
The biblical accounts and Thomas Aquinas’s reflection on creation.
A view of providence taken from Aquinas and Bernard Lonergan.
The possibility of miracles. The problem of evil.

The Mystery of God II

Anticipations of the Trinity in the First Testament.
The New Testament, Nicea, Constantinople I.
Richard of St. Victor, Thomas Aquinas, the Eastern Orthodox tradition.
The biblical accounts and Thomas Aquinas’s reflection on creation.
A view of providence taken from Aquinas and Bernard Lonergan.
The possibility of miracles. The problem of evil.

The Mystery of God II

Anticipations of the Trinity in the First Testament.
The New Testament, Nicea, Constantinople I.
Richard of St. Victor, Thomas Aquinas, the Eastern Orthodox tradition.
The biblical accounts and Thomas Aquinas’s reflection on creation.
A view of providence taken from Aquinas and Bernard Lonergan.
The possibility of miracles. The problem of evil.

The Mystery of Jesus, Christ and Saviour II

1. Jesus at the origins of Christology. Possible ways of access to the Jesus of history. What is at stake, in the current exegetical research, for faith and theological thinking?

2. The first centuries of Christian reflection. How can we understand the Creed’s “God became flesh”? Emergence and development of Christological dogmas in Church Fathers and in ecumenical councils of the first Christian centuries.

3. Systematic perspectives on Jesus Christ. Thomas Aquinas’s views of Christ in one person and two natures. The human consciousness and knowledge of Jesus. Was he free and/or incapable of sinning?

4. Systematic perspectives on salvation. The Bible’s and Augustine’s understanding salvation. The universal impact of Jesus’ passion and resurrection. To what extent can non-Christian religions offer salvation? Connections between Redemption and secular liberations. Does salvation imply progress in human history?

 

The Mystery of Jesus, Christ and Saviour II

1. Jesus at the origins of Christology. Possible ways of access to the Jesus of history. What is at stake, in the current exegetical research, for faith and theological thinking?

2. The first centuries of Christian reflection. How can we understand the Creed’s “God became flesh”? Emergence and development of Christological dogmas in Church Fathers and in ecumenical councils of the first Christian centuries.

3. Systematic perspectives on Jesus Christ. Thomas Aquinas’s views of Christ in one person and two natures. The human consciousness and knowledge of Jesus. Was he free and/or incapable of sinning?

4. Systematic perspectives on salvation. The Bible’s and Augustine’s understanding salvation. The universal impact of Jesus’ passion and resurrection. To what extent can non-Christian religions offer salvation? Connections between Redemption and secular liberations. Does salvation imply progress in human history?

 

The Mystery of Jesus, Christ and Saviour II

1. Jesus at the origins of Christology. Possible ways of access to the Jesus of history. What is at stake, in the current exegetical research, for faith and theological thinking?

2. The first centuries of Christian reflection. How can we understand the Creed’s “God became flesh”? Emergence and development of Christological dogmas in Church Fathers and in ecumenical councils of the first Christian centuries.

3. Systematic perspectives on Jesus Christ. Thomas Aquinas’s views of Christ in one person and two natures. The human consciousness and knowledge of Jesus. Was he free and/or incapable of sinning?

4. Systematic perspectives on salvation. The Bible’s and Augustine’s understanding salvation. The universal impact of Jesus’ passion and resurrection. To what extent can non-Christian religions offer salvation? Connections between Redemption and secular liberations. Does salvation imply progress in human history?

 

The Mystery of Jesus, Christ and Saviour II

1. Jesus at the origins of Christology. Possible ways of access to the Jesus of history. What is at stake, in the current exegetical research, for faith and theological thinking?

2. The first centuries of Christian reflection. How can we understand the Creed’s “God became flesh”? Emergence and development of Christological dogmas in Church Fathers and in ecumenical councils of the first Christian centuries.

3. Systematic perspectives on Jesus Christ. Thomas Aquinas’s views of Christ in one person and two natures. The human consciousness and knowledge of Jesus. Was he free and/or incapable of sinning?

4. Systematic perspectives on salvation. The Bible’s and Augustine’s understanding salvation. The universal impact of Jesus’ passion and resurrection. To what extent can non-Christian religions offer salvation? Connections between Redemption and secular liberations. Does salvation imply progress in human history?

 

The Origins of Analytic Philosophy

The Origins of Analytic Philosophy

In this course we will look at the very beginnings of Analytic Philosophy. We will start by looking at two of the most influential Oxford Idealists, F. H. Bradley and T.H. Green, and their notions of truth, self-evidence, and being. In the wake of 20th century, Bertrand Russell and G.E. Moore reacted to Bradley’s and Green’s versions of Platonic Idealism. We will focus on Russell’s and Moore’s responses and their subsequent ‘counter-offer’ to Western philosophy which becomes known as the Analytic tradition. We will also look, in passing only, at A. J. Ayer’s of Bradley’s philosophy, as well as Carnap’s refutation of metaphysics. At the end of the course, the professor will provide a quick glimpse at where Analytic philosophy is today, in the wake of the 21st century.

The Origins of Analytic Philosophy

The Origins of Analytic Philosophy

In this course we will look at the very beginnings of Analytic Philosophy. We will start by looking at two of the most influential Oxford Idealists, F. H. Bradley and T.H. Green, and their notions of truth, self-evidence, and being. In the wake of 20th century, Bertrand Russell and G.E. Moore reacted to Bradley’s and Green’s versions of Platonic Idealism. We will focus on Russell’s and Moore’s responses and their subsequent ‘counter-offer’ to Western philosophy which becomes known as the Analytic tradition. We will also look, in passing only, at A. J. Ayer’s of Bradley’s philosophy, as well as Carnap’s refutation of metaphysics. At the end of the course, the professor will provide a quick glimpse at where Analytic philosophy is today, in the wake of the 21st century.

The Origins of Analytic Philosophy

The Origins of Analytic Philosophy

In this course we will look at the very beginnings of Analytic Philosophy. We will start by looking at two of the most influential Oxford Idealists, F. H. Bradley and T.H. Green, and their notions of truth, self-evidence, and being. In the wake of 20th century, Bertrand Russell and G.E. Moore reacted to Bradley’s and Green’s versions of Platonic Idealism. We will focus on Russell’s and Moore’s responses and their subsequent ‘counter-offer’ to Western philosophy which becomes known as the Analytic tradition. We will also look, in passing only, at A. J. Ayer’s of Bradley’s philosophy, as well as Carnap’s refutation of metaphysics. At the end of the course, the professor will provide a quick glimpse at where Analytic philosophy is today, in the wake of the 21st century.

The Origins of Analytic Philosophy

The Origins of Analytic Philosophy

In this course we will look at the very beginnings of Analytic Philosophy. We will start by looking at two of the most influential Oxford Idealists, F. H. Bradley and T.H. Green, and their notions of truth, self-evidence, and being. In the wake of 20th century, Bertrand Russell and G.E. Moore reacted to Bradley’s and Green’s versions of Platonic Idealism. We will focus on Russell’s and Moore’s responses and their subsequent ‘counter-offer’ to Western philosophy which becomes known as the Analytic tradition. We will also look, in passing only, at A. J. Ayer’s of Bradley’s philosophy, as well as Carnap’s refutation of metaphysics. At the end of the course, the professor will provide a quick glimpse at where Analytic philosophy is today, in the wake of the 21st century.

Theological Anthropology

Theological Anthropology

The goal of theological anthropology is to help students question themselves about their identity as human beings. The human being is a very fascinating as well as a very complex subject of study. Because of this complexity, the human being never stops trying to better understand himself and reach the core of his own being. To reach that goal, the lectures will help answer this permanent quest through the help of the Word of God where we can find some important and essential ideas concerning the humanity of God. The lectures will try to bring out some parameters structuring the condition of the Christian believer.

Theological Anthropology

Theological Anthropology

The goal of theological anthropology is to help students question themselves about their identity as human beings. The human being is a very fascinating as well as a very complex subject of study. Because of this complexity, the human being never stops trying to better understand himself and reach the core of his own being. To reach that goal, the lectures will help answer this permanent quest through the help of the Word of God where we can find some important and essential ideas concerning the humanity of God. The lectures will try to bring out some parameters structuring the condition of the Christian believer.

Theological Anthropology

Theological Anthropology

The goal of theological anthropology is to help students question themselves about their identity as human beings. The human being is a very fascinating as well as a very complex subject of study. Because of this complexity, the human being never stops trying to better understand himself and reach the core of his own being. To reach that goal, the lectures will help answer this permanent quest through the help of the Word of God where we can find some important and essential ideas concerning the humanity of God. The lectures will try to bring out some parameters structuring the condition of the Christian believer.

Theological Anthropology

Theological Anthropology

The goal of theological anthropology is to help students question themselves about their identity as human beings. The human being is a very fascinating as well as a very complex subject of study. Because of this complexity, the human being never stops trying to better understand himself and reach the core of his own being. To reach that goal, the lectures will help answer this permanent quest through the help of the Word of God where we can find some important and essential ideas concerning the humanity of God. The lectures will try to bring out some parameters structuring the condition of the Christian believer.

Theology of Environment

Theology of Environment 

Environmental questions and preoccupations occupy an important part, nowadays, of social, political, economic and ethical discussions both at the more theoretical level and in the media. Gestures of diverse types are proposed both at the personal and global levels. Religions have joined the choruses of people requiring action. The Catholic Church with Laudato Si, amongst other documents and instances of action has proposed a vision and a spirituality. This series of lectures want to introduce theologically and critically to these discussions in order to propose an ethical grid to help deliberate appropriate responses to the challenges the environmental situations raises for humanity.

Theology of Environment

Theology of Environment 

Environmental questions and preoccupations occupy an important part, nowadays, of social, political, economic and ethical discussions both at the more theoretical level and in the media. Gestures of diverse types are proposed both at the personal and global levels. Religions have joined the choruses of people requiring action. The Catholic Church with Laudato Si, amongst other documents and instances of action has proposed a vision and a spirituality. This series of lectures want to introduce theologically and critically to these discussions in order to propose an ethical grid to help deliberate appropriate responses to the challenges the environmental situations raises for humanity.

Theology of Environment

Theology of Environment 

Environmental questions and preoccupations occupy an important part, nowadays, of social, political, economic and ethical discussions both at the more theoretical level and in the media. Gestures of diverse types are proposed both at the personal and global levels. Religions have joined the choruses of people requiring action. The Catholic Church with Laudato Si, amongst other documents and instances of action has proposed a vision and a spirituality. This series of lectures want to introduce theologically and critically to these discussions in order to propose an ethical grid to help deliberate appropriate responses to the challenges the environmental situations raises for humanity.

Theology of Environment

Theology of Environment 

Environmental questions and preoccupations occupy an important part, nowadays, of social, political, economic and ethical discussions both at the more theoretical level and in the media. Gestures of diverse types are proposed both at the personal and global levels. Religions have joined the choruses of people requiring action. The Catholic Church with Laudato Si, amongst other documents and instances of action has proposed a vision and a spirituality. This series of lectures want to introduce theologically and critically to these discussions in order to propose an ethical grid to help deliberate appropriate responses to the challenges the environmental situations raises for humanity.

Varieties of Wisdom

"Wisdom is more mobile than any motion," says the author of the The Wisdom of Solomon (7:24), for she shapes and inhabits all sorts of minds (23). We will look at the form in which wisdom expresses herself in a dozen wise minds: in the fragments of Heraclitus, the allegories of Plato, in the reasoning of Cicero, in the dialogical treatment of freedom in Boethius and the answering dialogues he inspired in Lorenzo Valla, and Leibniz, in a magisterial account of perception by St. Thomas, in an essay of Montaigne's concerning inconstancy, in a masterful analysis of the word "the" by Bertrand Russell, in the common sense of G.K. Chesterton, and in a study of ordinary language by Gilbert Ryle. We will close our examination of wisdom with a poem of W.H. Auden's concerning law and love.

Varieties of Wisdom

"Wisdom is more mobile than any motion," says the author of the The Wisdom of Solomon (7:24), for she shapes and inhabits all sorts of minds (23). We will look at the form in which wisdom expresses herself in a dozen wise minds: in the fragments of Heraclitus, the allegories of Plato, in the reasoning of Cicero, in the dialogical treatment of freedom in Boethius and the answering dialogues he inspired in Lorenzo Valla, and Leibniz, in a magisterial account of perception by St. Thomas, in an essay of Montaigne's concerning inconstancy, in a masterful analysis of the word "the" by Bertrand Russell, in the common sense of G.K. Chesterton, and in a study of ordinary language by Gilbert Ryle. We will close our examination of wisdom with a poem of W.H. Auden's concerning law and love.

Varieties of Wisdom

"Wisdom is more mobile than any motion," says the author of the The Wisdom of Solomon (7:24), for she shapes and inhabits all sorts of minds (23). We will look at the form in which wisdom expresses herself in a dozen wise minds: in the fragments of Heraclitus, the allegories of Plato, in the reasoning of Cicero, in the dialogical treatment of freedom in Boethius and the answering dialogues he inspired in Lorenzo Valla, and Leibniz, in a magisterial account of perception by St. Thomas, in an essay of Montaigne's concerning inconstancy, in a masterful analysis of the word "the" by Bertrand Russell, in the common sense of G.K. Chesterton, and in a study of ordinary language by Gilbert Ryle. We will close our examination of wisdom with a poem of W.H. Auden's concerning law and love.

Varieties of Wisdom

"Wisdom is more mobile than any motion," says the author of the The Wisdom of Solomon (7:24), for she shapes and inhabits all sorts of minds (23). We will look at the form in which wisdom expresses herself in a dozen wise minds: in the fragments of Heraclitus, the allegories of Plato, in the reasoning of Cicero, in the dialogical treatment of freedom in Boethius and the answering dialogues he inspired in Lorenzo Valla, and Leibniz, in a magisterial account of perception by St. Thomas, in an essay of Montaigne's concerning inconstancy, in a masterful analysis of the word "the" by Bertrand Russell, in the common sense of G.K. Chesterton, and in a study of ordinary language by Gilbert Ryle. We will close our examination of wisdom with a poem of W.H. Auden's concerning law and love.

Varieties of Wisdom

"Wisdom is more mobile than any motion," says the author of the The Wisdom of Solomon (7:24), for she shapes and inhabits all sorts of minds (23). We will look at the form in which wisdom expresses herself in a dozen wise minds: in the fragments of Heraclitus, the allegories of Plato, in the reasoning of Cicero, in the dialogical treatment of freedom in Boethius and the answering dialogues he inspired in Lorenzo Valla, and Leibniz, in a magisterial account of perception by St. Thomas, in an essay of Montaigne's concerning inconstancy, in a masterful analysis of the word "the" by Bertrand Russell, in the common sense of G.K. Chesterton, and in a study of ordinary language by Gilbert Ryle. We will close our examination of wisdom with a poem of W.H. Auden's concerning law and love.

Varieties of Wisdom

"Wisdom is more mobile than any motion," says the author of the The Wisdom of Solomon (7:24), for she shapes and inhabits all sorts of minds (23). We will look at the form in which wisdom expresses herself in a dozen wise minds: in the fragments of Heraclitus, the allegories of Plato, in the reasoning of Cicero, in the dialogical treatment of freedom in Boethius and the answering dialogues he inspired in Lorenzo Valla, and Leibniz, in a magisterial account of perception by St. Thomas, in an essay of Montaigne's concerning inconstancy, in a masterful analysis of the word "the" by Bertrand Russell, in the common sense of G.K. Chesterton, and in a study of ordinary language by Gilbert Ryle. We will close our examination of wisdom with a poem of W.H. Auden's concerning law and love.

Varieties of Wisdom

"Wisdom is more mobile than any motion," says the author of the The Wisdom of Solomon (7:24), for she shapes and inhabits all sorts of minds (23). We will look at the form in which wisdom expresses herself in a dozen wise minds: in the fragments of Heraclitus, the allegories of Plato, in the reasoning of Cicero, in the dialogical treatment of freedom in Boethius and the answering dialogues he inspired in Lorenzo Valla, and Leibniz, in a magisterial account of perception by St. Thomas, in an essay of Montaigne's concerning inconstancy, in a masterful analysis of the word "the" by Bertrand Russell, in the common sense of G.K. Chesterton, and in a study of ordinary language by Gilbert Ryle. We will close our examination of wisdom with a poem of W.H. Auden's concerning law and love.

Varieties of Wisdom

"Wisdom is more mobile than any motion," says the author of the The Wisdom of Solomon (7:24), for she shapes and inhabits all sorts of minds (23). We will look at the form in which wisdom expresses herself in a dozen wise minds: in the fragments of Heraclitus, the allegories of Plato, in the reasoning of Cicero, in the dialogical treatment of freedom in Boethius and the answering dialogues he inspired in Lorenzo Valla, and Leibniz, in a magisterial account of perception by St. Thomas, in an essay of Montaigne's concerning inconstancy, in a masterful analysis of the word "the" by Bertrand Russell, in the common sense of G.K. Chesterton, and in a study of ordinary language by Gilbert Ryle. We will close our examination of wisdom with a poem of W.H. Auden's concerning law and love.

Ways of Prayer

This course will offer students an opportunity to identify more clearly their own way of praying, to ponder various methods and to sympathetically understand ways practiced by other people.

Various types of prayer will be examined: in the Bible, in St. Thomas Aquinas, among Eastern Orthodox Christians, among modern prayerful people, Catholic and Protestant, Spiritual and psychological aspects of maturing in prayer will also be discussed.

Ways of Prayer

This course will offer students an opportunity to identify more clearly their own way of praying, to ponder various methods and to sympathetically understand ways practiced by other people.

Various types of prayer will be examined: in the Bible, in St. Thomas Aquinas, among Eastern Orthodox Christians, among modern prayerful people, Catholic and Protestant, Spiritual and psychological aspects of maturing in prayer will also be discussed.

Ways of Prayer

This course will offer students an opportunity to identify more clearly their own way of praying, to ponder various methods and to sympathetically understand ways practiced by other people.

Various types of prayer will be examined: in the Bible, in St. Thomas Aquinas, among Eastern Orthodox Christians, among modern prayerful people, Catholic and Protestant, Spiritual and psychological aspects of maturing in prayer will also be discussed.

Ways of Prayer

This course will offer students an opportunity to identify more clearly their own way of praying, to ponder various methods and to sympathetically understand ways practiced by other people.

Various types of prayer will be examined: in the Bible, in St. Thomas Aquinas, among Eastern Orthodox Christians, among modern prayerful people, Catholic and Protestant, Spiritual and psychological aspects of maturing in prayer will also be discussed.

Wisdom Books

This course will present a general introduction to the wisdom movement: its definition, origin, social setting, main features, teaching, etc. Then the wisdom books will be studied in a chronological order: Proverbs, Job, Song of Songs, Qohelet, Sirac and Wisdom of Solomon.

Wisdom Books

This course will present a general introduction to the wisdom movement: its definition, origin, social setting, main features, teaching, etc. Then the wisdom books will be studied in a chronological order: Proverbs, Job, Song of Songs, Qohelet, Sirac and Wisdom of Solomon.

Wisdom Books

This course will present a general introduction to the wisdom movement: its definition, origin, social setting, main features, teaching, etc. Then the wisdom books will be studied in a chronological order: Proverbs, Job, Song of Songs, Qohelet, Sirac and Wisdom of Solomon.

Wisdom Books

This course will present a general introduction to the wisdom movement: its definition, origin, social setting, main features, teaching, etc. Then the wisdom books will be studied in a chronological order: Proverbs, Job, Song of Songs, Qohelet, Sirac and Wisdom of Solomon.

Women of the Old Testament I: The Matriarchs

Women of the Old Testament I: The Matriarchs

Even if the feminist movement is taking now new directions, it is a major movement of the 20th century that deeply changed our societies and our Church. This first part of our study of the women in the Old Testament will look at the famous Matriarchs that is the wives of the Patriarchs, Sarah, Rebekah, Leah and Rachel. We will see that they are much more than their husband’s wives and have each their personality and role in the narrative. 

Women of the Old Testament I: The Matriarchs

Women of the Old Testament I: The Matriarchs

Even if the feminist movement is taking now new directions, it is a major movement of the 20th century that deeply changed our societies and our Church. This first part of our study of the women in the Old Testament will look at the famous Matriarchs that is the wives of the Patriarchs, Sarah, Rebekah, Leah and Rachel. We will see that they are much more than their husband’s wives and have each their personality and role in the narrative. 

Women of the Old Testament I: The Matriarchs

Women of the Old Testament I: The Matriarchs

Even if the feminist movement is taking now new directions, it is a major movement of the 20th century that deeply changed our societies and our Church. This first part of our study of the women in the Old Testament will look at the famous Matriarchs that is the wives of the Patriarchs, Sarah, Rebekah, Leah and Rachel. We will see that they are much more than their husband’s wives and have each their personality and role in the narrative. 

Women of the Old Testament I: The Matriarchs

Women of the Old Testament I: The Matriarchs

Even if the feminist movement is taking now new directions, it is a major movement of the 20th century that deeply changed our societies and our Church. This first part of our study of the women in the Old Testament will look at the famous Matriarchs that is the wives of the Patriarchs, Sarah, Rebekah, Leah and Rachel. We will see that they are much more than their husband’s wives and have each their personality and role in the narrative. 

Women of the Old Testament II: Women in the Historical Books

Women of the Old Testament II: Women in the Historical Books 

In this second part of our study of the women in the Old Testament, we will look at judges and queens who appear here and there in the so-called Historical Books. The narratives about them are shorter, but these women play a major role in the history and traditions of Israel. These are: Rahab (book of Joshua); Deborah and Delilah (book of Judges); Hannah, Michal, Abigail, Tamar (books of Samuel); Bathsheba, Jezebel and Athaliah (books of Kings).

 

 

Women of the Old Testament II: Women in the Historical Books

Women of the Old Testament II: Women in the Historical Books 

In this second part of our study of the women in the Old Testament, we will look at judges and queens who appear here and there in the so-called Historical Books. The narratives about them are shorter, but these women play a major role in the history and traditions of Israel. These are: Rahab (book of Joshua); Deborah and Delilah (book of Judges); Hannah, Michal, Abigail, Tamar (books of Samuel); Bathsheba, Jezebel and Athaliah (books of Kings).

 

 

Women of the Old Testament II: Women in the Historical Books

Women of the Old Testament II: Women in the Historical Books 

In this second part of our study of the women in the Old Testament, we will look at judges and queens who appear here and there in the so-called Historical Books. The narratives about them are shorter, but these women play a major role in the history and traditions of Israel. These are: Rahab (book of Joshua); Deborah and Delilah (book of Judges); Hannah, Michal, Abigail, Tamar (books of Samuel); Bathsheba, Jezebel and Athaliah (books of Kings).

 

 

Women of the Old Testament II: Women in the Historical Books

Women of the Old Testament II: Women in the Historical Books 

In this second part of our study of the women in the Old Testament, we will look at judges and queens who appear here and there in the so-called Historical Books. The narratives about them are shorter, but these women play a major role in the history and traditions of Israel. These are: Rahab (book of Joshua); Deborah and Delilah (book of Judges); Hannah, Michal, Abigail, Tamar (books of Samuel); Bathsheba, Jezebel and Athaliah (books of Kings).

 

 

Women of the Old Testament III: Heroines in the Hellenistic Novels

Women of the Old Testament III: Heroines in the Hellenistic Novels 

In this third part of our study of the women in the Old Testament, we will look at the so-called historical novels of the Hellenistic period. We will study the book of Tobit which develops strong female characters (Sarah, Anna and Edna) and two books whose main character is a woman, Judith and Esther.

Women of the Old Testament III: Heroines in the Hellenistic Novels

Women of the Old Testament III: Heroines in the Hellenistic Novels 

In this third part of our study of the women in the Old Testament, we will look at the so-called historical novels of the Hellenistic period. We will study the book of Tobit which develops strong female characters (Sarah, Anna and Edna) and two books whose main character is a woman, Judith and Esther.

Women of the Old Testament III: Heroines in the Hellenistic Novels

Women of the Old Testament III: Heroines in the Hellenistic Novels 

In this third part of our study of the women in the Old Testament, we will look at the so-called historical novels of the Hellenistic period. We will study the book of Tobit which develops strong female characters (Sarah, Anna and Edna) and two books whose main character is a woman, Judith and Esther.

Women of the Old Testament III: Heroines in the Hellenistic Novels

Women of the Old Testament III: Heroines in the Hellenistic Novels 

In this third part of our study of the women in the Old Testament, we will look at the so-called historical novels of the Hellenistic period. We will study the book of Tobit which develops strong female characters (Sarah, Anna and Edna) and two books whose main character is a woman, Judith and Esther.